Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Class 6 ppt
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Class 6 ppt

883
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
883
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1
  • 2. 2
  • 3. Combo  -­‐  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Klout,  Twi8er,  iTunes/Spo<fy,  Meetup,  Flipboard,  Tumblr,  Infographics,    and  YouTube    Concerts  –  based  on  music  selec<on   3
  • 4. Listening  –  using  the  “groundswell”  for  research  and  to  be8er  understand  your  customers  (e.g.  for  use  in  marke<ng,  development)    Story  –  Perry  and  M.D.  Anderson  (best  reputa<on/technology,  but  they  make  you  wait  2-­‐4  hours)  So,  they’ve  invested  major  efforts  to  improve  scheduling   4
  • 5. What  do  your  customers  think  your  brand  is  about?  One  way  to  find  out:  listen.  What  you  say  vs.  what  you  do    M.D.  Anderson  –  private  community  through  Communispace  –  ask  ques<ons  (how  do  you  make  treatment  decisions,  what’s  on  your  mind  etc.),  listen  in  as  they  talk  to  each  other  and  learn  how  they  think,  etc.  =  current,  con<nuous  insight  on  demand.   5
  • 6. Market  research  –  good  at  finding  answers  to  ques<ons,  but  not  so  good  at  insights  Companies  pay  over  $15  billion  annually  for  MR  –  e.g.  condi<ons  that  doctors  are  diagnosing,  which  drugs  are  prescribed  to  whom    Syndicated  research  –  mapping  trends,  but  not  what  people  are  thinking  Surveys  –  only  about  the  ques<ons  you  ask  (can’t  tell  you  what  you  never  thought  to  ask)  Focus  groups  –  spontaneous  reac<on,  but  lucky  if  you  get  really  good  insights    All,  very  expensive  –  e.g.  $100K  for  a  survey/analysis   6
  • 7. Listen  in  natural  environment  (normal,  day-­‐to-­‐day)  –  avoid  limita<ons  of  other  research  methods    Volume  –  drinking  from  a  firehose   7
  • 8. Google:  your  company  or  product  name  +  sucks  or  awesome  These  simple  tools  work  for  SMBs,  but  they  don’t  scale  for  large  enterprises    1.  Like  a  con<nuously  running,  huge,  engaged  focus  group  (natural  interac<on,  you  can  listen)  2.  Hire  a  company  to  listen  and  deliver  insights/reports;  share  results  with  departments;     8
  • 9. Challenge  –  Marke<ng  represents  3.5  employees  of  9,000  company-­‐wide    $275K/year  –  she  convinced  other  cancer  centers  to  take  part    Gij  cards  –  but  ALSO  value  in  the  community  (support,  answers,  connec<ons)   9
  • 10. Challenge  –  Marke<ng  represents  3.5  employees  of  9,000  company-­‐wide    $275K/year  –  she  convinced  other  cancer  centers  to  take  part    Where  to  get  treated  –  consider  their  mindset  (fear,  mix  of  emo<ons,  stress  –  not  capable  of  discussion,  trust  their  own  doctor)    Community  –  las<ng  value  vs.  surveys  (one-­‐way)  E.g.  Most  discussions  started  by  the  community    Learn  –  what  they  look  for  (even  keywords)  and  how  they  use  the  info.  they  find  (e.g.  personal  guide  to  cancer  resources  on  the  Internet)    Internet  –  doctors  hate  it,  but  they  must  embrace  it    Ongoing  –  community  is  on  call  (vs.  selng  up  focus  groups,  surveys)   10
  • 11. 1.  Axe  body  spray  ads  ring  true  because  of  Communispace  research  2.  Investment  thinking  starts  at  checking  account.  Redesigned  website  and  launched   high-­‐yield  checking  account  3.  Made  tool  more  flexible  and  easy  to  use  -­‐  10%  increase  in  sa<sfac<on   11
  • 12. Vs.  Volkswagon  and  Honda,  everything  revolves  around  new  models  (PR,  buzz,  sales)  Mini  had  the  same  cars  as  last  year    Opp  –  but  what  did  they  love  and  how  could  Mini  take  advantage   12
  • 13. 13
  • 14. This  looked  nuts  –  spend  money  on  people  who  have  already  bought    Online  promoter  score  –  online  cha8er  à  recommenda<ons  à  sales  the  following  month     14
  • 15. Listening  –  most  neglected  skill  in  business  (used  to  be  much  harder,  now  much  easier)    6  reasons  why  1.  Your  message  vs.  what  people  are  saying  2.  Establish  a  baseline  –  from  you  to  compe<tors,  from  style  to  your  high  prices;   also,  find  people  with  problems  and  address  them  directly  (e.g.  Dell)  3.  Budget  alloca<on  –  tradi<onal  research  to  listening  (or  to  supplement  it)  4.  Iden<fy  and  cul<vate  them  5.  Hear  about  it  earlier  if  you’re  listening  (early-­‐warning  system,  respond  before   things  get  out  of  hand)  6.  Free  ideas  –  e.g.  new  features,  packaging,  new  marke<ng  message   15
  • 16. Generally  starts  in  research  or  marke<ng  department  –  but  can  apply  for  customer  service,  sales,  etc.    1.  Listening  most  effec<ve  when  customers  are  already  in  the  groundswell  (esp   creators/cri<cs)  results  can  dictate  private  comm  vs.  brand  monitoring  2.  E.g.  start  with  a  single  brand  (save  costs  and  build,  graduate  the  complexity)  3.  Team  of  analysts  –  create,  manage  and  understand  the  info.  4.  Exploit  the  info.  –  read  reports,  interface  with  vendor,  and  suggest  new  info.  to   retrieve;  integrate  results  with  other  research   16
  • 17. Once  you  listen  and  act  on  the  info,  your  company  will  never  be  the  same  1.  Department  will  become  more  central  to  how  decisions  are  made   1.  Important  to  communicate  what  you  learn  in  ways  they  can  understand   (avoid  conflict);  turn  insight  into  change  2.  Like  a  drug  –  instant  availability,  addic<on   1.  Integrate  results  into  corporate  decision-­‐making  3.  Every  company  has  stupid  products,  policies  and  org  quirks  (execu<ve  bias,   process/systems,  tradi<on);  listening  “relentlessly  reveals  your  stupidity”  and  it   woll  be  hard  to  deny  your  flaws  (honest  and  accurate  customers,  measure   complaints)  4.  Enter  into  the  conversa<on  –  next  chapter   17
  • 18. 18
  • 19. Every  marke<ng  has  a  medium  –  ads  have  TV/etc,  WOM  has  people    Good  WOM  program  is  built  on  finding  and  taking  care  of  your  talkers  –  4  steps   19
  • 20. Wynn  -­‐  cabbies  –  know  where  to  eat,  gamble  shop    We  turn  to  people  like  ourselves  for  advice  Same  needs,  same  lifestyle  –  not  a  paid  celebrity  endorser    Prostate  Net  –  educa<on  minority  men  about  risks  of  prostate  cancer  and  gelng  exams  50,000  barbers  –  reached  out,  taught  them  how  to  talk  to  clients  about  the  issue,  and  gave  edu  resources  to  pass  along    Five  Ts  –  talkers  (barbers),  topic  (importance  of  prostate  cancer),  tool  (info  brochures  and  other  edu  materials),  take  part  (establishing  dialogue  with  barbers),  and  tracked  the  results  (frequency  of  prostate  exams)    New  customer  –  restaurant;  don’t  think  to  men<on  the  ones  you  visit  most  frequently.  But  new  restaurant  –  you  tell  everyone.  HUGE  to  turn  these  new  customers  into  brand  advocates.  “Honeymoon  period”   20
  • 21. Everything  starts  with  the  RIGHT  talkers  –  then,  you’ll  know  the  topics,  which  tools  to  use,  how  to  join  the  convo    1  –  fill  out  comment  cards,  learn  employee  names,  visit  frequently,  sign  up  for  newsle8ers,  submit  sugges<ons  online,  comment  on  your  message  boards  or  email  you…easy  to  get  annoyed,  but  teach  employees  to  leverage  their  excitement  2  –  reviews,  raves  –  they’re  asking  for  a8en<on  4  –  team  spirit,  bumper  s<ckers,  etc.  5  –  they  listen  –  likely,  they’ll  talk  6  –  perfect  for  these  industries:  cars,  computers,  music,  movies  and  luxury  goods.  Example  –  book  review  woman  (16K  reviews  on  Amazon)  7  –  reporters,  journalists,  columnists,  full-­‐<me  bloggers,  business  networkers,  variety  of  experts  and  authors  (example  –  Oprah  book  club,  “favorite  things”)     21
  • 22. Great  talkers  share  the  following  traits:    Passion  –  excited  about  your  stuff  and  generally  about  life  (care  about  the  topic,  invest  their  <me  in  it,  and  have  strong  opinions)  Credibility  –  devoted  enough  to  impress  others.  cashier  or  pharmacist  when  asking  for  a  painkiller  (same  #  of  people  in  a  day,  but  pharm  has  the  rep)  –  look  for  people  devoted  enough  to  the  topic  to  impress  others.  E.g.  if  you  dress  fashionably,  people  ask  you  ab  fashion  Connec<ons  –  members  of  clubs,  volunteer,  on  a  team,  many  online  friends,  etc.  Opportunity  –  people  in  situa<ons  where  they  will  have  many  interac<ons  w  other  people  (e.g.  travelers)    Not  just  about  #  of  followers     22
  • 23. Who  they  are  +  what  will  get  them  talking  Example  –  page  84  (ABC  Day  Care)  –  ajer-­‐work  babysilng  program   23
  • 24. Now  that  you  know  WHO  talkers  are,  need  a  way  to  talk  to  them    1  –  when  someone  in  the  store  shows  enthusiasm  or  someone  blogs  about  you  (coupon,  special),  ask  (e.g.  VIP  list,  insider  info  etc.)  2  –  email  newsle8er,  community,  blog,  paper  newsle8er  –  just  for  your  talkers,  simple/ongoing  message-­‐delivery  system   24
  • 25. Exclusive  –  be  sure  talkers  are  first  to  know  (e.g.  broadway  hit  musical  –  email  thank  you  ajer  the  show  for  people  to  look  good  in  front  of  their  friends,  coupon,  photos,  downloads  etc.)   25
  • 26. Take  a  lesson  from  grassroots  organiza<ons    Case  study  –  page  89  (Family  Guy)   26
  • 27. They  deserve  a  li8le  thanks!  –  cement  their  emo<onal  connec<on    Don’t  be  s<ngy  Not  gijs,  compensa<on,  rewards  –  deep-­‐seated,  emo<onal  desire  to  connect  with  you  Sernovitz  –  100  thank  yous  each  month  Allen  Edmonds  –  hand-­‐wri8en  thank  you  for  each  purchase  MediaTemple  –  credit  for  month’s  worth  of  free  service  (w/o  any  formal  referral  program)  Angie’s  List  –  lb.  of  M&Ms  for  referring  the  site    Cool  experience  –  they’ll  tell  people  about  it  Lifeway  Chris<an  Services  –  send  an  ecard  and  enter  loca<on  of  who  you’re  sending  to.  pins  (on  a  map)  for  each  person  you  send  one  to  +  who  they  send  one  to  –  visual  representa<on  of  how  they  were  spreading  word  around  the  world;  mo<va<on  to  fill  map  Facebook  page  –  recent  fans  (welcome  them)     27
  • 28. Fan  club,  ambassador  program  1.  Weekly  newsle8er,  membership  card,  screen  savers  and  video  games  2.  Fiskars,  scissors,  craze  for  scrapbooking,  blogs,  message  boards,  annual  mee<ngs  3.  Name  on  a  barrel  of  bourbon,  personal  emails  from  the  CEO,  invites  to  private  par<es  around  the  country,  bar  glasses,  holiday  cards  to  send  to  friends,  pledge   28
  • 29. 1.  HD  -­‐  Rallies  –  mission:  ride  and  have  fun,  statewide  and  na<onal  (gives  them   something  new  to  talk  about)  2.  Microsoj  MVP  -­‐  Page  98  3.  eBay  Live!  –  once/year  conven<on  Sojware  companies  –  developer  conferences    Get  them  together,  pumped  up,  and  give  a  reason  to  talk    Match.com  –  meetups    Simple  events  to  get  them  talking  –  cocktail  party,  live  music,  tas<ngs,  book  readings,  etc.   29