Pedagogical best practice criteria for sustainable elearning
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Pedagogical best practice criteria for sustainable elearning

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  • Traditional tripod of sustainability: environmental, economic, social Social licence to operate Social sustainability of universities under question as never before Pedgagogy (teaching) as subset of social sustainability
  • First point. Fundamental part of social sustainability is education. What we do is teaching! To claim to be sustainable, we have to teach sustainability. Not just offering courses in sustainability, environmental science, economics, and so on Embedded as an aspect of all subjects – sustainability touches everything.
  • What’s different in pedagogical terms?
  • Strong claim: there is nothing fundamentally different in pedagogical terms about learning online. Different opportunities offered by different tools and techniques, but that’s not new: lectures are different from small-group work Reading text is different from using an online simulation A role-play exercise is different from a teacher’s monologue, whether in a large physical room or a forum vs online video
  • There isn’t a right answer; if only using a limited subset of methods, unlikely to be good. Use different media appropriately and to their strengths No Significant Difference – if teaching same curriculum using different methods and same assessment. But can’t teach some things with some methods, Can teach more sustainably with some for some topics
  • Learning Design – Loads of projects CompendiumLD - http://compendiumld.open.ac.uk/ Phebe http://phoebe-app.conted.ox.ac.uk/ Learning Designer http://www.tel.ac.uk/ldse/ (nee London Pedagogy Planner) Co-genT http://www.pebblepad.co.uk/cogent/ This is how you do the variety sensibly. Plan out what you are going to do, what sort of things you are going to do, how long it will take, what sort of an experience it is, how it will be assessed (come on to) Evidence – including evidence on sustainability of options – environmental, economic. Can be by policy )institutional, faculty, dept) or directly.
  • Nothing (much) - One clear difference with elearning vs trad: data exhaust Traditional feedback from marks, end-of-course surveys (NSS) Faster with elearning. But more than just that Big data! Can model at-risk students, at-risk behaviour – not logged in for 5 weeks, low prev ed quals, low SES – flag for action Social network analysis – spot
  • Staff are our greatest asset Traditional academic apprenticeship model serves us badly here How you were taught is not how you will teach Must have range of experience Not necessarily courses, CPD, but that helps. Space and scope for experimenting, developing. Sustainable development includes people! Education!
  • Stick and carrot Anticipatory duty under Disability Discrimination Act. Reasonable adjustments. Access for all: making it better for people with disabilities makes it more accessible for anyone. Video transcript – useful if hearing impaired, or if studying in a library. Also good proxy test for whether it has been tested at all.
  • They only study what’s on the test Assessment defines the de facto/hidden curriculum. Might have a lovely expansive, creative, conceptual-change focused course. But if assessment is MCQs with single right answers rewarding rote memorisation, they’ll do that.
  • Technology changes fast. Moore’s Law: processor speed doubling 18 months. Innovation spectacular pace. If not doing something different now than did 5 years ago, you’re not using media effectively. Expect the tools to get better. Also, you did do feedback didn’t you?
  • Curriculum: Sustainability is embedded within and across the curriculum (i.e. as a subject, and as an aspect of other subjects). Learning design: The design of elearning activities is underpinned by a rational process of learning design and informed by evidence. Variety of methods: A variety of elearning methods and tools are appropriately employed. Learning analytics: Information about learner activity, progress and outcomes is routinely, rapidly and actionably made available to staff and the individual learners themselves. Staff development: Staff have appropriate and broad experience of a range of elearning methods and tools, and actively update their skills and understanding. Accessibility: Accessibility is explicitly assessed and meets or exceeds international standards and domestic legal requirements. Assessment: Assessment allows learners to demonstrate their learning and provides them with appropriate feedback. Enhancement: Elearning and outcomes are regularly reviewed and provision enhanced in the light of developing tools and research.

Pedagogical best practice criteria for sustainable elearning Pedagogical best practice criteria for sustainable elearning Presentation Transcript

  • Pedagogical best practice criteria Doug Clow JISC Best Practice Criteria for Sustainable E-Learning 1 st November 2011
    • pedagogical sustainability
    Image (cc) Jeremy Levine Design http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremylevinedesign/2903370723/ social sustainability
    • Curriculum
    • Sustainability is embedded within and across the curriculum (i.e. as a subject, and as an aspect of other subjects)
    Image (cc) Liamngls http://www.flickr.com/photos/liamngls/413522957/
    • What’s different about elearning?
    Image (cc) Windel Oskay http://www.flickr.com/photos/oskay/313890922/
    • nothing (much)
    • Variety of methods
    • A variety of elearning methods and tools are appropriately employed.
    Image (cc) Meanest Indian http://www.flickr.com/photos/meanestindian/314721676/
    • Learning design
    • The design of elearning activities is underpinned by a rational process of learning design and informed by evidence.
    Image (cc) Kevin Dooley http://www.flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/4176075327/
    • Learning analytics
    • Information about learner activity, progress and outcomes is routinely, rapidly and actionably made available to staff and the individual learners themselves.
    Image (cc) Doug Clow http://www.flickr.com/photos/dougclow/5484184568/
    • Staff development
    • Staff have appropriate and broad experience of a range of elearning methods and tools, and actively update their skills and understanding.
    Image (cc) Jakob Montrasio http://www.flickr.com/photos/yakobusan/2436481628/
    • Accessibility
    • Accessibility is explicitly assessed and meets or exceeds international standards and domestic legal requirements.
    Image (cc) iamtheo http://www.flickr.com/photos/_theo_/4875031854/
    • Assessment
    • Assessment allows learners to demonstrate their learning and provides them with appropriate feedback.
    Image (cc) Darwin Bell http://www.flickr.com/photos/darwinbell/296553221/
    • Enhancement
    • Elearning and outcomes are regularly reviewed and provision enhanced in the light of developing tools and research.
    Image (cc) David Fulmer http://www.flickr.com/photos/daveynin/5270798581/
  • Pedagogical criteria
    • Curriculum
    • Learning design
    • Variety of methods
    • Learning analytics
    • Staff development
    • Accessibility
    • Assessment
    • Enhancement
  • Doug Clow slideshare.net/dougclow dougclow.wordpress.com @dougclow [email_address]
    • www.open.ac.uk
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.