PY417: Advanced Neuroscience Seminar:
Developmental Neuroscience
Block 6, 2006
Tutt Science 108
Instructor: Sharon Sann
Em...
With the following breakdown:
A = 90 – 100% Excellent work that reflects superior understanding and insight,creativity, or...
Be prepared for the professor to informally “quiz” you on your understanding of the material.
If your lecture day includes...
Online:
PubMed: http://ncbi.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed
PubMed has many books online including Gilbert (2003) list...
If you have any questions with regards to this matter, you may also find valuable information on
the following websites:
h...
COURSE SCHEDULE
Week 1
Monday
Introduction to developmental neuroscience; Introduction to embryology and review of
cell bi...
Wednesday
Neural migration; The guidance of axons to their targets; Dendritic development
Lecture: KSJ Chapter 54 p. 1063-...
Wednesday
Cellular mechanisms of learning and the biological basis of individuality
Lecture: KSJ Chapter 63 p. 1246-1279
D...
Final Paper—Peer Review
Author ID _________________________________________________________
Reviewer ID __________________...
Student(s) ____________________________ Overall grade _________
Readings presented _______________________________________...
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  1. 1. PY417: Advanced Neuroscience Seminar: Developmental Neuroscience Block 6, 2006 Tutt Science 108 Instructor: Sharon Sann Email: sbsann@yahoo.com Phone: 389-6176 Office: Tutt Science 306B This course will explore the development of the nervous system with a focus on embryonic development. We will study what is known in answer to questions such as: How does a cell "decide" to be a neuron? What leads to the decisions to make a certain transmitter or to have a particular morphology or physiological property? How do the processes of a neuron know where to go and which other cells to contact? How does experience and aging affect the wiring and rewiring of the brain? We will also learn how knowledge of the developing embryonic nervous system may be applied to using stem cells for therapy, and we will learn about the challenges of axon regeneration in the CNS. We will briefly cover developmental disorders such as autism. This course is organized as an advanced-level seminar meaning that everyone (students and the professor) shares equally in ensuring excellent coverage of the material and productive discussions. Each student will be responsible for presenting a lecture and leading a discussion. All students are expected to contribute to active and balanced discussions every class day. To this end, you are required to thoroughly read the assigned chapters and articles before coming to class each day and to think about the material in depth. Preferably, you will read the material twice and take notes both to solidify comprehension of the material and to provide starting points for class discussions. Required texts: Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., & Jessell, T.M. (2000). Principles of Neural Science (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. Journal articles and a chapter from the following available on the course website: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/PY/Faculty/Sann.html Squire, L.R., Bloom, F. E., McConnell, S.K., Roberts, J.L., Spitzer, N.C., & Zigmond, M.J. (2003). Fundamental Neuroscience (2nd ed.). San Diego: Academic Press. Course requirements and grading: The final grade for the course will be calculated from the following: Review exam: 10% Class discussion/interaction: 15% Lecture 25% Paper 25% Final exam 25%
  2. 2. With the following breakdown: A = 90 – 100% Excellent work that reflects superior understanding and insight,creativity, or skill. B = 80 – 89% Good work that reflects a high level of understanding and insight, creativity, or skill. C = 70 – 79% Adequate work that indicates readiness to continue study in the field. D = 65 – 69% Marginal work, only minimally adequate, indicating lack of readiness to continue in the field. NC = below 65% Failing work, clearly inadequate and unworthy of credit. An unexcused absence will result in deduction of half a letter grade from your final grade. Consistent with department policy, three unexcused absences will result in failure of the class. 1. The review exam will cover material from Neuroscience PY299 (PY312). 2. The class discussion/interaction grade will be assigned by the professor to the class as a whole. In other words, everyone in the class will be assigned the same grade. Each student shares the responsibility for maintaining an active and balanced discussion. A successful discussion: a) illustrates that everyone in the class comprehends the article; b) includes insight, critique, and analysis that goes beyond comprehension of the article; c) integrates information from the article with other class material (from lecture that day and previous days); d) is balanced and respectful of opinions with everyone participating and no one dominating the discussion. For each discussion, every student should prepare at least two questions or comments on the discussion article. 3. Each student will be responsible (individually or in pairs, depending on class size) for presenting a lecture and leading a discussion. The lecture will cover the assigned “lecture” readings of the day as well as any background necessary to introduce the “discussion” article. The lecture should last about 1.5 hours (absolutely no longer than 2 hours), including a 10 minute break, and should be an instructive synthesis of the main points in the chapter and review article. A successful lecture is clear, coherent, organized, logical, and interesting. The lecture may not be read. The lecture should be relatively interactive, allowing time for student questions during and after the lecture. Because this is an instructive lecture rather than a formal presentation, power point should only be used minimally (i.e., only for figures/movies that cannot be accurately or efficiently portrayed through drawing on the board). If in doubt, ask the professor during the planning meeting. Power point may be used to project the figures of the discussion article during the discussion so that students have a common reference to point to. In leading the discussion, keep in mind the above points of a successful discussion. You should prepare: a) at least as many comprehension questions as there are students in the class; many of these could take the form of “please explain figure 1a” b) questions of analysis and critique; ex: “the authors conclude x; do you think their data adequately support this conclusion?” c) questions leading to integration of the article with other class material At least two days prior to your assigned lecture day, you must meet with the professor. Before this meeting, you should thoroughly read the chapter and article(s) for your day and begin to prepare your lecture. You should bring the following to the meeting: a) a list of the questions or difficulties that you had in understanding the reading b) an outline of the topics that you will cover in the lecture and how you will cover them c) your potential discussion questions
  3. 3. Be prepared for the professor to informally “quiz” you on your understanding of the material. If your lecture day includes a choice of articles, please inform the professor and the class of your choice by the Wednesday morning preceding your lecture. 4. You will write a critical review paper on a topic in developmental neuroscience that does not overlap with your lecture topics. Paper topics must be approved by the professor and cannot be changed once approved. Papers should include at least 15 citations from peer reviewed journals or academic books (no internet citations). Clear, concise writing is important in scientific communication. Papers are limited to 5 pages. Papers must be written in current APA format. If there are articles that you need but cannot access in Colorado Springs, you may arrange with me to use my access to UC San Diego’s online subscriptions. This is a one time use of no more than one hour to be arranged at my convenience; do not wait until the last minute. To check if UCSD will have online access prior to using my computer, go to libraries.ucsd.edu, and under ROGER change the pull down menu from “Keyword” to “Title / Journal title.” Two copies of a complete draft of your paper are due Thursday of week three. Incomplete papers will be deducted half a letter grade. Each paper will be peer reviewed by two other students. Suggestions from the peer review should be incorporated into your final paper, due the following Tuesday. Turn in the peer reviewed copies of your paper along with your final paper. The writing center is available to assist at all stages of writing your paper. http://www.coloradocollege.edu/learningcommons/writingcenter/ 5. The final exam will test on all material covered in the course. There will be a closed book and an open book portion of the exam. Additional resources: The following resources will be useful for background information and in answering questions you have on the class material. On reserve at Tutt Library: Gilbert, S. F. (2003). Developmental Biology (7nd ed.). Sunderland: Sinaur Associates. Squire, L.R., Bloom, F. E., McConnell, S.K., Roberts, J.L., Spitzer, N.C., & Zigmond, M.J. (2003). Fundamental Neuroscience (2nd ed.). San Diego: Academic Press. Wolpert, L, Beddington, R., Jessell, T., Lawrence, P., Meyerowitz, E., & Smith, J. (2002). Principles of Development (2nd ed.) Oxford: University Press. Sanes, D. H., Reh, T., & Harris, W. A. (2006). Development of the Nervous System (2nd ed.) Burlington: Elsevier. The professor has the CDs from Sanes et al. (2006) and Squire et al. (2003).
  4. 4. Online: PubMed: http://ncbi.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed PubMed has many books online including Gilbert (2003) listed above and multiple books on cell biology. At the PubMed website, pull down the “Search” menu to books, type in your topic, and hit go. Biosis: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Library/Reference/alpha.html#gotoB National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke disorders index: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/disorder_index.htm Medline medical dictionary: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mplusdictionary.html Honor code According to the Colorado College Honor System, students must adhere to the following general guideline regarding plagiarism: In papers, direct quotations must be acknowledged by quotes and footnotes. Ideas or paraphrasing taken from outside sources (including course textbooks) must be properly acknowledged, unless the professor specifically states otherwise (Pathfinder, 1996-97, p. 57). More specific rules about plagiarism are found in the American Psychology Association (APA) Publication Manual (1994, pp. 292, 294): Quotation marks should be used to indicate the exact words of another. Summarizing a passage or rearranging the order of a sentence and changing some of the words is paraphrasing. Each time a source is paraphrased, a credit for the source needs to be included in the text . . . .The key element of this principle is that an author does not present the work of another as if it were his or her own work. This can extend to ideas as well as written words. Plagiarism is avoided by proper use of quotations and paraphrasing. A quotation is an exact copy of the language from your source; for this you use quotation marks, cite the reference and the page number(s)--as detailed in the APA Publication Manual (see pp. 168-174). In general, one will quote in scientific writing only when the original text contains memorable words or phrases. These quotes generally have emotional overtones, and often express the original author's bias. Because science is primarily concerned with information (more so than how the ideas are expressed), quotations are very rare in scientific writing. Overuse of quotations detracts from a paper in both style and content, and generally reflects a lack of effort on the part of the writer. Paraphrasing is a presentation of information from another source in your own words (and therefore in your own style and syntax). You only need to give the source of the original text (no page number) for the in-text citation. Paraphrasing is very common in scientific writing because you often base your arguments on information synthesized from other sources. You should paraphrase when you want to simplify or summarize ideas presented in the original text.
  5. 5. If you have any questions with regards to this matter, you may also find valuable information on the following websites: http://www.ColoradoCollege.edu/Dept/PY/Plag.html http://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/honorcode.asp http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Library/Course/webplag2b.html http://sja.ucdavis.edu/avoid.htm In accordance with the honor system, you must write and sign the following on your paper and on your exams: "I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this paper/exam." Do not put your name anywhere on your paper or exams; use only your student ID#. Sign the honor code only with your student ID# as well.
  6. 6. COURSE SCHEDULE Week 1 Monday Introduction to developmental neuroscience; Introduction to embryology and review of cell biology; Model systems used in research Tuesday Review of Neuroscience (no lecture; come with questions) Wednesday Review Exam Thursday Introdution to methods in articles for the upcoming week Go over review exam Paper topics due by 3 pm (exception: tomorrow’s lecturer(s) may tell me their topic by Monday) Friday Induction and patterning of the nervous system; Techniques in embryology Lecture: KSJ Chapter 52 p. 1017-1040 Schoenwolf, G.C. (2001). Cutting, pasting, and painting: Experimental embryology and neural development. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 763-71. Discussion: Fukuchi-Shimogori, T., & Grove, E. A. (2001). Neocortex patterning by the secreted signaling molecule FGF8. Science, 294, 1071-1074. Perspective: Rakic, P. (2001). Neurocreationism – making new cortical maps. Science, 294, 1011-1012. Week 2 Monday The generation and survival of nerve cells; Neural stem cells Lecture: KSJ Chapter 53 p. 1041-1062 Temple, S. (2001). Stem cell plasticity – building the brain of our dreams. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 513-520. Discussion: Goldman, S. (2005). Stem and progenitor cell based therapy of the human central nervous system. Nature Biotechnology, 23, 862-871.
  7. 7. Wednesday Neural migration; The guidance of axons to their targets; Dendritic development Lecture: KSJ Chapter 54 p. 1063-1085 Nadarajah, B., & Parnavedas, J. G. (2002). Modes of neuronal migration in the developing crebral cortex. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 423-432. Discussion: Portera-Cailliau, C. P., Pan, D. T., & Yuste, R. (2003). Activity – regulated dynamic behavior of early dendritic protrusions: Evidence for different types of dendritc filopodia. The Journal of Neuroscience, 23, 7129-7124. Thursday Introduction to methods in articles for the upcoming week Friday The formation and regeneration of synapses Lecture: KSJ Chapter 55 p. 1087-1114 Lichtman, J. W., & Sanes, J. R. (2003). Watching the Neuromuscular Junction. Journal of Neurocytology, 32, 767-775. Discussion: Walsh, M. K., & Lichtman, J. W. (2003). In vivo time lapse imaging of synaptic takeover associated with naturally occurring synapse elimination. Neuron, 37, 67-73. Week 3 Monday Sensory experience and the fine tuning of synaptic connections Lecture: KSJ Chapter 56 p. 1115-1130 Innocenti, G.M., & Price, D. J. (2005). Exuberance in the development of cortical networks. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6, 955-965. OR Wong, R. O., & Ghosh, A. (2002). Activity dependent regulation of dendritic growth and patterning. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 803-812. Discussion: Zhang, L.I., Bao, S., & Merzenich, M.M. (2002). Disruption of primary auditory cortex by synchronous auditory inputs during a critical period. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99, 2309-2314.
  8. 8. Wednesday Cellular mechanisms of learning and the biological basis of individuality Lecture: KSJ Chapter 63 p. 1246-1279 Discussion: Zhang, L. I., Tao, H. W., Holt, C., E., Harris, W. A., & Poo, M. (1998). A critical window for cooperation and competition among developing retinotectal synapses. Nature, 395, 37-44. Thursday Peer review of student papers Introduction to methods in articles for the final two lectures Friday Cognitive development; Childhood developmental disorders Lecture: Squire et al. p.1167-1177; 1186-1195; p.1199 (box 46.4) Assign one for lecture and one for discussion: Johnson, M.H., (2001). Functional brain development in humans. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 475-483. Catellanos, F. X., & Tannock, R. (2002). Neuroscience of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: The search for endophenotypes. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 617-628. Courchesne E., Redclay, E., Morgan, J.T., & Kennedey, D.P. (2005). Autism at the beginning: Microstructural and growth abnormalities underlying the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of autism. Developmental Psychopathology, 17, 577-597. Week 4 Monday Adult neurogenesis; Aging; Alzheimer’s disease Lecture: KSJ Chapter 58 p. 1149-1161 Squire et al. p. 1177-1186; 1195-1199 Ming, G., & Song, H. (2005). Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian central nervous system. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 28, 223-250. Discussion: Schmidt-Hieber, C., Jonas, P., & Bischofberger, J. (2004). Enhanced synaptic plasticity in newly generated granule cells of the adult hippocampus. Nature, 429, 184-187. Tuesday Final papers due by 9:00 am. Review for final exam. Wednesday Final exam
  9. 9. Final Paper—Peer Review Author ID _________________________________________________________ Reviewer ID ________________________________________________________ Reviewer: Please give the author constructive feedback on the following categories. The more detail you can provide, the better. It is acceptable to refer the author to comments written directly on the text (“see comments in text”) rather than recapitulating them here. 1. Content. Does the paper address the topic in sufficient depth? Is the content complete, or do you think something is missing? 2. Organization. Is the paper clearly organized so that main ideas flow smoothly and are logically connected? Within each paragraph, is the topic cohesive and supported by relevant data? 3. Style. Did the author correctly follow APA style conventions and use formal academic language? Are word choices appropriate? Is the style concise or too wordy? 4. Language. Are there frequent grammatical or syntactical errors? Are the sentences easy to comprehend? 5. Mechanics. Is the paper typed according to APA format (including margins, in-text citations, references, abstract)? Are any sections missing? 6. Additional suggestions or comments:
  10. 10. Student(s) ____________________________ Overall grade _________ Readings presented ____________________________________________________ I. Lecture Instructive presentation of information in readings A B C D NC Lecture was interactive (i.e., involved students) A B C D NC Integration with other class material A B C D NC Organization A B C D NC Clarity A B C D NC Presentation form, style, pacing, etc. A B C D NC Other points: II. Contribution to leading discussion Guided students through comprehending/ A B C D NC demonstrating comprehension of article Guided students through analysis/critique of A B C D NC article Guided students through integrating the article A B C D NC with other course material Facilitated balanced discussion A B C D NC Other points: III. Preparation for meeting with the professor Has read and generally comprehends the A B C D NC material prior to meeting Preparation of questions, outline, and A B C D NC discussion

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