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Sources: www.purpleday.org and

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • prev- uh -l uh nce see ree bruhl outer layer of gray matter that covers the surface of the cerebral hemisphere. in memory , attention , perceptual awareness , thought , language , and consciousness .
  • en- sef - uh -l uh -gram rez- uh -n e ns
  • Maya clou nick uh ton ik
  • Depend on the seizure type, other medical conditions, the doctor treating the patient, costs
  • Characterised by stiffening, falling and jerking con vuhl sive
  • Starting blankly, confused, not responding.

Sources: www.purpleday.org and Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation Transcript

  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator What is Purple Day? A day dedicated to increasing awareness about epilepsy worldwide. On 26 th March, people from around the globe are encouraged to wear purple and spread the word about epilepsy. Why Purple? Lavender is the international colour for epilepsy. Who started Purple Day? Nine year old Cassidy Megan created the idea of Purple Day in 2008, motivated by her own struggles with epilepsy. With the help of The Epilepsy Association of Nova Scotia and the Anita Kaufmann Foundation, Purple Day was officially launched.
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Schools around the world wearing purple and spreading awareness.
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Different businesses and organisations as well encourage their employees to wear purple and spread awareness.
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator What is Epilepsy?
    • A condition of the brain that is characterized by spontaneous, recurrent seizures.
    • Prevalence: 0.5 - 1.0% of population
    • Can be caused by any pathology affecting the cortex (genetic, infectious, traumatic, vascular, etc.)
    • According to WHO
            • An estimated number of 50 million people are living with epilepsy and around 35 million have little or no access to treatment.
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Brain cells communicate with each other by means of tiny bursts of electrical activity. When a group of brain cells have an unexpected erratic electrical discharge, a seizure occurs. When do seizures occur?
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator The Diagnosis: Patient’s medical history is obtained. Patient is then tested. There are different types of tests that can be conducted including: EGG ( Electroencephalogram) MRI Scan ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Seizure Classification Epileptic Seizures Generalised Partial Simple Complex Absence Tonic-clonic Atonic Myoclonic Secondarily Generalized Secondarily Generalised
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Antiepileptic Drugs
    • Phenobarbital 1912
    • Phenytoin (Dilantin) 1938
    • Primidone (Mysoline) 1952
    • Carbamazepine (Tegretol)1960s
    • Valproic acid (Depakene) 1970s
    • NOTE: Plegabalin is not available in Canada
    • Since 1991:
    • Clobazam (Frisium)
    • Vigabatrin (Sabril)
    • Lamotrigine (Lamictal)
    • Gabapentin (Neurontin)
    • Topiramate (Topimax)
    • Oxcarbazepine (Trileptil)
    • Levetiracetam (Keppra)
    • Pregabalin
    • Stiripentol
    • Zonisamide
    • Since 2003:
    • Lacosamide (Vimpat)
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator First Aid for Convulsive Seizures
    • Remain Calm
    • Protect from further injury
    • Do not restrain movement
    • Do not force anything in the mouth
            • Roll the person on their side
    • If a seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes, or repeats without full recovery SEEK MEDICAL ASSISTANCE
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator First Aid for Non-convulsive Seizures
    • Stay with the person
    • Do not restrain, but gently guide the person away from danger
    • Observe carefully
    After All Types of Seizures Speak calmly, be comforting and reassuring. The person may be confused for 10-30 minutes after the seizure ends.
  • Sources: www.purpleday.org and Presentation made by Susan R. Rahey Neurophysiology Program Coordinator Wear Purple on March 26 th and support epilepsy awareness globally. Visit www.purpleday.org to find out more information about epilepsy.