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02 sustainability 1
 

02 sustainability 1

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    02 sustainability 1 02 sustainability 1 Presentation Transcript

    • Discussions start this week: • Face-to-face in 176 Burrill Hall (Group A) • Online activities on IB105 Moodle site (Group B) https://moodle.life.illinois.edu/login/index.php IB105 Discussion Group A: AB1, AB3, AB5, AB7, AB9, ABB, ABD, ABF, ABJ, ABL IB 105 Discussion Group B: AB2, AB4, AB6, AB8, ABA, ABC, ABE, ABG, ABI, ABK, ABM
    •  
    • http://www.queenofthesun.com/ January 27, 2011 at 7:30 pm The Art Theater 126 West Church Street Champaign, IL 61820
    • Rebecca Huss , School of Law, Valparaiso University "The Evolving Nature of Animal Law,” Tuesday, February 15, 4:00 pm Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum, 600 S. Gregory, Urbana. Rebecca Huss will focus on emerging issues in animal law relating to companion animals.  Her talk will begin by defining "animal law" and discuss the development of this area of legal practice.  Other areas of the law that will be covered include housing issues, veterinary malpractice, how the law values animals, the role of service animals, custody and estate planning issues. ----
    • Sean B. Carroll , Molecular Biology, Genetics and Medical Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison "Remarkable Creatures:  Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species,” Tuesday, February 22, 4:00pm Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum, 600 S. Gregory, Urbana. The search for the origins of species has entailed a series of great adventures over the past 200 years.  This talk will chronicle the exploits of a group of explorers who walked where no one had walked, saw what no one had seen, and thought what no one else had thought.  Their achievements sparked a revolution that changed, profoundly and forever, our perception of the living world and our place within it.
    • Brian Handwerk January 19, 2011 Yellowstone Has Bulged as Magma Pocket Swells Some places saw the ground rise by ten inches, experts report. Yellowstone National Park’s supervolcano just took a deep "breath," causing miles of ground to rise dramatically, scientists report. The simmering volcano has produced major eruptions—each a thousand times more powerful than Mount St. Helens's 1980 eruption—three times in the past 2.1 million years. Yellowstone's caldera, which covers a 25- by 37-mile (40- by 60-kilometer) swath of Wyoming, is an ancient crater formed after the last big blast, some 640,000 years ago.
    • 23 January 2011 Brazil flood deaths top 800 with 400 still missing Officials in Brazil say more than 800 people are now known to have died in floods and landslides in the south-east of the country this month. More than 400 people are still missing after torrential rain caused whole hillsides to collapse. The flooding is considered the worst natural disaster Brazil has ever experienced.
    • January 24, 2011 Sustainability Lecture Objectives: 2. Understand the concept of Sustainable Development 3. Learn the five characteristics that define sustainability 1. Define the field of Environmental Science
    • Interdisciplinary What is environmental science?
    • Do you want: the air you breathe to be clean? the water you drink to be unpolluted? the food you eat to be healthy? not to be exposed to toxic wastes? Why study Environmental Science? Environment affects human quality of life Humans cause problems for the natural world
    • Human impact on the natural world
    •  
    • Sustainable Development
        • Viability of natural resources over time, and the maintenance of human living standards and economic growth.
      Sustainable Development – Meets present needs without compromising ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
    •  
    • Economics and Sustainable Development
      • Three schools of thought on the best way to achieve Sustainable Development:
      No need for change in fundamental economic policy
        • 1) Economic growth is necessary to finance pollution prevention
      Environmental issues are a matter of setting priorities
    • Economics and Sustainable Development
      • Three schools of thought on the best way to achieve Sustainable Development:
      No need for change in fundamental economic policy
        • 2) Science and technological advances can solve many environmental problems .
      Environmental issues are a matter of setting priorities
    • Economics and Sustainable Development
      • Three schools of thought on the best way to achieve Sustainable Development:
      Need for change in fundamental economic policy
        • 3) Economic and environmental well-being are mutually reinforcing, and must be pursued simultaneously.
      Economic growth will create it ’s own ruin if it environmental issues are not a priority
        • A) Economic growth is necessary to finance pollution prevention
        • B) Science and technological advances can solve many environmental problems .
        • C) Economic and environmental well-being are mutually reinforcing, and must be pursued simultaneously.
      Which school of thought is the best way to achieve Sustainable Development:
    • Economics and Sustainable Development The concept of sustainable development has been criticized for being ambiguous Criticism in part comes from a misuse of terms Sustainable growth and sustainable use are not interchangeable terms!
    • Economics and Sustainable Development
      • Sustainable growth is a contradiction – can ’t keep growing indefinitely
      • Sustainable use applies only to renewable resources – use them at rates within their capacity for renewal
    • Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources Renewable resource - can be formed or regenerated by natural processes Nonrenewable resource – cannot be replaced by natural processes, or those whose rate of replacement is exceptionally slow
    • Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources Renewable Nonrenewable Sunlight Wind Vegetation Animal Life Air Water Mineral resources Fossil fuels
    • Economics and Sustainable Development World-wide sustainable development is not easy to achieve. How to balance global sustainability with the local need to make a living?
    • How is Sustainability Achieved? Renewability – use renewable resources no faster than they can be replaced Outline by Gaylord Nelson, founder of the 1 st Earth Day
    • How is Sustainability Achieved? Substitution – when possible, use renewable resources instead of nonrenewable resources VS Can be difficult due to barriers to substitution (cost, society, etc.)
    • How is Sustainability Achieved? Interdependence – local communities recognize that the larger system must also be sustainable Does not get resources in a way that harms other communities, nor does it export waste
    • How is Sustainability Achieved? Adaptability – can change to take advantage of new opportunities Requires a diversified economy, educated citizens and a spirit of solidarity
    • How is Sustainability Achieved? Institutional commitment – adopts laws that mandate sustainability Economy supports sustainable production and consumption Citizens value sustainable behavior
    • Other Considerations in Ecological Economics External costs - Expenses, monetary or otherwise, borne by someone other than person using the resource For example, how do you put a price tag on the human health effects of pollution? Since difficult to quantify, often ignored in cost – benefit analyses
    • Other Considerations in Ecological Economics Common property resources – public ownership Common (public) ownership essentially means no owner.
        • Strong tendency to overexploit and misuse the resource.
        • Common ownership makes it virtually cost-free for anybody to cause pollution.
    • Ethics - Seeks to define fundamentally what is right and what is wrong, regardless of cultural differences. Morals - Reflect predominate feelings of a culture about ethical issues. Ethics and Morals Environmental ethics - Topic of applied ethics that examines the moral basis of environmental responsibility
    • Three primary theories of moral responsibility regarding the environment Anthropocentric : (Human centered) Responsibility derived from human interests
        • Only humans are morally significant
      Preservation for future consumption
    • Three primary theories of moral responsibility regarding the environment Biocentric : Life-centered rather than human centered
        • All life forms have a right to exist
      Animal Rights
    • Three primary theories of moral responsibility regarding the environment Ecocentric : Environment deserves direct moral consideration
        • The environment has an inherent value
      Advocated by Aldo Leopold
    • Ecocentric View “ A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise….We abuse land because we regard it as a community belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” - Aldo Leopold
    • Which theory of moral responsibility regarding the environment to you subscribe to? A) Anthropocentric : (Human centered) B) Biocentric : (Life centered) C) Ecocentric : (Environment centered) D) None of them
    • Individual Environmental Ethics Recognition of individual responsibility must lead to changes in individual behavior. Many want a cleaner environment, but do not want to make the necessary lifestyle changes
    • When raw materials are processed, some waste is inevitable.
        • Corporations - legal
        • entities designed to
        • operate at a profit.
      Corporate Environmental Ethics
    • Many consider manufacturing waste unethical, while corporations may see it as one factor determining profitability.
    • Corporate Environmental Ethics Practicing an environmental ethic should not interfere with corporate responsibilities. It makes little sense to preserve the environment if preservation causes economic collapse
        • Nor does it make sense to maintain industrial productivity at the cost of breathable air, clean water, wildlife, parks, and wilderness.
      Compromise is possible
    • Corporate Environmental Ethics
        • Nor does it make sense to maintain industrial productivity at the cost of breathable air, clean water, wildlife, parks, and wilderness.
      Who pays the costs? who reaps the benefits?
    • Environmental Policy Official rules and regulations that are adopted, implemented and enforced by a governmental agency. … . Needs to be based on best available science!
      • Points to know:
      • What are the 3 schools of thought on sustainable development? How are they alike and different?
      • Distinguish between sustainable development, sustainable growth and sustainable use.
      • Name some renewable and some nonrenewable resources.
      • Know Gaylord Nelson ’s 5 characteristics of sustainability.
      • How do external versus internal costs affect cost-benefit analyses?
      • 6. Know the three primary theories of moral responsibility
      • regarding the environment