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Going Multi-Tenant with dotCMS
 

Going Multi-Tenant with dotCMS

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ehc takes us on a tour of how they are leveraging dotCMS v1.9's advanced multi-tenant capabilities to manage 700 web sites that include; hospitals, outpatient facilities, physician practices and other ...

ehc takes us on a tour of how they are leveraging dotCMS v1.9's advanced multi-tenant capabilities to manage 700 web sites that include; hospitals, outpatient facilities, physician practices and other medical service organizations.

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    Going Multi-Tenant with dotCMS Going Multi-Tenant with dotCMS Presentation Transcript

    • Building a CRAPLOAD of Web Sites in dotCMS
    • OR Creating a Site Building Framework in dotCMS
    • WE ARE CURRENTLY CONVERTING 700 WEB SITES to dotCMS 1.9
    • CONVENTIONS are your friend
    • A connected base framework of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Velocity, and Containers that provide a solid foundation for all sites.
    • Why Conventions Are Awesome • Keeps your team on the same page • You can go into any project and understand what’s going on, even if you didn’t start it • You can go to edit an existing site and know exactly where to go to make changes • Speedy implementations of CSS, JavaScript, Velocity, and other cool stuff • Enables designers and project managers to implement complex functionality • Ensures quality control
    • How we're using conventions • “Pluggable” pieces • Sharing as much code as possible across hosts • Naming conventions • Folder structure • Browser Support, Graceful Degradation, Progressive Enrichment • jQuery minimalism • Project Stages and Basecamp
    • GLOBAL vs. LOCAL be lazy
    • In 1.9 everything lives self-contained on a host. Because the sites run on the same code base, this means that we would end up with lots of dupli- cate containers, vtls, CSS, and jQuery plugins.
    • Global Host • The host where we distribute all the global pieces of our site building framework. • Host CSS for base layouts, print styles, and mobile styles • Host jQuery plugins and other global JavaScript • Host all containers for velocity powered functionality and HTML • Global content delivery (CDN) • Host files referenced by widgets and containers used across sites
    • Basically, we come back to the age-old principle of being lazy. Do something once, and then reuse it a thousand times.
    • AND NOW AN EXAMPLE
    • St. Mark's Hospital
    • CSS GLOBAL HOST reset.css base.css print.css mobile.css ie6-reset.css LOCAL HOST screen.css ie7.css ie6.css
    • reset.css • resets all the annoying default styles that browsers love to add • provides a blank slate to start from • on global host and cached across all of our hosts
    • base.css and screen.css • controls basic layout • hosted globally • @ import the base of your choice for a layout • screen.css provides layer of typographic and graphic styling locally
    • print.css
    • ie6-reset.css • not all browsers, especially older ones, are going to see exactly the same design • providing a layer of content level support by using one stylesheet that provides a simple, usable design • using the same HTML naming conventions makes this really easy
    • mobile.css • User Agent detection • iPhone specific Meta tags • Currently works with iPhone, iPod, iPad (he he) and most other mobile browsers • Fully CSS-powered; no JS
    • jQuery
    • Omniture Analytics
    • Omniture Search • meta tag based indexing controlled by logic in the head container • giant content pull for indexing (site-map.dot) • xml based response • results page widget
    • ehc Components • Distributed across all our sites, tying into our global host. • similar to dotCMS’s Application widget • Versioning by structure. ehc Components v1 widgets, v2, v3 ... v#
    • Watch for more details on our blog.