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LGIP 3rd Quarter
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LGIP 3rd Quarter

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FY 2011 Q3 Local Government Investment Pool Overview

FY 2011 Q3 Local Government Investment Pool Overview

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  • Welcome to the third Quarter conference call and quarterly meeting
  • Here is today’s agenda we will be going through…
  • Our investment philosophy remains the same: Safety Before Liquidity Before Yield We have formatted today’s presentation to review each pool in this regard.
  • Through the end of March we have distributed $41.6 million to all participants . That breaks down to: $16.6 million for State Agencies $12.9 million for the Endowments $ 7.6 million for LGIP $ 4.3 million for General Fund
  • Now lets start with the LGIP performance
  • Pool 5 is our diversified short term fund similar to a prime money market fund.
  • The Fund continues to maintain the highest rating from S&P: AAAF/S1+ This shows the breakdown of the individual ratings of the securities in the fund. The commercial paper in the fund is rated at the highest levels, A-1 and A-1+
  • Moving to Pool 5 Liquidity. This shows the funds asset mix. You can see that the average weighted maturity is 39 days. We are extending the overall maturities in the fund to pick up some yield, but well within a margin of safety once interest rates increase.
  • Finally, looking at Yield for Pool 5. YTD the fund has yielded 21 basis points and we have beaten the index by 5 basis points. This is net of fees. The Index is against other LGIP funds rated by S&P across the country.
  • Now onto Pool 7 which invests in only products backed by the full faith and credit of the United State Government. At the end of March we were at $1.8 billion with a $1 Net Asset Value.
  • Because Pool 7 invests in products fully backed by the US Government, the securities in the fund are all rated AAA.
  • This is the breakdown of what the fund held. The vast majority in Repurchased Agreements which are primarily overnight cash investment that are collateralized by U.S. Treasuries. The weighted average maturity is 39 days.
  • For Pool 7’s yield we are at 12 basis points YTD - just slightly under the benchmark 90-day T-Bill This is net of fees. Not including fees we would be yielding 18 basis points, compared to the 13 basis points for the 90 day T – Bill which carries no fees.
  • Now moving to our medium term funds. Pool 500 had $208 million in assets and a Floating Net Asset Value of just over $1.02 at the end of March.
  • This shows the breakdown of the individual ratings of the securities in the fund. The weighted average rating of all the securities in Pool 500 is AAA.
  • Pool 500 is a medium term fund with an effective duration of 1.77 years. To mitigate interest rate increases we are keeping Pool 500 shorter with close to half the fund in investments maturing under a year.
  • YTD Pool 500 has yielded 181 basis points and we have beaten the index by 13 basis points. As was said at the last meeting, you might want to think about moving a small portion - say 5 percent - of your Pool 5 funds in to 500 to pick up yield. If this sounds of interest, please contact Dale Stomberg in Investment Accounting.
  • Pool 700 is a full faith and credit medium term fund that had just over $110 million in assets with a Floating Net Asset Value of just over $1 at the end of March. Similar to Pool 500, the State has been investing a small portion of its operating funds in this pool to pick up yield.
  • Pool 700 also has a AAA weighted average rating since all securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.
  • Similar to Pool 500, Pool 700 is a medium term fund with an effective duration of 1.85 years. To mitigate interest rate increases we are keeping Pool 700 shorter with 41% of the fund in investments maturing under a year.
  • YTD Pool 700 has yielded 120 basis points and we have beaten the index by 39 basis points. Again, if you are interested in moving any of your Pool 7 funds into 700 to pick up yield, please contact Dale Stomberg in Investment Accounting.
  • Now, moving on to the Performance for the Endowment for the first 9 months of fiscal year 2011.
  • First, a map of Arizona shows state trust lands, which are in blue, make up 13% of the state The proceeds of state trust land sales come to our office to invest in perpetuity K-12 schools are the prime beneficiary and make up about 87% of state trust land.
  • Total market value of the Endowment is at a record high of $3.2 Our S&P 500 allocation at $1.1 billion Bonds at $1.5 billion Our S&P 400 allocation at $542 million And Our S&P 600 allocation at $55 million
  • This slide shows the growth in the total Market Value of the Endowment since December 2006. Value today of $3.27 billion.
  • Here we show unrealized gains and losses. Gains are also at all-time record at $803 million.
  • This shows the growth in unrealized gains.
  • And the percentage change in the past year of Shares, Book Value, Market Value and Unrealized gains
  • As part of the portfolio review we began in February to make the following changes to its asset allocation.
  • From 1912 to July 1999, the Endowment per the Constitution could only invest in Bonds. Voters in 1998 changed the Constitution to allow up to 60% of the proceeds of land sales to be invested in public equities or stocks. Because the state trust lands were a key feature of the enabling act, anytime there is a change in our Constitution, Congress must also approve it, which they did in July 1999 which at that point the endowment made its first stock purchases.
  • By March 2003, the endowment had reached a 50/50 allocation of stocks and bonds at which point the Board of Investment chose not to continue its phased buy-in approach to reach the 60% threshold. This is where the Endowment was up until the end of February.
  • In February, the Board of Investment approved moving to a 60% allocation to equities; including a 10% allocation to small-cap stocks passively indexed to the S&P 600. This change will occur over a 12 month time frame.
  • Our target is to reach the 60/40 split by next year. The Board also approved a rebalancing trigger that will force sells once the market value increases plus or minus 5% from the target allocation in a month. The goal here is to sell some gains when stocks are high and buy bonds when they are priced lower and vice a versa. Finally, we plan this year to spend some of the earnings from the endowment for its first ever asset allocation study to guide investments over the next 10 years.
  • So now I want to explain to you about how the schools receive funds from the endowment.
  • As part of the 1998 constitutional change, a new distribution formula was put in place that became effective in 2004. In the past, the earnings from the endowment each year were used to off-set state aid to schools. Now, the constitutional formula takes 20% of the returns adjusted for inflation from each of the previous 5 years. Confusing? Yes, so let’s unpack this a bit more.
  • For this current year, the distributions were based on the average total return for the five fiscal years of 2006 through 2010. That was 2.88%
  • From that figure the average inflation for each of those same five years was subtracted, which was 2.13%. That left .75%
  • That .75% is multiplied by the average market value of the endowment for those 60 months which was $2.158 billion to give you a k-12 distribution of $16.2 million for this current year
  • For next year if we assume at 8% return for the current year – which is conservative since we were at 15.42% through March – the five year return would increase to 3.55%
  • From that we estimate inflation at 1.2% for the current year to bring the current five-year average to 1.66%
  • Our estimate for market value would be about $2.4 billion leading to nearly $45 million of distributions for K-12 schools in FY 12. Our first estimate is made in July when we know the total return for the year and a final figure is made in October after the final inflation for the 2 nd quarter is published so we’re hopeful for good news.
  • This is showing Arizona’s operating cash flow. We have been positive for the past 9 months! Today’s balance is:
  • Based on our cash flow models, the state is forecasted to have more cash on hand at the end of the year than at the beginning, a good sign that the worse of our cash flow problems are likely behind us.
  • Looking at total non-farm employment for Arizona. After our last meeting the Bureau of Labor Statistics adjusted the job growth numbers downward for last year, so things are not has bright as we first thought. The trend is at least still positive though.
  • Part of the adjustment, caused our unemployment rate of 9.6% to increase above the national rate of 9.2%. We are doing better than our neighbors in California at 12.3% and Nevada at 13.2%
  • Looking at sales of existing homes, Arizona inched upward in the fourth quarter of last year.
  • This is the average resale price of homes in Arizona as measured by the S&P Case Schiller index. While it has declined recently, it is not the dramatic fall that occurred from the peak in 2006 to the trough in early 2009.
  • I’m now pleased to turn over the presentation now to Richard Stavneak, Staff Director of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee.
  • Thank-you Richard for that insight, We are now ready to take questions. Please remember to identity yourself. You can ask over the phone or use the chat function on your computer screen. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Well thank-you for your attendance today. I appreciate your business. Our next meeting is scheduled for July 28 at 1:30 p.m.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 5.5.2011 LGIP QUARTERLY MEETING & CONFERENCE CALL
    • 2. AGENDA
      • Earnings
      • LGIP Performance
      • Endowment Performance
      • Asset Allocation Changes
      • Endowment Distribution Formula
      • State Cash Flow
      • Arizona Economic Update
      • State Budget Presentation: Richard Stavneak, Director Joint Legislative Budget Committee
      • Q & A
    • 3. INVESTMENT PHILOSOPHY
      • SAFETY
      • before
      • LIQUIDITY
      • before
      • YIELD
    • 4. EARNINGS THRU MARCH 2011
      • $41,626,178
    • 5. LGIP PERFORMANCE 3rd Quarter and FY 2011 YTD
    • 6. Pool 5: Overview
      • $1.4 Billion Assets as of 3/31/2011
      • Net Asset Value - $ .9998 3/31/2011
      • Diversified investments weighted to highly rated Commercial Paper first, Repurchase agreements second, and Agency/Treasuries third
      • Will be extending Weighted Average Maturity slightly but keep under 60 days
      • Keep daily liquidity in the 10-30% range
      • Maintain the highest rating possible from S&P
    • 7. Pool 5: Safety
      • Continues to receive highest rating from Standard & Poor’s: AAAf/S1+
      TSY AAA AA+ A A- A-1 A-1+ 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0 2.9% 35.6% .7% 2.3% 2.3% 52.4% 3.9%
    • 8. Pool 5: Liquidity Weighted Average Maturity: 39 days on 3/31/2011 DURATION: 100% from 0-1 yrs ASSET MIX: 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Corporate Bonds & Bank CD’s Commercial Paper 62% 7% Treasuries & Agencies 31%
    • 9. Pool 5: Yield .21% YTD .16% YTD (S&P LGIP Index)
    • 10. Pool 7: Overview
      • $1.8 Billion Assets as of 3/31/2011
      • Net Asset Value - $ 1.000 3/31/2011
      • Disruptions in the repo market begin April 1, 2011. As a result, yields have declined and we have shifted to holding less overnight repo and laddering out repo purchases along a three to five week time span
      • Will also ladder treasuries and other full faith and credit products up to 13 month horizon
      • WAM will increase but stay under 90 days.
    • 11. Pool 7: Safety
      • AAA Weighted Average Rating
      TSY AAA 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0 24.2% 75.8%
    • 12. Pool 7: Liquidity Weighted Average Maturity: 39 days on 3/31/2011 DURATION: 100% from 0-1 yrs ASSET MIX: 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Treasury Notes & FDIC Bonds Repurchase Agreements 72% 23% 5% Treasury Bills
    • 13. Pool 7: Yield .12% YTD .13% YTD (90 DAY T BILL)
    • 14. Pool 500: Overview
      • $208.6 million in assets as of 3/31/2011
      • Floating Net Asset Value - $1.0286 3/31/2011
      • Will continue to invest in assets that provide a prudent diversification that takes advantage of prevailing market opportunities
      • Keep maximum exposure to any credit at 2.5%
      • Continue to target duration at one year less than the benchmark with 10% to 30% of the fund in liquid short term securities
    • 15. Pool 500: Safety
      • AAA Weighted Average Rating
      70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0 3.2% 16.5% 4.0% 3.2% 0.3% 11.9% 0.5% TSY AGY AAA AA+ AA AA- A+ A A- BBB+ A-1 A-1+ 46.0% 2.7% 2.1% 2.6% 7.0%
    • 16. Pool 500: Liquidity DURATION: ASSET MIX: Corporate Bonds Money Market Securities 85.1% 30% Effective Duration: 1.77 years on 3/31/2011 Mortgage Backed Bonds Treasuries & Agencies 60% 40% 20% 0 23% 33.0% 14%
    • 17. Pool 500: Yield 1.81% YTD 1.68% YTD (Index)
    • 18. Pool 700: Overview
      • $110.5 million in assets as of 3/31/2011
      • Floating Net Asset Value - $ 1.0026 3/31/2011
      • Strategy is to invest in a mix of 1-5 year US Treasuries, GNMA Mortgages and FDIC Paper
      • All securities backed by US Government
      • Continue to target duration at one year less than the benchmark with liquidity managed to meet withdrawal requests
    • 19. Pool 700: Safety
      • AAA Weighted Average Rating
      TSY AGY AAA 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0 48.2% 8.4% 43.4%
    • 20. Pool 700: Liquidity DURATION: ASSET MIX: Treasuries and FDIC paper Repurchase Agreements 85.1% Effective Duration: 1.85 years on 3/31/2011 GNMA Mortgaged Backed Bonds 60% 40% 20% 0 52.2% 27% 16.2% 4.5% ETF’s
    • 21. Pool 700: Yield 1.20% YTD 0.81% YTD (Index)
    • 22. Endowment Performance Through March 2011
    • 23. ENDOWMENT TRUST LANDS
      • 17 % Privately-owned land
      13% State trust land 28% Tribal Reservations 15% US Forest Service 17% Bureau of Land Management
    • 24. ENDOWMENT ASSET ALLOCATION $1,600.04M $1,052.42M $502.79M $1,549.4 million $1,122.1 million $542.2 million $55.4 million S & P 500 Bonds S & P 400 S & P 600
    • 25. ENDOWMENT MARKET VALUE UPWARD TREND $3.27 Billion!
    • 26. ENDOWMENT UNREALIZED GAINS GAINS AT RECORD HIGH $803 million!
    • 27. UNREALIZED GAINS $494,186,000 $800,000 $700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 0 $803,958,581 CHANGE SINCE 2010 MAR 10 MAR 11 ENDOWMENT Q3 FY 11
    • 28. UNREALIZED GAINS SHARES MARKET VALUE BOOK VALUE ENDOWMENT FY 11 3rd QUARTER
    • 29. Endowment Asset Allocation Changes
    • 30. ASSET ALLOCATION: 1999 100% BONDS
    • 31. ASSET ALLOCATION: MARCH 2003 50% BONDS 50% STOCKS
    • 32. ASSET ALLOCATION: MARCH 2011 47.4% BONDS 52.6% STOCKS
    • 33. TARGET ASSET ALLOCATION: FEB 2012 With +/- 5% market value rebalance triggers. Sell high, buy low. 40% BONDS 60% STOCKS
    • 34. Endowment Distribution Formula
    • 35. ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION Formula takes 20% of the returns adjusted for inflation from each of the previous five years. 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    • 36. HOW THE FORMULA WORKS
    • 37. HOW THE FORMULA WORKS SUBTRACT 2.88% - 2.13% = .75%
    • 38. HOW THE FORMULA WORKS (in millions) .75% x $2.158B = $16.2M Equals .75% multiplied by 5-year average market value of $2.158 billion
    • 39. WHAT’S THE FORMULA FORECAST FOR 2012? 2012 PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE
    • 40. WHAT’S THE FORMULA FORECAST FOR 2012? 2012 PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 3.55% - 1.66% = 1.89%
    • 41. WHAT’S THE FORMULA FORECAST FOR 2012? 2012 PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 1.89% x $2.373B = $44.8M
    • 42. State Cash Flow
    • 43. STATE CASH FLOW TOTAL OPERATING ACCOUNT AVERAGE MONTHLY BALANCE BACK IN BLACK $1 Billion in April
    • 44. STATE CASH FLOW Ending balance forecasted to be above beginning balance
    • 45. ARIZONA ECONOMIC UPDATE
    • 46. AZ NON-FARM EMPLOYMENT
    • 47. AZ UNEMPLOYMENT AT 9.6%
    • 48. AZ SALES OF EXISTING HOMES Quarterly Data Jan. 1990 through December 2010
    • 49. AZ HOUSING PRICES
    • 50. Special Presentation Richard Stavneak, Staff Director of the Arizona Joint Legislative Budget Committee
    • 51. State Treasurer’s Quarterly Meeting Revenue and Budget Update May 5, 2011 JLBC
    • 52. Summary of the Current Budget Status Improving, but Long Term Problems Remain
      • Since bottoming out in the winter of 2010, General Fund revenues continue to recover. The end of March marked the 4 th consecutive quarter of growth.
      • Prospects for rapid recovery are mixed:
        • Retail sales increased by 7.3% in the last 3 months and corporate profits have been strong throughout the year.
        • We have reduced foreclosure inventory by one-third – but 35,000 still remain.
        • We are still 319,000 jobs short of the 2007 peak and any construction rebound is more than a year away.
      • New FY ’12 4-sector consensus growth rate of 4.2% is considerably less than budgeted rate of 5.7%.
        • One sector projects a (1.1)% decline in FY ’12. Without that “double dip” recession scenario, forecast would have been 6.0%.
      • In enacted FY ’12 budget, permanent revenues exceed permanent spending – but structural gap reappears once 1 cent sales tax is eliminated in FY 14.
    • 53. Arizona Just Finished 4 th Consecutive Quarter of General Fund Revenue Growth Percent Change From Prior Year
    • 54. Revenue Update - Base Growth of 8.2% Through March - May Not Be Sustainable for Entire Fiscal Year
      • Unusually low ’10 collections and higher business profits boosted corporate %.
      • Individual Income Tax artificially high due to withholding change.
      • After negative summer, sales tax collections have turned positive.
      • Revenues $108 M above January baseline forecast through March 2011.
      YTD ’11 Over ’10 Dec March Sales* -0.6% 1.8% Individual Income 9.7% 13.0% Corporate Income 115.4% 54.8% * Without 1 Cent
    • 55. Recently Enacted Budget Incorporated Some of the Year to Date Revenue Gain
      • Of the $108 M revenue surplus, $72 M due to Individual Income Tax
      • Due to possibility of overwithholding, the approved budget included only $40 M of the $108 M overage
    • 56. Where Are We Headed Over the Next Few Years? - Four-Sector Consensus Forecast Incorporates Different Economics Views, Including the FAC
      • 4-sector forecast equally weights:
      • FAC average
      • UofA model – base
      • UofA model – low
      • JLBC Staff forecast
      • Remaining revenues (10% of total) are staff forecast
      * Includes Big 3 categories of sales tax, individual income and corporate income taxes
    • 57. Forecasting Constraints In the Next 15 Months
      • While revenue recovery has begun, it is difficult to forecast its speed
      • Current forecasts are most useful in determining the direction of the economy, not its precise landing point
      • Certain structural factors limit potential for rapid growth
    • 58. The Road to Recovery Will Still Be Long Highpoint Now Jobs Lost Since December 2007 398,800 (July 2010) 319,000 Pending Foreclosures 51,500 (Dec. 2010) 35,500 Mortgages Underwater 51.3% (Q4, 2009) 50.9%
    • 59. Single Family Permits Suggest Construction Recovery Not Imminent - 40k to 50k Annual Permits Would Reflect Healthy Economy 12-Month Moving Sum 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
    • 60. Sales Tax - The Consensus Forecasts Growth of 1.3% in FY ’11 and 3.2% in FY ’12 ’ 11 YTD = 1.8% ’ 10 Actual = $3.38 Billion Percentage Changes Are Prior To Tax Law Changes. 1¢ Sales Tax Is Not Included.
    • 61. While Sales Tax Collections Are 1.8% Year to Date, Recent Months Have Been Higher % Growth in Sales Tax Compared to Prior Year, Without 1¢ Tax
    • 62. Sales Tax Collections by Category % Growth above prior year
    • 63. Individual Income Tax - The Consensus Forecasts Growth of 9.2% in FY ’11 and 3.6% in FY ’12 ’ 11 YTD = 13.0% ’ 10 Actual = $2.42 Billion Without tax law changes, growth would have been 6.3% in FY ’07 and (4.1)% in FY ‘08 Percentage Changes Are Prior To Tax Law Changes
    • 64. Individual Income Tax Issues
      • 5.9% year to date withholding growth is stronger than expected
        • Far outpaces nominal job and salary growth
        • Due to July withholding table changes?
        • Or, is job data again lagging reality?
      • At same time, however, refunds have declined to date
        • Processing issue?
        • Improved small business profitability?
        • Refunds usually decline in improving economy – may mask overwithholding
    • 65. Corporate Income Tax - The Consensus Forecasts Growth of 37.8% in FY ’11 and 15.0% in FY ’12 ’ 11 YTD = 54.8% ’ 10 Actual = $413 Million Without tax law changes, decline would have been (17.2)% in FY ’08, (20.7)% in FY ’09, and (18.7)% in FY ’10 Percentage Changes Are Prior To Tax Law Changes
    • 66. Corporate Income Tax - Forecast Remains Substantially Below FY ’07 High Point Includes enacted tax law changes. 4-Sector Forecast
    • 67. Corporate Income Tax Could Experience Large % Gain in FY ’11
      • Net collections were up by 115% through December.
      • FY ’10 corporate refunds were inflated by extraordinarily large returns in November 2009.
      • In FY ’10, collections declined by (63)% in the 1 st half of year compared to an increase of 5% in the 2 nd half – as a result, expect lower % growth for rest of FY ’11.
      • Update: In January through March, corporate collections declined relative to FY ’10. As a result, YTD growth down to 55% through March.
    • 68. Consensus Predicts Growth of 5.6% in FY ’11 and 4.2% in FY ’12* FY ’11 FY ’12 10.1% 3.7% 6.9% 6.4% 5.1% -1.1% 7.8% 5.8% Details in Appendix A * Weighted Big 3 average growth prior to 1 ¢ sales tax is 6.4% in FY ’11 and 4.3% in FY ’12. After adjusting for small tax categories, the base growth rate is 5.6% in FY ’11 and 4.2% in FY ’12.
    • 69. Comparison of Consensus Forecast and March Budget - March Budget Assumed 5.7% Base Growth in Both FY ’11 and ’12
      • The April consensus is 0.1% less than the FY ’11 March budgeted rate
      • At 4.2%, the FY ’12 consensus rate is considerably lower than the FY ’12 budgeted rate
        • Without UA Low forecast of (1.1)% decline, the Consensus rate would have been 6.0%
        • A revenue decline would represent a “double dip” recession
    • 70. - To reflect underlying economic growth, “Base” revenues exclude balance forward, tax law changes, one-time revenues, and urban revenue sharing Consensus Forecasts Higher Base Revenue Growth Rate in Both FY ’13 and FY ’14
    • 71. Consensus Forecasts Still Below FY ’07 Level Excludes balance forward and other one-time revenues. Includes tax law changes and Urban Revenue Sharing. FY 12 represents budgeted revenue level.
    • 72. Summary of Enacted Budget Impacts
    • 73. Impact of Enacted Budget
      • The projected FY ’11 baseline shortfall was $(543) M
        • The budget addressed this issue with $211 M of spending reductions, fund transfers, and base revenue adjustments
        • The remaining $332 M shortfall will be resolved in FY ’12
      • The projected FY ’12 shortfall was $1.48 B, including the $332 M FY ’11 shortfall
        • The budget primarily addressed this shortfall with $1.14 B in net spending reductions
    • 74. The FY ’11 and FY ’12 Budget Solutions $ in Millions FY 11 FY 12
      • Baseline Shortfall
        • Unresolved ’11 Shortfall
        • Total Shortfall
      $(543) -- (543) $(1,152) (332) (1,484)
      • Solutions
        • Spending Reductions
        • Fund Transfers
        • Added Base Revenue
        • Other Revenue
        • New Local MVD/DPS/Cash Payments
        • Total Solutions
      • 121
      • 50
      • 40
      • -
      • --
      • 211
      1,143 167 70 43 66 1,489
      • Revised Surplus/Shortfall
      $(332) $5
    • 75. Despite $1.1 B in Reductions, Overall Spending Levels Remain Near $8.3 B - Backfill of Federal Stimulus Funds Offsets Reductions $ in Millions Backfill/Caseload Net Reductions Net Change Department of Education $143 $(163) $(20) AHCCCS 499 (511) (12) Department of Corrections (7) 10 3 Universities 0 (198) (198) DES 64 (50) 14 DHS 155 (97) 58 SFB 97 0 97 One Extra Payroll 79 0 79 Employee Benefit Savings 0 (62) (62) Total $1,030 $1,071 $(41)
    • 76. In January, the FY 12 Structural Gap was $(1.0) B - Represents On-Going Revenues Versus Ongoing Expenditures Surplus/ Shortfall ($ in Millions) “ The Structural Shortfall” Counts 1 ¢ TPT as on-going in FY ’12 – FY ’14
    • 77. With the Newly Enacted Budget, the Structural Gap Has Been Eliminated Through FY ’13 - Gap Reappears in FY ’14 with Lapse of 1¢ Sales Tax Counts 1 ¢ TPT as on-going in FY ’12 – FY ’14 “ The Structural Shortfall” Surplus/ Shortfall ($ in Millions)
    • 78. Structural Gap Does Not Include Inactive Formulas - Including These Formulas, the “Shadow Shortfall” in FY ’14 is $1.6 B
      • JLBC Baseline estimates assume the continuation of current statutory suspensions
      • In January, inactive formulas were estimated at $1.3 B
      • Current estimate of statutory suspensions is $1.0 B (see Appendix B)
        • Budget reduced this amount by making some past reductions permanent
        • However, some new solutions were formula suspensions
    • 79. Appendix A: March 2011 4-Sector Forecast FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 Sales Tax JLBC Forecast 2.8% 5.5% 6.7% 7.1% UA – Low -1.6% -1.8% 5.1% 7.6% UA – Base 1.5% 3.1% 6.6% 7.7% FAC 2.3% 6.1% 5.6% 5.9% Average: 1.3% 3.2% 6.0% 7.1% Individual Income Tax JLBC Forecast 6.7% 6.4% 6.8% 7.0% UA - Low 6.7% -5.2% 6.1% 8.1% UA – Base 15.7% 6.1% 7.1% 7.4% FAC 7.8% 7.2% 6.4% 6.4% Average: 9.2% 3.6% 6.6% 7.2% Corporate Income Tax JLBC Forecast 34.5% 4.8% 2.9% 7.8% UA – Low 29.3% 22.7% -1.1% 8.6% UA – Base 48.3% 11.6% 2.2% 24.9% FAC 39.2% 20.9% 12.0% 7.7% Average: 37.8% 15.0% 4.0% 12.2% JLBC Weighted Average: 6.4% 5.8% 6.4% 7.1% UA Low Weighted Average 3.7% -1.1% 4.8% 7.9% UA Base Weighted Average 10.1% 5.1% 6.4% 9.1% FAC Weighted Average: 6.9% 7.8% 6.5% 6.3% Consensus Weighted Average: 5.6%* 4.2%* 6.0% 7.6% * Consensus forecast adjusted for small revenue categories
    • 80. Appendix B: Funding Formula Suspensions Statutory Funding Formula Suspensions* Agency Formula FY 2012 Formula Requirement BASELINE FY 2012 Formula Requirement ENACTED Community College Capital State Aid Suspension $22,155,200 $22,155,200 Department of Education Soft-Capital Formula $165,120,700 $188,120,700 New Utilities Formula $100,000,000 $0 Charter School Additional Assistance $10,000,000 $17,656,000 Capital Outlay Revenue Limit (CORL) - $63,684,600 CORL – EduJobs - $35,000,000 Fund JTEDs at 91% $4,849,100 $4,849,100 Department of Emergency & Military Affairs Military Installation Fund Deposit $2,800,000 $0 Governor’s Emergency Fund $1,100,000 $1,100,000 Department of Environmental Quality WQARF $8,000,000 $8,000,000 Department of Health Services Restoration to Competency $1,740,600 $1,740,600 SVP $2,670,300 $2,670,300 Judiciary Probation Revocation Payment $2,410,300 $0 School Facilities Board Building Renewal $241,593,600 $241,593,600 Tourism Tourism Funding Formula $14,350,100 $14,350,100 State Treasurer Justice of the Peace Salaries $1,115,000 $0 Universities Financial Aid Trust $4,089,600 $4,089,600 Department of Water Resources Water Protection Fund Transfer $5,000,000 $0 Subtotal $586,994,500 $605,009,800 Future Year Cost – Department of Education Teacher Performance Pay (by FY 2018) $278,000,000 $0 Future Year Cost – School Facilities Board New School Construction (If enrollment returns to pre-recession level) $386,000,000 $386,000,000 Total $1,250,994,500 $991,009,800 Non-Statutory Formula Suspensions Department of Administration Building Renewal $38,710,500 $27,580,000 Universities General Fund Enrollment $28,432,000 $28,432,000 Building Renewal $90,136,900 $90,136,900 Subtotal $157,279,400 $146,148,900 * Excludes AHCCCS suspensions which are accounted for in the Baseline.
    • 81. QUESTIONS?

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