Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Recent Reforms Background
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Recent Reforms Background

609

Published on

EDF 5607, …

EDF 5607,
Common Myth-Takes, Part I

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
609
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Transcript

    • 1. Common Myth-takes on Education Change, Part I (puns definitely intended) (multimedia for educational purposes and used from public sources)
    • 2. Topics
      • Deaths
      • Aging
      • Marriages & Divorce
      • Language
    • 3. Mortality changes
      • Declined broadly in last century. Measures:
        • Infant mortality rate
      Image from http://www.state.nj.us/health/bibs/education/1unsolved.html
    • 4. Mortality changes
      • Declined broadly in last century. Measures:
        • Infant mortality rate
        • Life expectancy ( not a predictive measure )
      Image from http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/measures/health.htm; its source: Source: Healthy People 2010 http:// www.health.gov/healthypeople /
    • 5. Mortality changes
      • Causes described by students
        • Medical technology, in general or…
          • Antibiotics
          • Prenatal interventions
        • Health care access and education
          • General education or health-care knowledge
          • Health care access, including prenatal
        • Nutrition
        • Hygiene
        • Abortion policies
    • 6. Mortality changes
      • Causes prominent in the literature
        • Public health measures (e.g., water supplies)
        • Private behavior (e.g., hand-washing)
        • Improved nutrition
        • Medical interventions (limited before 1940)
    • 7. Aging
      • Consequence of lower mortality regime and lower fertility ( except for the Baby Boom) .
      Image from http://www.umsl.edu/services/govdocs/erp/1997/chap3.htm
    • 8. Aging
    • 9. Population pyramids, US 1950 1970 1990 2000 Source: http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idbpyr.html
    • 10. Marriages and Divorces
    • 11. Romeo/Juliet myth
      • Shakespeare play, young marriage
      • Student responses when asked what proportion of young women (20-24) in late 19 th century U.S. would have been married tend to cluster above 70%.
    • 12. Romeo/Juliet myth incorrect
      • John Hajnal, older marriage in medieval Europe
      • Mary Louise Nagata, older marriage in 18th-19th-century Japan
      • In 1890 U.S. census, 48% of women 20-24 had ever been married. (85% of women 30-34).
      • In 1930, 54% of women 20-24 had ever been married
      • 1960: 72%
      • 1980: 50%
      Further reading: Edward Kain, The Myth of Family Decline
    • 13. Divorce
      • Popular image: increases beginning in 60s
      Source: National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau.
    • 14. Divorce
      • Reality, after correcting for period and proportion
      Source: National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau.
    • 15. Languages
      • Historical language use diverse
        • Diverse flow to North America from 17 th , 18 th centuries
        • Immigration in 19 th and early 20 th century continued pattern
      • Example: Texas, end of 19 th century (Blanton)
        • Student perceptions: Spanish, French, German, Native American (variety), Chinese
        • Most common languages: Spanish, German, Polish, Czech
    • 16. Languages
      • New immigration since 1965
        • After 41 years in closed-border policy
        • Variety of continental origins
        • Mix of status for national groups (Portes & Rumbaut)
        • Geographic dispersion
      • Example: Florida, today
        • 2000 census: Spanish, French Creole, other French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Tagalog
        • 2006-07 FDOE report: 221,979 English Language Learners, with 69 languages (95% with Spanish, Haitian-Creole, Portuguese, Vietnamese, French, or Arabic)
        • Different Spanish dialects reflecting geographic origins (Lopez et al.)
    • 17. Consequential questions/perspectives
      • Political discourse
        • Aging: Health care v. education
        • Family structure: who is responsible for education
        • Immigration and languages: assessment and accountability
      • Historical perspectives
        • High proportion of population < 18 does not guarantee high attention to education
        • Arguments about changing family structures are centuries old
        • Immigration debates centuries old

    ×