• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Research Funding Opportunities: The Role of NIDA Program

on

  • 601 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
601
Views on SlideShare
601
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • New Pathways: This theme of the NIH Roadmap addresses the need to advance our understanding of the daunting complexity of biological systems. Future progress in medicine will require a quantitative understanding of the many interconnected networks of molecules that comprise our cells and tissues, their interactions, and their regulation Research Teams of the Future: NIH wants to stimulate new ways of combining skills and disciplines in both the physical and biological sciences Re-engineering the Clinical Research Enterprise is intended to address these pressing needs by promoting the better integration of existing clinical research networks, encouraging the development of technologies to improve the assessment of clinical outcomes, harmonizing regulatory processes, and enhancing training for clinical researchers. A major goal is to more fully involve and empower the public in the research process.

Research Funding Opportunities: The Role of NIDA Program Research Funding Opportunities: The Role of NIDA Program Presentation Transcript

  • Research Funding Opportunities: The Role of NIDA Program David Shurtleff, Ph.D. Director Division of Basic Neuroscience and Behavioral Research National Institute on Drug Abuse National Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services CPDD-- June 2006
  • Who/What is a Program Officer?
    • A Program Officer
      • is a scientist and administrator
      • manages grants, contracts, cooperative agreements
      • identifies needs in scientific areas
      • identifies scientific areas of special interest and communicates interest
      • monitors research progress
      • advocates for the best science
    • Attend study section
      • Listen to grant reviews
      • Observe review process
    • Works with applicants
    • Make funding recommendation
  • Application & Funding Process
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what?
    • Funding
    • Conclusions
  • The Application Process National Institutes of Health
  • Review Process for a Research Grant
    • Principal
    • Investigator
    School or Other Research Center National Institutes of Health Initiates Research Idea Conducts Research Submits application Allocates Funds Center for Scientific Review Scientific Review Group Institute Advisory Council or Board Program staff/ Assign to IC and IRG Review for Scientific Merit Evaluate for Relevance Recommend Action
  • Application & Funding Process
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • Submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what?
    • Funding
    • Conclusions
    • Before you apply for an NIH grant, contact a Program Officer
    Who are you going to call? A Program Officer
  • Before You Apply ……….. Talk With NIDA Staff and learn about:
    • Funding Mechanisms
    • Program Priorities
    • Grant Process
    • Application Procedure
    • Review Process / Committees
    • New Initiatives-
        • RFAs, PAs
  • NIDA National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Populations Office Division of Basic Neurosciences & Behavior Research Office of Extramural Affairs Office of Science Policy & Communications Intramural Research Program Division of Epidemiology, Services & Prevention Research Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse Center for the Clinical Trials Network Teresa Levitin, PhD Timothy Condon, PhD Betty Tai, PhD David Shurtleff, PhD Frank Vocci, PhD Wilson Compton, MD, MPE Barry Hoffer, MD, PhD Office of the Director Nora D. Volkow, MD Director Timothy P. Condon, Ph.D. Deputy Director Laura S. Rosenthal Associate Director for Management Division of Clinical Neuroscience & Behavioral Research Joseph Frascella, PhD Director, AIDS Research Office of Planning & Resource Management Laura Rosenthal
  • http://www.nida.nih.gov/about/organization/Organization.html
    • Framework to enhance cooperative activities among 16 NIH Institutes and Centers
    • Take on challenges in neuroscience that are best met collectively
    • Develop research tools and infrastructure that will serve the entire neuroscience community
    • Research Training Programs
  • NIH Roadmap FOR Medical Research
    • TransNIH initiative for a more efficient and productive system of medical research
    • Identifies in three main areas for support:
      • New pathways to discovery
      • Research teams of the future
      • Re-engineering the clinical research enterprise
  • Application & Funding Process
    • Grant success rates
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • Submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what?
    • Funding
    • The B/START mechanism
  • Mentored Career Development Awards
    • Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01)
    • Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Award (K08)
    • Career Transition Award (K22)
    • Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23)
    • Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award (K25)
    • NIH Pathway to Independence (PI) Award (K99/R00)
  • Features of the Mentored Career Awards
    • Purpose:
      • Provide applicant with professional degree three-five years of additional supervised research
      • Training must be in an area new to the applicant and/or one in which additional supervised research experience will substantially add to the research capabilities of the applicant
      • Focus on progression to independence: The candidate must provide a plan for achieving independent research support by the end of the award period
    • Allowable Costs:
      • Annual Salary $48,000-$90,000
      • Research Development Support up to $50,000 per year
  • “ K”-- Review Criteria
  • Review Criteria for Mentored Career Development Awards
    • Candidate:
      • Quality of the candidate's research, academic and/ or clinical record
      • Potential to develop as an independent researcher; and commitment to a research career
    • Career Development Plan:
      • The content, phasing, and duration of the plan
      • Consistency with the candidate's career goals
      • Likelihood the plan will contribute to achieving of scientific independence
    • Research Plan:
      • Methodology
      • Relevance to the candidate's career objectives
      • Appropriateness of the plan to the stage of research development
      • As a vehicle for developing research skills for career development
  • Review Criteria for Mentored Career Development Awards
    • Mentor/Co-Mentor:
      • Research qualifications
      • Quality and extent of mentor(s) role in providing guidance
      • Previous experience in fostering the development of researchers
      • History of research productivity
      • Adequacy of support for the proposed research project.
    • Environment and Institutional Commitment :
      • Adequacy of research facilities and training opportunities
      • Quality of the environment for scientific and professional development
      • Institution's commitment to candidate--assurances that the institution intends the candidate to be an integral part of its research program
      • institution's commitment to an appropriate balance of research and other responsibilities including 75% effort proposed by the candidate.
  • Mentored K Awards Success Rates
  • Number of Mentored K-Awards Received and Funded (NIDA-FY 05) (42%) (80%) (45%) (40%) (50%)
  • Dollars Obligated New Mentored K-Awards (NIDA-FY05)
  • Research Funding Mechanisms to Become an Independent Scientist
  • Research Mechanisms
    • Investigator Initiated Research Grant (R01)
    • NIDA B/START & I/START
      • One year award
      • Provide newly independent investigators an opportunity to conduct small scale exploratory (i.e., pilot) research
      • Establish a rapid review and funding to “jump start” research
    • Small Grant Program (R03)
      • Pilot or feasibility studies
      • Secondary analysis of existing data
      • Small, self-contained research projects
      • Development of research methodology or new research technology
    • Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Award (R21)
      • Test feasibility of a novel area of investigation
      • Studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough that could have major impact on a field.
  • Review Criteria
    • 1. Significance Address an important problem? Will scientific knowledge or clinical practice be advanced? What will be the effect of these studies on the field?
    • 2. Approach Are the design, methods, etc. adequately developed, well integrated, reasoned, and appropriate to the project? Are potential problem areas considered and alternative tactics proposed?
    • 3. Innovation Is the project original and innovative? Challenge existing paradigms; address an innovative hypothesis or critical barrier to progress in the field? Employ novel concepts, approaches, etc?
    • 4. Investigators Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience level of the PI and other researchers? Does the team bring complementary and integrated expertise to the project (if applicable)?
    • 5. Environment Does the scientific environment contribute to the probability of success? Do the proposed studies benefit from the scientific environment, or subject populations, or employ useful collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of institutional support?
  • Research Project Funding Success Rates
  • B/START & I/START Success Rate B/START 1995-2005 I/START 2003-2005 Fiscal Year % Funded
  • Funding Success Rate (FY 05)
  • Dollars Obligated New and Competing Awards (NIDA-FY05) Total
  • Percentage of New Funded R01 Applications Received from “New” Principal Investigators to NIDA
  • Application & Funding Process
    • Grant success rates
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what?
    • Funding
    • Conclusions
  • Before You Apply: Developing the Research Concept (one approach)
    • Find out about the institutional support that is available to you
    • Ask three senior colleagues to act as your “grant committee.” Discussing your ideas for the application with them before starting the writing process
    • Write three to five specific aims and discuss these with the committee before writing the application---by the time you tackle the bulk of the writing, the organization and content of your proposal have received fairly detailed scrutiny and critical consideration
  • First steps in writing your application: Start Work
    • Generate preliminary data if needed–Most important for R01
    • Enlist collaborators
      • include letters from them
      • clearly spell out the collaborations in your proposal
    • Look at successful proposals of colleagues in your field
    • Have a good idea!
    • Develop the concept
    • Contact NIH by Web and by phone to reach people
    • who can help you
  • First steps in writing your application: Start Writing
    • Prepare your proposal early--Do not rush!
    •   Make your first proposal your best proposal-- Convey confidence and enthusiasm
    •   Do your homework-- know the literature and issues, questions, and controversies in your area
      •   Place your work in perspective
      • Cite others—especially members of the review committee--if appropriate
      • If there are two camps, make sure you cite both sides
    • Know the relevant review criteria
    • Make your priorities clear
    • Provide a timeline
    • Be focused and use a clear and concise writing style
  • First steps in writing your application: Start Writing
    • Discuss potential problems and pitfalls-- Describe alternate strategies
    • Carefully consider your funding needs—
      • Keep in mind that the reviewers will judge your competence, in part, by how well your funding request matches the scope of the project
    • Proofread!-- Reviewers and NIH Staff have zero tolerance for typographical errors, misspellings, or sloppy formatting.
    • Critique your own proposal
    • Have others read your final draft
  • Submitting Your Application: “ Dear CSR, …….”
    • Include a “cover letter” with application
      • Request funding agency
        • Primary assignment
        • Dual assignment if appropriate
      • Request review committee assignment
      • NIDA Review groups:
        • http://www.nida.nih.gov/IRGCouncil/IRGStructure.html
      • CSR Review Group
        • http://www.csr.nih.gov/Committees/rosterindex.asp#A
    After all this…. Concerned about your review committee or funding agency? Be proactive!—Contact NIH — Ask questions
  • Application & Funding Process
    • Grant success rates
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what? Will I get funds?
    • Conclusions
  • After Your Application is Reviewed ……….. Talk with Program Staff about:
    • Your Priority Score
    • Summary Statement
    • Funding (?)
    • Next Steps:
      • Revision
      • Other ideas & options
  • Making Funding Decisions: Who Gets Paid and Why
    • Scientific Merit
      • Priority score
      • Percentile score
      • Summary statement-- reviewers comments
    • Programmatic Relevance
      • Gap area?
      • Submitted under an RFA?
    • New Investigator
    • Availability of Funds
    • Advisory Council Recommendations
    • Congressional Mandates (e.g., HIV/AIDS)
  • Application & Funding Process
    • Grant success rates
    • The application process
    • Contacting the right person
    • “ K” and “R” Awards
    • Writing and submitting your application
    • After the application is reviewed: Now what? Will I get funds?
    • Conclusions
  • Before You Apply ……….. Talk With NIDA Staff……….. and learn about…
    • Funding Mechanisms
    • Program Priorities
    • Grant Process
    • Application Procedure
    • Review Process and Review Committees
    • New Initiatives-
        • RFAs, PAs
    • Research Interests
    • NIH Roadmap & NIH Neuroscience Blueprint
  • Career Development Plan R01 Yes Do I have pilot data? No No Apply for R03, BSTART or ISTART Do I need more training or changing career emphasis? Institutional Pre-Doctoral Fellowship-T32 Pre-Doctoral Fellowship-F31 Post-Doctoral Fellowship-F32 Institutional Post-Doctoral Fellowship-T32 Yes Apply for Mentored K
  • After Your Application is Reviewed ……….. Talk with Program Staff……….. about….….
    • Your Priority Score
    • Summary Statement
    • Funding(?)
    • Next Steps:
      • Revision
      • Other ideas & options
  • BE PROACTIVE !!! BE P ERSISTENT !!! ENGAGE A P ROGRAM OFFICER !!!
  •