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F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
F. forum powerpoint presentation
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F. forum powerpoint presentation

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  • 1. “SHIFTING TRENDS IN ART FOUNDATION” FATE Regional Forum Foundations in Art: Theory and Education December 2, 2011 10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Woodbury University Hosted by Woodbury University Design Foundation Program
  • 2. Goals for this Event• Build community• Exchange ideas• Improve our programs
  • 3. Traditionally What Do We Do?• Teach drawing and design (2D and 3D) elements, principles and core skills• Provide a preparation for majors• Provide historical and cultural context
  • 4. Who are we?• Diverse – foundations, core, first year• Collaborative and “interdisciplinary”• Experienced• Important• Underappreciated?• On the front lines• Not alone - organizations
  • 5. FATE: Foundations in Art: Theory and Education• Founded in 1977 • Assignment exchange• Professional affiliation with • Position announcements College Art Association (CAA) • Institutional membership• Mission: Dedicated to the ($50/two years), Institutional promotion of excellence in the membership ($100/year) development and teaching of • Website: Foundations-art.org college-level foundation courses in both studio and art history• FATE Biennial (since 1986) and regional events• Publish Journal (FATE in Review) and Newsletter
  • 6. ITI – Integrative Teaching International • Grew out of FATE • Founded in 2006 • “Integrative Teaching International (ITI) promotes wide sweeping discussion about the state of teaching and learning in the 21st century. Through our annual ThinkTank event, our journal “Future Forward,” and other sponsored programs, ITI seeks to foster intellectual skills necessary for exemplary instruction by master teachers, administrators and emerging educators.” • ThinkTank7 – “Foundations Now”, June 6-9, 2012, Chicago IL • Website: integrativeteaching.org
  • 7. What are the outside forces?• 21st century learners• Shifting trends in higher education• Economy and job market
  • 8. 21st Century LearnersAccording to the study “A Vision of Students Today” and presentation “Teaching the 21 st Century Learner”• Social, like to learn in teams and in structured environment that affords flexibility• Better at reading visual images than reading• Comfortable with racial and ethnic diversity• There will be more women, older students, minorities, part time, veterans, working learners• Looking for fast response times leading to short attention spans• Multitasker, experiential, learn through exploration, need to be engaged• Demand things that matter, practical approaches in real world context• Desire learning options, personalized to learning strength, want to design own curricula• Demand more convenience; online, part time, off campus
  • 9. 21st Century LearnersTechnology• Digitally literate• Fascination with new technologies• Computers aren’t technology but are a way of life• Multimedia format is pervasive and they expect the same• Internet is the universal form of information• Students are frustrated by rules that inhibit their use of technology
  • 10. Institutional Missions and Learning Outcomes• Transdisciplinarity • Integrity• Collaboration • Diversity• Social Responsibility • Academic Excellence• Integrated Student • Community• Communication • Innovative technology• Critical Thinking • Respect• Innovation • Flexible learning• Creativity • Professional• Innovation development• Writing Skills • Life-long learner• Sustainability
  • 11. Economy and job market• Loss of federal and state funding, loans and aid• Uncertain level of international students• Cost of college is growing financial burden increasing the need to be accountable for the investment and employment – College is job training• High unemployment• Less high school art programs
  • 12. How Do We Respond?
  • 13. Emerging Conversations in Art/Design Foundation • Technology • Social Responsibility • Meaning • Art History
  • 14. Technology“In this age of technology, tactile, embodied experienceis ironically, potentially innovative”“Empowering innovation” breakout session ITI ThinkTank workshop, FATE Biennial“Today’s high-school students, the so-called NewMillennial’s, see their educational futures built almostentirely around technology.”June 2009 Study by Chronicle of Higher Education “The College of 2020: Students”
  • 15. Technology• Social media: Flikr, texting, Facebook, twitter, blogs, wiki’s• Online learning and hybrid classes• 4D – Time and Motion: art and design disciplines increasingly use time based media and movement
  • 16. Example From his paper in FATE in Review, volume 30 “The Multichronic Classroom: Creating an Engaging Classroom for All Students”The Multichronic ClassroomAnthony Fontana, Instructor of Art and Learning Technologies Consultant, Bowling Green StateUniversity, and current President of Integrative Teaching International• “Creation: Blogs replace the traditional journal, allowing the students to publish their creative brainstorming processes and critically analyze the research they find online.”• “Collaboration: A wiki, created by my students and me, replaces the textbook and gives the students’ artwork, exercises, and research an online home for the benefit of others.”• “Communication: The social networking site Facebook allows for more versatile out-of-class dialogue that is available “where” and when the students want it.”• “Interaction: The virtual world of Second Life allows for practical interaction with other professional artists from around the world.”• Also uses a Wii to teach arm movement in drawing
  • 17. Advantages• Relevant to student’s experience - engagement• Efficient – repetition, reiteration, communication• Movement• Relevant to skills and principles required in many majors
  • 18. Challenges• Expense – university or student• Keeping up with new technology• Faculty training• Space and logistics• Plagiarism issues and role of ownership• Faculty less an oracle than a guide to information
  • 19. Social Responsibility“What does it mean to say there is nowork when there is so much work to bedone?”Jasmine Aber, Institute of Urban Design and Regional Development andCenter for Global Metropolitan Studies“Problems turned into projects”Kim Yamuda, Art Department of California Santa Barbara
  • 20. Social Responsibility• Service learning, “Citizen Artist”• Community and collaboration• Meaningful purpose, not jobs• Participatory, Experiential learning• Sustainability
  • 21. Social Responsibility Learning Outcomes Jim Elniski, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Eileen Doktorski, Mt. San Jacinto College• Empathy • Leadership• Awareness • Communication of• Self-Esteem ideas• Self-confidence • Division of work• Purposefulness • Leadership• Community • Courage• Listening• Compromise
  • 22. ExampleOpen Container ProjectKim Yasuda, Professor of Spatial studies, ArtDepartment of California Santa Barbara• Distance learning versus Proximity research• First assignment: prepare a meal together• “Open Container” project• Friday Academy: “encourages flexible programming in response to immediate social and environmental concerns”• Class as artwork and exhibition as school
  • 23. Advantages• Serve and create community• Collaboration• More ambitious scale• Visibility• Learn through practical experience• Expand view• Learn responsibility and empathy
  • 24. Challenges• Individual assessment difficult• Unpredictable outcome• Liability and risk• Continuing new relationships afterward?• Funding
  • 25. Meaning“Don’t abandon skill but expand context”Maureen Garvin, Dean, School of Foundation Studies, Savanna College of Art and Design
  • 26. Meaning• Concept, themes and narrative• Mine personal experience for content• Critical thinking – learn how to learn• Conceptual and inquiry based skills cross fields and disciplines
  • 27. Example1artCOREDan Collins, Professor, 2D studio, Arizona StateUniversity• Inquiry based• Matrix combining the three components on assignments ie. Studio skill = time theme = protest and persuasion Methodology = collaborationhttp://www.asu.edu/cfa/wwwcourses/art/SOACore/homelive2.htm
  • 28. Example 2The Alfred LineMichelle Illuminato and Brett Hunter, AlfredUniversity• 5’ x 1 mile line is the focus of a freshman studio research course “which asks participants to study their world through experiential research and the exploration or creative ways to share this knowledge.”• “Explore, observe, collect, analyze, edit, organize, communicate”http://thelineproject.wordpress.com
  • 29. Example 3Concepts CourseSusan Meyer, Denver University – Four foundation courses: 2D Approaches, 3D Approaches,Drawing, Concepts• Concepts Course description: Two topics will be explored: “culture and context,” and “time, space and duration.” A greater complexity of studio activity will be stressed through collaborative exercises, and individual approaches to themes. Greater exploration of context and concept will be expected, with emphasis on visual communication and personal awareness.
  • 30. Example 4Reorganized School of Foundation StudiesSavanna College of Art and Design – only dedicated School of Foundation Studies in U.S.In addition to the usual courses:• Creative Thinking Strategies• Design III: Time• Drawing on a Theme• Drawing III: Content and Interpretationshttp://www.scad.edu/programs/foundation-studies/index.cfm
  • 31. Advantages• Student Engagement• Relevant to many departments• Address “technologically savvy, conceptually immature” student• Develop Integrated Student• Critical thinking skills
  • 32. Challenges• Distraction from core skills• Breaking the Bauhaus formalism paradigm
  • 33. Art History“today’s child is bewildered when he entersthe 19th century environment that stillcharacterizes the educational establishmentwhere information is scarce but ordered andstructured by fragmented, classifiedpatterns, subjects and schedules.” Marshall McLuhan1967What does this have to do with me?
  • 34. Art History• Survey of art history versus potentially more relevant modern era - depth versus breadth• Presence or absence of Design History in design curricula and who teaches it? Few Design History Ph.D. programs nationally• Diversity – non-western, feminist, multi-ethnic• Dwindling electives versus art history accreditation requirements
  • 35. Survey of Art Advantages• Verbal and visual vocabulary• Naturally interdisciplinary: math, english, culture, humanities, social studies• Looking at evolving themes and meaning• Context Survey of Art Challenges• Only painting, sculpture and architecture• Too much material – little depth or analysis• Not enough time for 20th century• Little discussion on process and materials• Many students pursue design majors• Learning needs are more practical• Less relevant to contemporary student
  • 36. ExampleNew Art history curriculumElizabeth Fowler – Syracuse University• All students take two courses: “20th and 21st Century Art in Context” “20th and 21st Century Design in Context”• Limits scope to 1850 – 2000 – in depth modern era: mechanization, commercialization, and sustainability• Able to discuss process and materials• Able to discuss issues and themes• Begin to see the relationship of art to design
  • 37. New Curriculum ExampleFirst Year Experience – Six, 8 week workshopsGary Setzer, University of Arizona“The focus of the program is to foster inventive and resourcefulstudents, who can express complicated ideas in a manner that is bothtechnically and conceptually sophisticated.”• Mapping – observational drawing (req.)• Space – 3D additive and reductive (req.)• Surface – color elements of design (req.)Three of the following:• Gaze – photo• Experience – 4D time• Amalgams – installation and mixed media• Propaganda – visual communication• Body – drawing the figurehttp://art.arizona.edu/students/first-year-experience/
  • 38. Challenges to Innovation• The need to assess and adapt – It may be difficult to gain approval for new foundation curricula, and once introduced, may not work as well or be accepted• Too much innovation may make articulation of transfer students more difficult• Already overstretched two or four year program requirements make the creation of departmental specific first year courses more attractive, and the dissolution of Foundation programs more attractive
  • 39. ConclusionGiven our vital role in the journey of the art/designstudent, and particular interdisciplinary nature ofFoundation programs, there is an opportunity to notonly respond to change but to lead it.
  • 40. Breakout Groups
  • 41. Breakout groups• Each group will be asked to address and present experiences, possible solutions, ideas or issues that come up from the discussion• Identify a scribe and presenter(s) for the group• Present a brief description for a new foundation assignment using the topic
  • 42. Breakout Groups1. The role of technology, social media, online learning, and motion/time in Foundation curricula2. The role of Social responsibility and collaboration in foundation curricula3. The role of themes or meaning as well as critical thinking in foundation curricula4. The role and scope of Art history in contemporary art and design Foundation Curricula

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