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Superintendent's Presentation 2012

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Dr. DiSanti's Presentation

Dr. DiSanti's Presentation

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  • 1. Education in West Allegheny:Celebrating Our Successes . . . Facing Our Challenges
  • 2. Public School Enrollment 2
  • 3. EnrollmentMcKee 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003Kindergarten 72 86 88 71 71 76 88 113 681st 105 91 75 76 82 95 114 83 982nd 95 81 82 83 93 117 89 102 873rd 79 80 85 93 115 89 95 94 1004th 82 88 94 116 88 101 95 102 925th 92 97 109 88 102 100 104 89 88Total 525 523 533 527 551 578 585 583 533WilsonKindergarten 77 61 60 75 72 60 84 69 861st 73 67 82 76 67 87 71 103 732nd 71 80 69 69 82 78 104 68 933rd 82 70 71 87 77 99 66 95 974th 76 68 94 81 101 69 90 102 785th 65 95 80 103 70 90 100 73 96Total 444 441 456 491 469 483 515 510 523DonaldsonKindergarten 70 67 78 73 61 70 64 71 591st 76 83 82 66 83 71 79 63 632nd 84 83 67 84 62 81 56 65 663rd 82 67 88 70 89 55 69 65 574th 66 86 70 86 57 66 73 55 695th 87 69 88 57 68 76 53 74 67Total 465 455 473 436 420 419 394 393 381 1434 1419 1462 1454 1440 1480 1494 1486 31437Elem. Total
  • 4. Enrollment 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003WAMS6th 264 278 255 247 269 259 249 260 2327th 273 258 251 265 269 248 256 233 2898th 260 253 278 270 255 256 237 288 257Total 6-8 797 789 784 782 793 763 742 781 778 (’94- 647)WAHS9th 248 289 276 260 256 248 285 264 25610th 283 271 247 254 245 272 266 256 25311th 259 245 245 240 273 247 258 247 23612th 246 254 234 259 251 234 235 229 244Total 9-12 1036 1059 1002 1010 1025 1001 1044 996 989 (‘94- 736) 4
  • 5. ProgramEnhancements 5
  • 6. Program EnhancementsElementary Primary Intervention Program and Elementary Math ResourceProgram refined to follow Response to Intervention Model. Elementary Primary Intervention Program DIBELS assessment to students grades K-1, evaluates early literacy skills, e.g., initial sound fluency, letter naming fluency, phoneme segmentation fluency, nonsense word fluency, and oral reading fluency; Frequent remedial services address systematic, research based phonemic awareness and phonics instruction to at-risk readers with progress monitoring guiding instruction Elementary Math Resource Program End of year math assessments assess student mastery of grade level curricula; Scantron and PSSA test data also identify at-risk learners; remedial services address deficient mathematical skills and concepts with progress monitoring guiding instruction 6
  • 7. Program EnhancementsAll district curricula revised aligned with PA standards, PA assessmentanchors/eligible content, national standards, and content specific research basedpractices English as a Second Language Family and Consumer Science Health and Physical Education Information and Communications Technology Language Arts Library Science Life Skills Math Music Preschool Science Social Studies Technology Education Visual Arts World Language 7
  • 8. Program EnhancementsExpansion of advanced placement course offerings: AP Language and Composition AP Literature and Composition AP Studio Art AP Calculus AB AP Statistics AP Chemistry AP Physics B AP Economics AP Biology AP Government AP Psychology 8
  • 9. Program EnhancementsAccelerated Reading ProgramProject Lead the Way for the HS technology education program continues.Courses will off pre-engineering opportunities in a hands-on instructionalenvironment. New courses include Digital Electronics and ComputerIntegrated Manufacturing.Newly introduced courses: 3-D Animation, Career and Personal Success,Advanced FoodsEdline utilized in grades kindergarten through 12 during the 2011-2012academic year replacing traditional paper/pencil report cards.Smart School Literacy Centers utilized in grades K-5 as a tool todifferentiate reading instruction and offer Tier 2 instruction through theRTI model.District math department to utilize Scantron’s Achievement Series todetermine mastery of math curriculum. The Achievement Series utilizedto design grades 5-7 placement exams for the Pre-AP classes. 9
  • 10. Program EnhancementsPre-AP reading/English courses in grades 6-8A full year of world language in grade 8A redesigned exploratory class block to promote intensive studies inResearch/Inquiry and Health with an increase of instructional time from30 periods to 36 periodsCore academic courses scheduled before 9th period in order to benefitstudents involved in extra-curricular activities 10
  • 11. Program EnhancementsTextbook Adoptions: MS Science (Holt) HS Science (Misc. classes/publisher) K-5 Social Studies (Harcourt) 6-12 Social Studies (Holt) K-5 Math (McGraw Hill) MS Math High School Math (Misc. classes/publishers) 11
  • 12. Program EnhancementsDistrict Homework Policy revised to address: purposes of homework time guidelines management of homework demands communication of homework policy and guidelines additional support to assist studentsDistrict Grading Policy revised to be consistent with current research andsound educational practices by addressing: calculation of grade point average for weighted courses calculation of class rank grading scale comparisons with other progressive districts assignment of extra credit elementary report card revisions following a modified Standards-based format 12
  • 13. Program EnhancementsProfessional Development has included:Progress monitoring Edline trainingAccelerated Reader AutismOlweus Anti-Bullying Training DiversityStandards Aligned System (SAS) site use Safari MontageDifferentiated reading strategies Tier II InstructionGrade level meetings Emetric trainingSegmenting text to enhance comprehensionCo-teaching/reading information textTechnology (Use of Smartboards, Videostreaming, Use of I-Pads)Curriculum, instruction, and assessment trainingOverview of formative/summative assessmentLiteracy training PQ4R, Extended response, Differentiated lessons, Literacy centers, Creation of literacy mini-lessons 13
  • 14. Technology1427 Desk Top Computers336 Laptop Computers104 Projectors105 Promethean or Smart Boards67 Ipads57 Printers16 Copiers2 Document CamerasInternet ConnectivityExpansion of Wireless NetworkSafari Montage 14
  • 15. WA Virtual AcademyKindergarten – 12 opportunity to attend full-time cyber school.Online course offerings consistent with West Allegheny curricula andcourse expectations through synchronous place and asynchronousdelivery.Students who complete program requirements awarded WestAllegheny Diploma.Online options available to West Allegheny High School studentspursuing courses not currently offered.Online courses available to West Allegheny Kindergarten-12 studentsreceiving Homebound Instruction. 15
  • 16. School Corporate PartnershipsChoices – Pittsburgh Chamber of CommerceUniversity of Pittsburgh – School Leadership Bayer Corporation Dicks Sporting Goods West Allegheny Foundation Grable Foundation 16
  • 17. Keystone ExamsImplementation begins during 2012-2013End of Course Exams include Biology, Algebra, and Literature. May betaken twice to demonstrate proficiencyStudents identified as advanced, proficient, basic, or below basicThis year’s 7th grade students responsible for passing all exams tograduate in 2017Students taking Algebra this year will be “grandfathered”, notresponsible for taking exam next yearStudents not demonstrating proficiency will receive supplementalinstructionFollowing supplemental instruction, students will complete onlineproject based assessments in non-proficient areas and must pass tograduate 17
  • 18. Support Services 18
  • 19. Buildings and Grounds Director – Mr. Kenneth Fibbi Total Staff – 41 679,100 Square Feet of Space(includes 52,815 square feet added to HS) 198 Acres of Grounds Six Athletic Fields 19
  • 20. Food Services Director – Jim Sheridan Total Staff - 27 2010 - 2011 Statistics• 283,242 lunches• 67,709 breakfasts• $1,208,763 revenue (1.1% increase)• 23.4% of lunches/free or reduced 20
  • 21. Transportation Director – George Safin Secretary - Veva Tessmer Monark Transportation – Scott Stover 61 Busses 24 – 84 passengers 9 – 72 passengers 3 – 48 passengers 22 – mini-busses 2 – wheel chair vehicles 4,910 miles per day or 898,530 miles per year. 25,000 miles for activity runs. 21
  • 22. The Funding Dilemma 22
  • 23. School Funding in PennsylvaniaPA Spends $9 billion on K-12 Education in 2011-12PA Ranks 47-50 out of 50 in State Support PA Contributes 36% (WA – 23%) Local Taxpayers 63% (WA – 76%) Federal 1% (WA – 1%) Public education is 34% of state budgetCost of Instruction On Avg.- $9,000/student ($6,000 - $16,000) $13,700/student with capital outlay, debt service, transportation7 hours a day – 180 days per year $7.14 per hour $10.85 per hour $49.81 per day instruction and related costs 23
  • 24. School Funding in PennsylvaniaAre Schools Successful? Jan 2012 Education Week PA 7th out of 50 in student achievement Nov 2011 College Board AP Honor Roll 2011 PSSA – 94% of Public School Met AYB under NCLBA 24
  • 25. Impact of State Funding Reductions$860 million of cuts in 2011-12 (WA = $608,033)Additional $100 million of cuts in 2011-12 – ABG (WA = $100,000)2012-13 – 27.14 Billion Budget - $20 million less than 2011-12K-12 – $9.05 Billion – slight increaseMajor cuts in Higher Education 25
  • 26. Impact of State Funding ReductionsWhat Comprises Costs? Mandates Special Education Transportation Food Service Regulations Charter School Reimbursement Employee Pensions Testing/Curriculum Requirements ESL Prevailing wages for construction Curriculum Technology Textbooks Supplies Charter Schools 26
  • 27. School Funding in PennsylvaniaEmployee Costs – 62% - 65% Salaries and Benefits Pension costs escalation Employer PSERS Employee State/Investment Earnings 2011 – 12 2012-13 8.65% -- 12.36% = 42% increase - $320 million 2013 – 14 – 16.69% 2014 – 15 -- 21.18% 2019-20 – 28% 27
  • 28. The Charter School Dilemma$1 Billion spend 73,000 students$108 Million surplus in 2008-09Flawed funding formula (tuition rate) WA - $9,730.32 $18,347.95Underperforming only 2 of 12 “cyber” met AYP44% of Charters failed to meet AYP“Students in PA Charter Schools on average make smaller gains” (Center for Educational Opportunities (CREDO) Stanford University 2011)Lack of Accountability – Fiscal/Performance Source: PA Auditor General October 2010 28
  • 29. How Will Districts Balance Budgets? Class Sizes/Elective Courses Declining Enrollment Attrition Curtailment or Alteration of Programs Furloughs/Layoffs  Seniority Program Cuts Arts and Athletic Programs Pay to Participate Fees Tax Increase 29
  • 30. Millage Rate 21.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.00 22.00 Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Fiscal Year 2005-2006 2005-2006 2006-2007 2006-2007 2007-2008 2007-2008 2008-2009 2008-2009Beginning FundBalance $ 455,905 $ 455,906 $ 2,318,803 $ 2,318,803 $ 3,305,449 $ 3,305,449 $ 4,167,900 $ 4,167,900Revenues $ 42,591,316 $ 43,645,218 $ 43,447,248 $44,931,761 $ 44,613,325 $46,245,440 $ 47,141,807 $47,382,115Expenditures $ 42,591,311 $ 41,782,321 $ 44,622,052 $43,945,115 $ 46,418,097 $45,382,989 $ 48,094,203 $46,402,083 Difference $ 5 $ 1,862,897 $(1,174,804) $ 986,646 $ (1,804,772) $ 862,451 $ (952,396) $ 980,032Ending Fund Balance $ 455,910 $ 2,318,803 $ 1,143,999 $ 3,305,449 $ 1,500,677 $ 4,167,900 $ 3,215,504 $ 5,147,932Millage Rate 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Estimated Fiscal Year 2009-2010 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2011-2012 2011-2012Beginning FundBalance $ 5,147,932 $ 5,147,932 $ 5,851,500 $ 5,836,039 $ 8,424,471 $ 8,424,471Revenues $ 49,111,575 $ 48,994,732 $ 50,596,820 $53,303,331 $ 51,228,653 $52,000,000Expenditures $ 49,714,752 $ 48,291,164 $ 51,851,427 $50,714,899 $ 52,765,097 $52,000,000 Difference $ (603,177) $ 703,568 $(1,254,607) $ 2,588,432 $ (1,536,444) $ -Ending Fund Balance $ 4,544,755 $ 5,851,500 $ 4,596,893 $ 8,424,471 $ 6,888,027 $ 8,424,471 30
  • 31. Trend Analysis based on 2010-11 and 2011-12Millage Rate 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00Millage increase yr to yr 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00Fiscal Year 2011-2012 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16Beginning Fund Balance $ 8,445,408 $ 8,445,408 $ 7,006,286 $ 2,875,014 $ (2,634,334)Revenues $ 52,000,000 $ 52,437,115 $ 53,989,112 $ 55,506,996 $ 56,779,176ExpendituresSalaries $ 23,752,107 $ 24,417,204 $ 25,425,301 $ 26,338,884 $ 27,074,503Social Security $ 1,817,036 $ 1,867,916 $ 1,945,036 $ 2,014,925 $ 2,071,200PSERS $ 2,054,557 $ 3,017,966 $ 4,243,483 $ 5,578,576 $ 6,405,828Health Insurance $ 4,500,000 $ 4,706,152 $ 4,906,735 $ 5,087,239 $ 5,286,295Transportation $ 3,250,000 $ 3,339,375 $ 3,431,208 $ 3,525,566 $ 3,525,566Debt Service $ 7,094,252 $ 6,804,935 $ 8,154,253 $ 8,156,354 $ 8,160,434All Other Areas $ 9,532,048 $ 9,722,689 $ 10,014,369 $ 10,314,800 $ 10,624,244Expenditures $ 52,000,000 $ 53,876,237 $ 58,120,385 $ 61,016,344 $ 63,148,070Difference $ - $ (1,439,122) $ (4,131,273) $ (5,509,348) $ (6,368,894)Ending Fund Balance $ 8,445,408 $ 7,006,286 $ 2,875,014 $ (2,634,334) $ (9,003,227)Anatomy of a Cumulative Drawdown:Year to Year Net Expenditure Increase $ 1,439,122 $ 2,692,151 $ 1,378,075 $ 859,546Carryover of 2011-12 results of operations $ - $ - $ - $ -Carryover of 2012-13 fund balance drawdown $ 1,439,122 $ 1,439,122 $ 1,439,122Carryover of 2013-14 fund balance drawdown $ 2,692,151 $ 2,692,151Carryover of 2014-15 fund balance drawdown $ 1,378,075 31Total Fund Balance Drawdown $ 1,439,122 # $ 4,131,273 $ 5,509,348 $ 6,368,894