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Fate And Freewill In Oedipus The King
 

Fate And Freewill In Oedipus The King

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Discussion points on the theme of Fate & Freewill in "Opedipus the King".

Discussion points on the theme of Fate & Freewill in "Opedipus the King".

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  • Fate And Freewill In Oedipus The King — Presentation Transcript

    Fate and Freewill in Oedipus The King
    Presented By
    Wendy O’Brien, Elinda Peguese, Diane Poland, Nadine Samuel, Jacqueline Scott, Calana Smith, Gwendolyn Terry,
    and Michael Veach
    IMAGES AND REFERENCES
    Oedipus the King volunteers to
    solve the murder of King Laius,
    references freewill.
    Tiresias said “you bear your burdens, I’ll bear mine” and “what will come will come”, references fate.
    Jocasta saying “nothing human can penetrate the future, references fate.
    Jocasta’s suicide, references freewill
    Oedipus gauging out his eyes,
    references freewill
    Oedipus request to be exiled to the
    Cithaeron Mountains, references
    fate.
    CONTRAST AND IRONY
    King Laius and Oedipus try to control their fate.
    Oedipus is the rightful heir of Thebes.
    Oedipus is hailed as the blessed savior of Thebes but his actions brought the plague against Thebes. He ultimately curses himself by openly condemning King Lauis’s murderer.
    Oedipus can answer the riddle of the Sphinx but could not make heads or tails of his true identity from the Oracles prediction.
    Oedipus criticizes blind Tiresias as a prophet but losses his sight when he begins to understand his fate and the repercussions of his actions.
    CONTRAST AND IRONY
    Jocasta tries to convince Oedipus Tiresias knowledge is not important . However, she pushes Oedipus to the truth ultimately learning she married her biological son.
    Oedipus was sent to Cithaeron to die at birth but wishes to return to Cithaeron to die when his destiny and actions catches up to him.
    HEIGHTENING OF THE CONRAST AND IRONY
    Oedipus’ desire to solve the murder of King Laius.
    The confrontations between Oedipus and the seer Tiresias
    Jocasta’s role and actions in this drama
    Oedipus’ exile to Cithaeron
    THE TRADGEDY OF FATE AND FREEWILL
    Was the fall of Oedipus as a result of FATE or a consequence of his own FREEWILL?
    THE END OF KING OEDIPUS PROVOKE EMOTIONS OF FEAR AND PITY.
    The occasions of self-injury and suicide call to mind the tenacity of life. Oedipus chooses to fight desperately to control the fate spoken over his life.
    Tragedy~ an action that rises and falls because of a certain error.
    The innermost religious beliefs of the reader and audiences is challenged thus heightening the feeling of tragedy in Sophocles “Oedipus the King”.
    Dramatic unraveling of the fate of the idealized Oedipus.
    Three Secondary SOURCES’ reflection on the theme of “fate and freewill”
    Robert Fagles (1984) Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oedipus_the_King
    SuziNaiburg, Ph.D., L.I.C.S.W., Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16(4):445-463, 2006
    John A. Weigel,“Chapter 5: A Hidden God: Oedipus The King”. Sophocles. Ruth Scodel. Twayne World Author Series 731. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.
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Fate And Freewill In Oedipus The King Fate And Freewill In Oedipus The King Presentation Transcript

  • Fate and Freewill in Oedipus The King
    Presented By
    Wendy O’Brien, Elinda Peguese, Diane Poland, Nadine Samuel, Jacqueline Scott, Calana Smith, Gwendolyn Terry,
    and Michael Veach
  • IMAGES AND REFERENCES
    •  Oedipus the King volunteers to
    solve the murder of King Laius,
    references freewill.
    •   Tiresias said “you bear your burdens, I’ll bear mine” and “what will come will come”, references fate.
    •   Jocasta saying “nothing human can penetrate the future, references fate.
    •   Jocasta’s suicide, references freewill
       Oedipus gauging out his eyes,
    references freewill
    Oedipus request to be exiled to the
    Cithaeron Mountains, references
    fate.
  • CONTRAST AND IRONY
    • King Laius and Oedipus try to control their fate.
    • Oedipus is the rightful heir of Thebes.
    • Oedipus is hailed as the blessed savior of Thebes but his actions brought the plague against Thebes. He ultimately curses himself by openly condemning King Lauis’s murderer.
    • Oedipus can answer the riddle of the Sphinx but could not make heads or tails of his true identity from the Oracles prediction.
    • Oedipus criticizes blind Tiresias as a prophet but losses his sight when he begins to understand his fate and the repercussions of his actions.
  • CONTRAST AND IRONY
    • Jocasta tries to convince Oedipus Tiresias knowledge is not important . However, she pushes Oedipus to the truth ultimately learning she married her biological son.
    • Oedipus was sent to Cithaeron to die at birth but wishes to return to Cithaeron to die when his destiny and actions catches up to him.
  • HEIGHTENING OF THE CONRAST AND IRONY
    Oedipus’ desire to solve the murder of King Laius.
    The confrontations between Oedipus and the seer Tiresias
    Jocasta’s role and actions in this drama
    Oedipus’ exile to Cithaeron
  • THE TRADGEDY OF FATE AND FREEWILL
    Was the fall of Oedipus as a result of FATE or a consequence of his own FREEWILL?
    THE END OF KING OEDIPUS PROVOKE EMOTIONS OF FEAR AND PITY.
    The occasions of self-injury and suicide call to mind the tenacity of life. Oedipus chooses to fight desperately to control the fate spoken over his life.
    Tragedy~ an action that rises and falls because of a certain error.
    The innermost religious beliefs of the reader and audiences is challenged thus heightening the feeling of tragedy in Sophocles “Oedipus the King”.
    Dramatic unraveling of the fate of the idealized Oedipus.
  • Three Secondary SOURCES’ reflection on the theme of “fate and freewill”
    Robert Fagles (1984) Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oedipus_the_King
    SuziNaiburg, Ph.D., L.I.C.S.W., Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16(4):445-463, 2006
    John A. Weigel,“Chapter 5: A Hidden God: Oedipus The King”. Sophocles. Ruth Scodel. Twayne World Author Series 731. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.
  • Credits for the pictures used in this presentation
    http://fc.sad57.k12.me.us/~Abigail_Asciola/00598B79-00870BAD.0/bloodyeyes.jpg
    http://www.oddesseytheatres.com
    http://www.amrep.org/images/oedipus/sophocles.jpg
    http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/4658468/2/istockphoto_4658468-lady-justice.jpg
    http://www.unitedmaskandparty.com/Masks/images/tragedy_mask_decorated_dowel.JPG
    http://www.kirkwood.k12.mo.us/parent_student/KHS/arenske/images/oed_sphinx2.jpeg
    http://edweb.tusd.k12.az.us/ktully/images/Oedipus,%20Antigone/Alter%20Ego%20by%20Robert%20Crockett.jpg
    http://filipspagnoli.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/aristotle.jpg