The Standard of Academic Integrity

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The Standard of Academic Integrity

  1. 1. The University of Texas at Austin Introduction to Psychophysiology PSY 394U and NEU 394P Spring 10 Lectures: SEA 5.106 Wed 1-4pm Labs: SEA 3.312 and As Scheduled Organizing Instructor: David Schnyer Associate Professor of Psychology Office: SEA 5.246, Tuesday 10-noon Email: schnyer@psy.utexas.edu Phone: 512- 475-8499 Instructor: John Allen Professor of Psychology, University of Arizona Office: SEA 3.312 Email: jallen@u.arizona.edu Instructor: Logan Trujillo Post Doctoral Fellow Office: SEA 3.312 Email: trujillo@psy.utexas.edu Course Overview The use of physiological recordings to study psychological processes is extensive. This course will provide an overview of the principles, theory, and applications of using physiological measures to study mental processes. The course will begin by covering the philosophical and theoretical foundations of brain/behavior relations, followed by a short introduction to basic electrical principles and human neurophysiology in order establish an understanding of the sources and characteristics of the physiological signals that are recorded. This will be followed by a selection of 8 topics that will introduce students to major approaches to psychophysiological research, both techniques as well as specific research examples. Included in this presentation will be extensive practical examples of different approaches to signal processing, including newer methods in brain source localization. Finally, students will explore some of these techniques through 4, hands on, lab exercises.
  2. 2. Course Goals: The course has two main goals: a) to provide an introduction to theory and research in major areas of human psychophysiology and b) to provide an introduction to laboratory techniques and methodological principles in human psychophysiology. By the end of the course, students should have a good idea of the appropriate techniques that they could use in their own research programs. By the end of the course students should be able to read and understand research that uses any number of psychophysiological techniques with a sufficient foundation of knowledge to understand what was done and evaluate its scientific merit. Texts/Readings: Readings will be taken from two textbooks, the first of which is available online, through UT’s electronic library system. Readings taken from other sources will be available as PDFs on Blackboard. The main single source of readings for the course is: Cacioppo, J.T., Tassinary, L.G. , & Berntson, G.G (2007). Handbook of Psychophysiology (3rd edition). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. – http://www.utxa.eblib.com.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=293347 The other textbook is a programmed-learning text in basic electricity: Ryan, C.W. (1986). Basic Electricity: A Self-Teaching Guide (2nd Edition). New York: John Wiley and Sons. This book is out of print but Jenn’s Copy has obtained 6 copies of this book from Amazon and has them available for purchase. You should complete Chapters 1-5 of this programmed text. Assignments and Grading: Electricity Exam – 20% Class Participation – 10% Lab Participation and writeup– 30% Project presentation and final research proposal (10-15 pages, double spaced) – 40% The electricity exam - There will be a pass/fail test covering the material presented in class and in chapters 1-5. This will be administered at the beginning of class February 10th. You must score above 80% to pass; you may retake the test once. Labs participation and reports - Labs are required. After a short introduction, labs should be conducted with a partner. You will be responsible for a short, 1-page write up of what was done and what results were generated. These are due at the class period terminating that lab week.
  3. 3. Research Proposal - The research topic presentation and paper will be focused on a specific topic of interest chosen by the student. The topic proposal is due by March 10th . Students will construct a research proposal that uses one or more psychophysiological techniques. The proposal should consist of a background section introducing the topic followed by a set of specific aims that will be addressed by one or more proposed experiments. The methods for the experiments as well as the analysis approach should be presented in sufficient detail as to be assessed by a grant reviewer. The analysis approach should primarily be constructed to answer the questions posed in the specific aims. A conclusion will address the implications of possible findings as well as future directions. Course timeline and reading schedule - (subject to change with notification). - Indicates lab activities that will be introduced in the last hour of the session and must be completed within the week following Date Content Instructor Reading (online) Jan 20 Foundations: Using physiology to study psychological processes Schnyer 1 - Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 1 - Psychophysiological Science – Interdisciplinary approaches to classic questions about the mind 2 - The Mind-Body Problem – from The Psychology of Consciousness, G.W. Farthing Jan 27 Basic Electricity, Begin Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology Trujillo, Schnyer 1 - Chapter 1-5 in Ryan, C.W. (1986). Basic Electricity: A Self-Teaching Guide (2nd Edition). New York: John Wiley and Sons. Feb 3 Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology (cont) Schnyer 1 - Cellular organization of the nervous system – from Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology, B. Kolb and I.Q. Whishaw Eds 2 - Organization of the nervous system – from Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology, B. Kolb and I.Q. Whishaw Eds
  4. 4. Feb 10 Electrodermal Activity: Basics and Application to Polygraph Testing Allen 1 – Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 7 – The Electrodermal System. 2 - Lykken, D.T., Rose, B., Luther, B., & Maley, M. (1966). Correcting psychophysiological measures for individual differences in range. Psychophysiological Bulletin, 66, 481-484. 3 - Lykken, D.T., & Venables, P.H. (1971). Direct measurement of skin conductance: A proposal for standardization. Psychophysiology, 8, 656-672. 4 - Norris, C.J., Larsen, J.T., & Cacioppo, J.T. (2007). Neuroticism is associated with larger and more prolonged electrodermal responses to emotionally evocative pictures Psychophysiology, 44, 823-826. Feb 10- 17th Experiment 1: Skin- conductance Guilty Knowledge Technique Trujillo 1 - Lykken, D.T. (1959). The GSR in the detection of guilt. Journal of Applied Psychology, 43, 385-388. Feb 17 Cardiovascular Psychophysiology Allen 1 – Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 8 – Cardiovascular Physiology 2 - Bernston, G.G., Cacioppo, J.T., & Quigley, K.S. (1993). Respiratory sinus arrhythmia: Autonomic origins, physiological mechanisms, and psychophysiological implications. Psychophysiology, 30, 183-196. 3 - Shalev, A. Y., Sahar, T., Freedman, S., Peri, T., Glick, N., Brandes, D., Orr, S. P., & Pitman, R. K. (1998). A prospective study of heart rate response following trauma and the subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, 55, 553-559. 4 - Porges, S.W. (2007). The polyvagal perspective. Biological Psychology, 74, 116-143. 5 - O' Connor, M., Allen, J.J.B., & Kaszniak, A.W. (2005). Emotional disclosure for whom? A study of vagal tone in bereavement. Biological Psychology, 68, 135-146. Feb 17- 24 Experiment 2: Electrocardiographic (EKG) responses to stress Trujillo 1 - Allen, J.J.B., Chambers, A.S., & Towers, D.N. (2007). The many metrics of cardiac chronotropy: A pragmatic primer and a brief comparison of metrics. Biological Psychology, 74, 243–262. Feb 24 The Skeletomotor System Schnyer 1 – Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 12 – The Skeletomotor System: Surface Electromyography
  5. 5. 2 - Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 25 - Emotion and motivation 3 - Dimberg, U., Thunberg, M., & Elmehed, K. (2000). Unconscious facial reactions to emotional facial expressions. Psychological Science, 11, 86- 89. 4 - Ruiz-Padiala, E., Sollers, J.J., Vila, J, & Thayer, J.F. (2003). The rhythm of the heart in the blink of an eye: Emotion-modulated startle magnitude covaries with heart rate variability. Psychophysiology, 40, 306-313. March 3 The Electroencephalogram, Basics in Recording EEG, Frequency Domain Analysis and its Applications Schnyer 1 – Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 3 - Electroencephalography and High-density electrophysiological source localization March 10 Frequency Domain Analysis - Mood Disorders & Emotions Allen 1 - Coan, J.A. & Allen, J.J.B.. (2004). Frontal EEG asymmetry as a moderator and mediator of emotion. Biological Psychology, 67, 7-50. 2 - Light, S. N., Coan, J. A., Frye, C., Goldsmith, H. H. & Davidson, R. J. (2009). Dynamic variation in pleasure in children predicts nonlinear change in lateral frontal brain electrical activity. Developmental Psychology, 45, 525-533. 3 - Peterson, C.K., Shackman, A.J., & Harmon- Jones, E. (2008). The role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity in aggression. Psychophysiology, 45 (2008), 86–92. March 10-24 Experiment 3: Frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral changes Trujillo March 24 The Polysomnograph and Issues in Sleep Research Schnyer 1 - Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 27 – Sleep and Dreaming 2 - Carskadon, M.A., & Dement, W.C. (2005). Normal Human Sleep: An Overview. In M.H. Kryger, T. Roth, & W.C. Dement (Eds.), Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 4th edition, (pp 13- 23). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. 3 - Carskadon, M.A., & Rechtschaffen, A. (2005). Monitoring and staging human sleep. In M.H. Kryger, T. Roth, & W.C. Dement (Eds.), Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 4th edition, (pp 1359-1377). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. March The Event-Related Schnyer 1 - Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 4 – Event-
  6. 6. 31 Potential: Basics and Applications: N400 and LPC related Brain Potentials: Methods, theory, and applications 2 - Kutas, M. & Hillyard, S.A. (1980). Event-related potentials to semantically inappropriate and surprisingly large words. Biological Psychology, 11, 99-116. 3 - Schnyer, D. M., Allen, J. J. B., & Forster, K. (1997). An Event-Related Brain Potential Examination of Implicit Memory Processes: Masked and Unmasked Repetition Priming. Neuropsychology, 11, 243-260. 4 - Woollams, A. M., Taylor, J. R., Karayanidis, F., & Henson, R. N. (2008). Event-related potentials associated with masked priming of test cues reveal multiple potential contributions to recognition memory. J Cogn Neurosci, 20(6), 1114-1129. March 31-April 7 Experiment 4: Event- related brain potentials (ERPs) Trujillo April 7 More Applications of the ERP: P1/N1,P300, ERN Allen, Trujillo 1 - Donchin, E. (1981). Surprise!...Surprise? Psychophysiology, 18, 493-513. 2 - Johnson, R.J. (1986). A triarchic model of P300 amplitude. Psychophysiology, 23, 367-384. 3 - Gehring, W. J., Goss, B., Coles, M. G. H., Meyer, D. E., & Donchin, E. (1993). A neural system for error detection and compensation. Psychological Science, 4, 385-390. 4 - Trujillo, L. & Allen, J.J.B. (2007). Theta EEG dynamics of the error-related negativity. Clinical Neurophysiology. 118, 645-668. April 14 Magnetoencephlography and MEG source localization Schnyer TBA April 21 Advanced Signal Processing I Schnyer 1 - Handbook of Psychophysiology, J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, Berntson, Eds. Chapter 35 – Biosignal Processing 2 - Gratton, G., Coles, M.G.H., & Donchin, E. (1983). A new method for off-line removal of ocular artifact. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 55, 468-484. 3 - Cook, E.W., & Miller, G.A. (1992). Digital Filtering: Background and tutorial for psychophysiologists. Psychophysiology, 3, 350-367. 4 - Urbach TP. Kutas M. (2002). The intractability
  7. 7. of scaling scalp distributions to infer neuroelectric sources. Psychophysiology. 39, 791-808. April 28 Advanced Signal Processing II Trujillo 1 - Hyvarinen, A., & Oja, E. (2000). Independent component analysis: algorithms and applicatoions. Neural Networks, 13, 411- 430. 2- Makeig, S., Westerfield, M., Jung,T.-P., Covington,J., Townsend, J., Sejnowski, T.J., & Courchesne, E. (1999). Functionally independent components of the late positive event-related potential during visual spatial attention. Journal of Neuroscience, 19 (7), 2665-2680. 3 - Tallon-Baudry, C., & Bertrand, O. (1999). Oscillatory gamma activity in humans and its role in object representation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3(4), 151-162. 4 - Lachaux, J.-P., Rodriguez, E., Martinerie, J., & Varela, F.J. (1999). Measuring phase synchrony in brain signals. Human Brain Mapping, 8, 194-208. 5 - Spencer,K.M., Nestor, P.G., Perlmutter, R., Niznikiewicz, M.A., Klump, M.C., Frumin, M., Shenton, M.E., McCarley, R.W., & Llinas, R.R. (2004). Neural synchrony indexes disordered perception and cognition in schizophrenia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 101(49), 17288- 17293. May 5 Student Presentations of Final Projects The Standard of Academic Integrity A fundamental principle for any educational institution, academic integrity is highly valued and seriously regarded at The University of Texas at Austin, as emphasized in the standards of conduct. More specifically, you and other students are expected to "maintain absolute integrity and a high standard of individual honor in scholastic work" undertaken at the University (Sec. 11-801, Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities). This is a very basic expectation that is further reinforced by the University's Honor Code. At a minimum, you should complete any assignments, exams, and other scholastic endeavors with the utmost honesty, which requires you to: • acknowledge the contributions of other sources to your scholastic efforts; • complete your assignments independently unless expressly authorized to seek or obtain assistance in preparing them; • follow instructions for assignments and exams, and observe the standards of your academic discipline; and
  8. 8. • avoid engaging in any form of academic dishonesty on behalf of yourself or another student. For the official policies on academic integrity and scholastic dishonesty, please refer to Chapter 11 of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities. The University of Texas Honor Code The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the University is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. University Electronic Mail Notification Policy All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. Use of Blackboard in Class This course uses Blackboard, a Web-based course management system in which a password-protected site is created for each course. (Student enrollments in each course arc updated each evening.) Blackboard can be used to distribute course materials, to communicate and collaborate online, to post grades, to submit assignments, and to take online quizzes and surveys. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for class work and announcements. As with all computer systems, there are occasional scheduled downtimes as well as unanticipated disruptions. Notification of these disruptions will be posted on the Blackboard login page. Scheduled downtimes are not an excuse for late work. However, if there is an unscheduled downtime for a significant period of time, I will make an adjustment if it occurs close to the due date. Blackboard is available at http://courses.utexas.edu. Support is provided by the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400 Monday through Friday 8 am to 6 pm, so plan accordingly. Disability Statement Students who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259- voice or 471-4641 - TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to the instructor in each course at the
  9. 9. beginning of" the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind the instructor of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See Web site below for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php Religious Holidays Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify each of your instructors at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day. Feedback Feedback is an important part of any learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material or your proficiency in a skill, it is more difficult to make significant progress. During this course I will be asking you to give me feedback on your learning in informal as well as formal ways such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something we discuss is not clear. It will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.
  10. 10. beginning of" the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind the instructor of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See Web site below for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php Religious Holidays Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify each of your instructors at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day. Feedback Feedback is an important part of any learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material or your proficiency in a skill, it is more difficult to make significant progress. During this course I will be asking you to give me feedback on your learning in informal as well as formal ways such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something we discuss is not clear. It will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.

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