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Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
Letter of Intent.doc
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  • 1. LETTER OF INTENT TO ESTABLISH M.S. AND Ph.D. DEGREES IN NEUROSCIENCE I. Letter of Intent Institution__Georgia State University______Date_____March 17, 2008________ School/Division__College of Arts & Sciences___Department__Biology, Psychology, Math & Statistics, Physics & Astronomy, Philosophy, Computer Science___ Name of Proposed Program_____ Ph.D. in Neuroscience____________________ Degree ___M.S., Ph.D._____Major ___Neuroscience_____ CIP Code____________ Starting Date _August 2009___ Signatures: Unit Heads _______________________ _ Neuroscience Institute _____________________ Psychology _____________________ Biology _______________________ _ Physics & Astronomy _______________________ _ Math & Statistics _______________________ _ Philosophy _______________________ _ Chemistry _______________________ _ Computer Information Systems _______________________ _ Computer Science Program Directors _______________________ _ Brains & Behavior Area of Focus _______________________ _ Center for Behavioral Neuroscience _______________________ _ Center for Neuromics _______________________ _ Center for Research on Atypical Development and Learning _______________________ _ Language Research Center _______________________ _ 1
  • 2. College Deans _______________________ _ Arts & Sciences _______________________ _ _______________________ _ 1. Introduction 1.A. Overview This letter of intent describes a plan for establishing a multidisciplinary, multi- departmental, degree-offering Neuroscience Program that will enhance the behavioral and life sciences training and research efforts of Georgia State University (GSU). The program will respond to requests from students and a need for highly trained specialists in the areas of Neurobiology and Behavioral Neuroscience. The Neuroscience Program will provide students with the training necessary for careers in the rapidly expanding biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries as well as for academic careers. Recent studies and our own survey (appended) clearly indicate that prospective students in the neurosciences prefer to earn advanced degrees specifically in Neuroscience rather than in traditional biological or behavioral science programs. The Neuroscience Program will therefore enhance the ability of GSU to compete for top graduate students nationally and internationally. The proposed program will be administered through the newly created Neuroscience Institute at GSU. It is a natural extension of the present Neuroscience-related concentrations within the Ph.D. programs in the Biology and Psychology departments. Research in the Biology Department’s Neurobiology and Behavior concentration includes neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neuroendocrinology, developmental neuroscience, neuromodulation, neuroethology, neural control of peripheral metabolism, and pain research. Research in the Psychology Department’s Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience concentration includes neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neuroendocrinology, developmental neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, neuroethology, clinical neuropsychology, the study of mood (affective) disorders, learning and memory, social behavior, language, and hearing. In addition there are faculty and students in other departments that are working in Neuroscience-related areas, including theory of mind studies in Philosophy, robotics and neural modeling in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Math & Statistics, and Physics & Astronomy, Neuromics in Computer Science, and drug development and imaging strategies in Chemistry. Several centers and programs with a focus on various and diverse aspects of the neurosciences already exist at GSU. These programs will be the foundation for the 2
  • 3. development of our proposed doctoral program in the Neurosciences. The following section describes these programs: • The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience (CBN) founded in 2000 is an NSF- funded Science and Technology Center, and is a consortium of more than 100 researchers at seven Atlanta institutions examining the neural mechanisms underlying complex social behaviors. GSU is the lead institution and administrative unit of the CBN. The social behaviors that are essential for species survival, such as fear, affiliation, aggression, and reproductive behaviors, are an important frontier in Neuroscience. The research efforts are complemented by an educational program designed to integrate scientific progress into the curricula of students at all levels. In addition, there is knowledge transfer conducted to promote science literacy. Therefore, the CBN works with its community partners -- Zoo Atlanta, the Fernbank Museum of Natural History, and the Georgia Aquarium-- to develop Neuroscience-related educational exhibits and activities, as well as with the Georgia Biomedical Partnership. CBN’s mission of integrating neuroscience research and education, and of stimulating interdisciplinary research would also be enhanced by a neuroscience doctoral program at GSU, and would in turn provide a valuable asset to it. The CBN has developed into having a leading role in linking GSU to the undergraduate and graduate programs of several strong colleges and universities in Atlanta, including institutions with a high proportion of underrepresented minorities. These links include obtaining resources for graduate training in neurosciences via federally funded training grants and foundation grants in targeted areas. Presently, such grants are strongly helped by being multi-institutional and by offering training that cuts across traditional academic departments. A neuroscience doctoral program at GSU would help in obtaining such external funding, both by allowing students access to training across GSU departments and by facilitating the integration of a GSU graduate training program with those at other Atlanta institutions. At the same time, the CBN will provide links between neuroscience students trained at GSU and complementary programs, facilities, and mentoring opportunities at institutions such as Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Morehouse School of Medicine. Furthermore, a neuroscience doctoral program at GSU would aid the CBN’s efforts to increase minority recruitment into neuroscience graduate programs and more generally to elevate the national profile of GSU as a major center for neuroscience research and education. • The Center for Neuromics, founded in 2006, emerged from the former Center for Neural Communication and Computation. This Center fosters research that takes advantage of recent advances in molecular, physiological, and computational techniques to support research in the study of neurons and their interactions. An ultimate goal is to build increasingly precise cellular wiring diagrams of the brain. The Center is dedicated to supporting efforts in this field through sponsorship of seminars and conferences and providing funding for students. 3
  • 4. • The Center for Research on Atypical Development and Learning (CRADL) is an interdisciplinary center founded in 1998 that stimulates basic and applied research and facilitates educational and outreach efforts. CRADL consists of 23 faculty members who represent a broad span of academic orientations including developmental, clinical and educational psychology, neuropsychology, special education, and speech-language pathology. CRADL and its faculty coordinate and support scholarly efforts that focus on gaining a fuller understanding of atypical development and learning processes from birth through adolescence. • The Language Research Center (LRC), founded in 1971, is a world renowned primate research facility. At the LRC, scientists from GSU and around the world conduct cognitive, biobehavioral, social and cultural research with bonobos (Pan paniscus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and human adults and children. Located on a wooded 55-acre facility south of Atlanta, the LRC is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and other agencies. The varied research programs in learning, memory, attention, executive functioning, problem solving, spatial cognition, numerical reasoning, categorization, tool making and use, and communication find convergence under the LRC banner. • The Clinical Neuropsychology Laboratories, founded in 1983, share the goal of investigating cognitive and emotional functions in humans using several methodologies, including functional neuroimaging, psychophysiology, experimental cognitive tasks, and traditional clinical neuropsychological assessment measures. The faculty has interests in learning more about the biological, psychological, and social-environmental processes underlying developmental disorders and acquired neurological conditions across the lifespan. Their goals are to advance the understanding of brain-behavior relationships, and to further the development of empirically validated classification criteria, reliable and valid assessment measures and effective intervention strategies for these clinical populations. • The Brains & Behavior Area of Focus, founded in 2004, is an initiative at GSU that unites a wide variety of researchers who bring unique perspectives to the study of how nervous systems produce behavior. This initiative builds upon GSU's successes in the Neurosciences. These groups foster collaborations between faculty from the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Philosophy, Physics and Astronomy, and Psychology. Brains & Behavior also forms an umbrella organization for Research Centers such as the CBN, the Center for Brain Science and Health, the Center for Neuromics, the Language Research Center, and the Southeast Collaborative Alliance Biocomputing Center. New students are currently and will continue to be recruited nationally and internationally. 4
  • 5. It is expected, based on data from the Association of Neuroscience Departments and Programs (ANDP), that titling a degree as “Neuroscience” will be highly attractive and will markedly increase the number of qualified applicants to the doctoral programs. Women and minorities will continue to be recruited aggressively. Currently the Department of Biology offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biology with a concentration in Neurobiology and Behavior (NBB). The NBB program currently has approximately 19 M.S. and 32 Ph.D. students mentored by neurobiology faculty. The average number of M.S. and Ph.D. students in NBB to graduate each year is 10 and 4, respectively. The Department of Psychology offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees with a concentration in Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience (NBN). The NBN program currently has 16 M.A. candidates and 11 Ph.D. candidates that have already earned their M.A. The average number of M.A. and Ph.D. students in NBN to graduate each year is 3 and 2 respectively. It is expected that these numbers would increase by 50-100% if marketing could be targeted to a Neuroscience degree. A Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience will benefit the University, the System, and the state in many ways, including those described in the following section: • NEUROSCIENCE IS INTERDISCIPLINARY, A KEY IN TODAY’S SCIENCE The interdisciplinary nature of Neuroscience research is fundamental and thereby unites faculty across various disciplines as perhaps no other life science initiative can, as witnessed by the Brains & Behavior Area of Focus incorporation of 9 different departments from 3 different colleges. Neuroscience encompasses several fields of biological and behavioral research and is typically subdivided into the following disciplines: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Systems and Integrative Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience, Computational Neuroscience, and Clinical Neuroscience. Allied areas include biophysics of membranes, biochemistry of neurotransmitters and signal transduction pathways, robotics, brain/computer interfaces, learning/educational research, psychotropic drug design, social behavior, marketing strategy, philosophy of mind, and others. • NEUROSCIENCE IS BIG BUSINESS Neuroscience has attracted the lion’s share of federal funding in recent decades, particularly in the “Decade of the Brain” established by Congress from 1990 to 2000. Approximately $5 billion are currently awarded by NIH to Neuroscience-related projects in the USA. Another $800 million comes from NSF, with smaller amounts from Howard Hughes, the McKnight Foundation, March of Dimes, Whitehall Foundation, Klingenstein, drug companies, and neurological disease-specific funding agencies. Additional awards come from other government sectors such as the Departments of Defense and Education. The average annual level of Neuroscience funding at GSU over the last five years has been $5,685,160. The CBN seed funds for research and student training have leveraged over $8 million since inception. A neuroscience degree would act as a recruitment tool so that more highly trained scientists can be hired, and as a marketing strategy to get attention by funding agencies. 5
  • 6. • NEUROSCIENCE IS THE LAST MAJOR FRONTIER IN MEDICINE The major medical problems facing the population in the foreseeable future are brain problems. The killer diseases of previous generations, such as polio, heart disease, cancer, and even diabetes, are increasingly preventable or treatable, but diseases or injuries of the brain currently have few solutions. Topics related to these diseases include: Drug abuse Social pathology (e.g. various anti-social personality disorders) Spinal cord regeneration Traumatic brain injury Epilepsy Childhood developmental disorders Chronic pain Obesity-induced diabetes, hypertension, joint pain, and congestive heart failure Mental health/affective disorders (e.g. autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression) Neurological ramifications of disease states Robotics, sensory and motor prostheses Terrorism- neurotoxins, neuroimmunology Baby boomer diseases Arthritis Aging Deafness Age-and diabetes related blindness, e.g. macular degeneration, glaucoma Parkinson’s Disease Alzheimer’s Disease Diffuse Lewy Body Syndrome Other Dementias • NEUROSCIENCE IS IMPROVING EDUCATION AND MINORITY PARTICIPATION Neuroscience faculty are actively involved in efforts to improve science education at the K-12 level via initiatives coordinated by the CBN. GSU neuroscience educators have established partnerships with the Decatur School System and the DeKalb County School system for a series of programs involving teachers and students, including teacher training workshops, school visits, and a lending library of science education materials made available to classroom teachers. Integrated into these teacher and classroom-oriented activities are summer programs for students, including the ION (Institute on Neuroscience) program for high school students in which the students gain formal mentoring and an opportunity to work in neuroscience labs at GSU and other Atlanta universities and colleges, and Summer Brain Camps, summer science camps for middle school students which both provide science experiences for the students during which GSU science faculty and public school teachers who have completed one of the teacher training workshops work together. GSU neuroscience educators also hold a two day Neuroscience Expo at the Atlanta 6
  • 7. Zoo, the first day of which students from a Decatur middle school are exposed to neuroscience-related activities, while on the second day the Expo is open to all children and their parents who visit the Zoo. School-oriented programs are focused on schools with high proportions of underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged students. Summer programs and other student-oriented activities have >80% minority student participation. The Georgia Biomedical Partnership recognized the CBN for its outstanding work in education and community outreach with its 2006 Biomedical Community Award. Neuroscience faculty members lead the CBN’s undergraduate education initiatives as well. The nationally recognized BRAIN program for undergraduates is held each year, bringing in 22 undergraduates from Atlanta institutions and across the nation for neuroscience research fellowships to gain hands- on research experience at GSU and other Atlanta universities and colleges while attending lectures and seminars on neuroscience topics and professional skills. Historically, >75% of the participants have been women and >60% underrepresented minorities. A similar academic year program, CBNuf, is currently being tested, targeted specifically at minority undergraduates at Spelman College, Morehouse College, and Clark Atlanta University. Neuroscience faculty have established strong relationships with these Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Atlanta. Career Days and Research Days at Spelman College, Morehouse College, and Clark Atlanta University are attended by neuroscience faculty and CBN staff to provide information about graduate school opportunities, and several students from these institutions have worked in GSU neuroscience labs and/or enrolled in its graduate programs. In recognition of his work with these institutions, CBN Director and GSU neuroscience faculty member Dr. Elliott Albers was named Mentor of the Year by The Center for Biomedical and Behavioral Research at Spelman College in 2006. Improvements in education extend to the professional level as well. There is enhancement of graduate and research programs through the CBN Graduate Scholars Program (providing doctoral students with an interest in behavioral Neuroscience the opportunity to gain a broader breadth of experience by working in a collaborative research environment) and a CBN Post-Doctoral Fellows program. • NEUROSCIENCE PROMOTES RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT GSU has important resources for supporting students in the emerging field of neuromics. We have the first Center for Neuromics (http://biology.gsu.edu/ neuromics) in the nation, which promotes research aimed at understanding the complex interactions of neurons in the brain. Through seed funding from the Brains & Behavior program, we have initiated a collaborative project between biologists and computer scientists to build NeuronBank, a knowledgebase of neuronal circuitry, which has now received NIH funding. The Center for Neuromics sponsors seminars and provides student travel and research awards. Some of our faculty are involved with the Allen Brain Project: (http://www.alleninstitute.org/content/projects.htm, http://www.brainatlas.org/aba/). This is a program for developing cutting-edge bioinformatics type tools to catalog brain areas, nerve cells and their interconnections, and the genes involved in setting 7
  • 8. up and maintaining brain function. This information will be of great use in basic research to understand the workings of the brain, in drug development for neurological diseases, in neurosurgical innovations and gene therapy. These endeavors are expected to produce translational research that would lead to patentable innovations. • NEUROSCIENCE IS PROFITABLE FOR GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY Across the last five years, the average annual federal funding for Neuroscience at GSU has been $5,685,160, a sizable percentage of all NIH/NSF funding at our institution. With the help of more and even higher quality graduate students, as well as the inevitable increase in faculty that occurs with growing highly successful programs, we can do better, largely because Neuroscience research is a unifying theme across many of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Centers. The NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research was launched in 2004 with 15 participating Institutes and Centers to provide a framework for coordinating research, and developing tools and resources which are broadly useful for advancing Neuroscience research (http://Neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/). To this end, the NIH is generating a series of focused initiatives designed to catalyze Neuroscience research. In fiscal years 2005 and 2006, the Blueprint supported the creation and distribution of resources that are of broad utility to the entire Neuroscience community. In fiscal years 2007-2009, the NIH Blueprint plans to address three specific, cross-cutting themes: neurodegeneration, neurodevelopment, and neuronal plasticity, respectively. Note that the Neuroscience-related faculty members at GSU are particularly strong in these areas, and future hires will hopefully expand this expertise. • A Ph.D. PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE AT GSU WILL BE ENHANCED BY NEW FACILITIES IN OUR NEW SCIENCE PARK. GSU is currently planning a new Science Park that will house the neurosciences and other life sciences. This will bring together faculty from across the campus into contiguous space for teaching, research, and administration. Uniting the students doing Neuroscience research under one degree program will promote collaborative work and should enhance acquisition of new grants. The new science buildings should help unify the Neuroscience researchers under one roof and provide space for new faculty recruitment in the Neurosciences. • A Ph.D. PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE AT GSU WILL ENHANCE VISIBILITY OF OUR EXISTING PROGRAMS IN NEUROSCIENCE Students interested in Neuroscience want to have a Ph.D. in Neuroscience to reflect their specialized knowledge and training. The annual number of applications for graduate training in the neural sciences has almost tripled during the past 19 years and is now ~65 per program, while the number of matriculates has doubled and is now ~8 students per program. Nonetheless, the academic quality of incoming graduate students has remained high, as suggested by their undergraduate GPA (average = 3.49), their scores on the GRE (average = ~69th percentile), and their research experience. 23% of the incoming students have an undergraduate major in 8
  • 9. Neuroscience or Behavioral Neuroscience. Other common majors were Biology (23%), Psychology (15%), and Chemistry (6%), and an additional 8% had dual majors including one or more of these disciplines. A Ph.D. program in Neuroscience at GSU will facilitate our national and international reputation, paying dividends in more and better students as well as better postdoctoral and faculty positions for our Ph.D. graduates. This, in turn, will heighten awareness of Neuroscience at GSU, specifically, and GSU research more generally in the national/international arena. This will lead to even higher quality job applicants for faculty positions in Neuroscience-related Departments. • A Ph.D. PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE AT GSU WILL FACILITATE ADMINISTRATION OF OUR NEUROSCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS Faculty who could jointly train Ph.D. students are currently in different departments and degree programs and under the current arrangement cannot serve on the same Ph.D. committees except as outside members. This was part of the impetus for creating the interdisciplinary Neuroscience Institute. The ANDP 2005 reports that more than half of all Neuroscience programs are institution-wide, reflecting the broad-based, interdisciplinary nature of the field. Only 18% are located in Departments of Neuroscience or Neurobiology. In contrast, 64% of the programs link neuroscientists in multiple departments (or in a “Center”, “Division”, or “Institute” of Neuroscience) in a unified, degree-granting program. These numbers are similar to those obtained in the 2000/2001 and 2003 ANDP surveys. On average, there are 51 faculty members per program. In 75% of the programs, the degree awarded to graduate students trained in the neurosciences is a Ph.D. in Neuroscience or in Neurobiology (or in a discipline that had those words in their name). This situation represents a striking reversal from that which occurred 19 years ago, when the majority of such degrees were awarded in other disciplines. The number of applications to graduate training programs in the neurosciences is almost three times the number per program that it was in the 1986 survey. The median number of graduate students in a program is 25. The Ph.D. degrees awarded per year average 3.9 per program and this number has been steadily increasing. The attrition rate is only 4%. 69% accepted postdoctoral positions, 26% were in other neuroscience- related positions, 1% were employed outside the field, and 0% were unemployed. Thus, a unified Ph.D. program should produce a seamless program of study for Neuroscience graduate students across departments. 1.B. The Faculty The Departments of Biology and Psychology have a faculty that is skilled and highly accomplished in their academic disciplines. Many are leaders in their fields and all have active and externally funded research programs. In addition other departments have faculty doing neuroscience-related research. A description of the faculty involved in neuroscience research in each of the Brains and Behavior-associated departments follows below. Most of these faculty plan a core, associate, or affiliate membership in the Neuroscience Institute. 9
  • 10. Biology Name Position Interests Elliott Albers biohea@langate.gsu.edu Regents' Professor Influence of peptides and amines on aggressive behavior and circadian rhythms in hamsters Deborah Baro dbaro@gsu.edu Associate Professor Molecular biology of membrane receptors and channels in crustaceans Timothy Bartness bartness@gsu.edu Professor Regulation of metabolism and body fat in hamsters Michael Black seawater@gsu.edu Adjunct Faculty Neural mechanisms of dominant/subordinate relationships in lizards and fish Laura Carruth biollc@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Neural and hormonal control of bird song Andrew Clancy bioanc@langate.gsu.edu Lecturer Role of sex steroids in brain function and behavior in hamsters Charles Derby cderby@gsu.edu Professor Chemosensory neurobiology Richard Dix rdix@gsu.edu Professor Molecular Genetics/Neurobiology Donald Edwards biodhe@langate,gsu.edu Regents' Professor Integrative neurobiology and behavior of crayfish Kyle Frantz biokjf@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Neurobehavioral effects of drugs of abuse in developing rats Matthew Grober mgrober@gsu.edu Associate Professor Neural and hormonal mechanisms of sex reversal in fish Julia Hilliard biojkh@langate.gsu.edu Professor, Eminent Scholar Viral pathology and growth in the brain Chun Jiang biocjj@langate.gsu.edu Professor Chemosensory ion channels in the control of breathing Paul Katz pkatz@gsu.edu Professor Neural mechanisms of rhythmic pattern generation in mollusks Anne Murphy amurphy@gsu.edu Associate Professor Neural mechanisms of gender differences in pain and analgesia Sarah Pallas bioslp@langate.gsu.edu Professor Developmental plasticity in sensory systems; recovery of function after brain trauma. Vincent Rehder biovre@langate.gsu.edu Professor Mechanisms of cellular and environmental control of neuronal growth cones Phang C. Tai biopct@langate.gsu.edu Regents' Professor Sensory receptors, membrane transport 10
  • 11. William Walthall biowww@langate.gsu.edu Associate Professor Molecular control of neural development in the nematode Chemistry Name Position Interests Alphons Baumstark chealb@langate.gsu.edu Professor and Chair Organic chemistry Markus Germann chemwg@langate.gsu.edu Professor, Georgia Distinguished Cancer Scientist Magnetic resonance imaging and NMR studies of nucleic acids and proteins Kathryn Grant kbgrant@gsu.edu Associate Professor The serotonin transporter in antidepressant drug resistance Lucjan Strekowski chells@langate.gsu.edu Professor Organic chemistry Jenny Yang chejjy@langate.gsu.edu Professor Mechanisms of calcium-binding affinity Computer Science Name Position Interests Saeid Belkasim sbelkasim@cs.gsu.edu Associate Professor Digital signal processing Anu Bourgeois abourgeois@cs.gsu.edu Associate Professor Parallel processing Robert Harrison rharrison@cs.gsu.edu Professor, Georgia Distinguished Cancer Scientist Simulation; randomized and parallel approaches to difficult problems in scientific computing Yi Pan ypan@cs.gsu.edu Professor Optical and optoelectronic parallel computers Sushil Prasad sprasad@cs.gsu.edu Professor Parallel and distributed algorithms and data structures Raj Sunderraman raj@cs.gsu.edu Professor Database design Michael Weeks mweeks@cs.gsu.edu Associate Professor Digital signal processing Alex Zelikovsky azelikovsky@cs.gsu.edu Associate Professor Computational biology, graph theory Yanqing Zhang Assistant Professor Artificial intelligence, computational intelligence 11
  • 12. yzhang@cs.gsu.edu Ying Zhu yzhu@cs.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Computer graphics, biomedical visualization, animats Xaolin Hu xhu@cs.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Modeling and simulation, cooperative robotic systems, autonomous mobile robots Educational Psychology and Special Education Name Position Interests Jacqueline S. Laures-Gore jlaures@gsu.edu Assistant Professor Adult neurogenic communication disorders, special emphasis on communication disorders after stroke and physiological stress. Mathematics & Statistics Name Position Interests Marina Arav matmxa@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Bioinformatics: 3-D Reconstruction of Biological Images, Math Models in Neuroscience Igor Belykh matixb@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Dynamical systems, Neural Networks, Nonlinear Phenomena Guantao Chen gchen@mathstat.gsu.edu Professor Graph Theory, Probability, Operations Research, Ad Hoc Networks Robert Clewley Assistant Professor Application and development of reduction methods for neuroscience and biomechanics Johannes Hattingh jhattingh@mathstat.gsu.edu Professor Research in Graph Theory with an emphasis on domination in graphs. Yu-Sheng Hsu yhsu@mathstat.gsu.edu Professor Biostatistics Zhongshan Li zli@mathstat.gsu.edu Professor Qualitative matrix theory, combinatorial matrix theory, graph theory Gengsheng (Jeff) Qin matgjq@langate.gsu.edu Associate Professor Biostatistics Andrey Shilnikov ashilnikov@mathstat.gsu.edu Associate Professor Dynamical systems, bifurcations, chaos, neurodynamics Alexandra Smirnova smim@mathstat.gsu.edu Associate Professor Theoretical and computational aspects of applied inverse problems; dynamical systems Yichuan Zhao yzhao@mathstat.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Biostatistics, statistical data analysis, and computational method. 12
  • 13. Philosophy Name Position Interests William Edmundson wedmundson@gsu.edu Professor Neuroscience and neuroethics Eddy Nahmias enahmias@gsu.edu Assistant Professor Philosophy of mind, Moral Psychology, Philosophy of Science, Neuroeconomics, Neuroethics George Rainbolt phlgwr@langate.gsu.edu Professor Medical Ethics Andrea Scarantino phlams@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Philosophy of mind (esp. emotion theory) and Philosophy of Science Physics & Astronomy Name Position Interests Gennady Cymbalyuk gcym@phy-astr.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Computational Neuroscience, dynamical systems, animats Mukesh Dhamala Assistant Professor Nikolaus Dietz ndietz@gsu.edu Associate Professor Interactions of radiation with matter, semi-conduction material growth, solid state and biological interfacing Unil G. Perera uperera@gsu.edu Professor Artificial neurons/sensors Mark Stockman mstockman@gsu.edu Professor Modelling semiconductor-nanostructure based neurons and sensors Brian Thoms phybdt@panther.gsu.edu Associate Professor Characterizing semiconductor nanostructure based neurons and systems Xiaochun He xhe@gsu.edu Associate Professor Algorithm development for pattern recognition and data analysis Psychology Name Position Interests Lauren B. Adamson ladamson@gsu.edu Professor Communication development in children with developmental disorders including autism Sara Brosnan sbrosnan@gsu.edu Assistant Professor Economic decision making behavior in primates, social cognition, evolution of behavior Marsha Clarkson mclarkson@gsu.edu Associate Professor Development of auditory processing in infants and children, psychoacoustics Kim Huhman khuhman@gsu.edu Associate Professor Neurobiology of stress, anxiety and depression, neuroendocrinology and behavior, circadian rhythms Tricia Z. King psytzk@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Developmental and clinical neuropsychology, acquired brain injury, emotion 13
  • 14. Erin B. McClure Tone psyebm@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Brain development, social behavior, anxiety/mood disorders Mary Morris psymkm@langate.gsu.edu Associate Professor Developmental and clinical neuropsychology, developmental learning disabilities, acquired brain injury. Robin Morris psyrdm@langate.gsu.edu Regents' Professor Developmental and clinical neuropsychology; attention related disabilities; acquired brain injury Michael Owren owren@gsu.edu Associate Professor Primate communication, emotion and vocal behavior; speech evolution, comparative cognition Marise Parent psymbp@langate.gsu.edu Associate Professor Neural mechanisms of learning and memory, behavioral pharmacology Aras Petrulis psyaxp@langate.gsu.edu Assistant Professor Neurobiology of social behavior and recognition Diana L. Robins drobins@gsu.edu Assistant Professor Developmental and clinical neuropsychology, autism and pervasive developmental disorders, emotion processing. Rose Sevcik psyras@langate.gsu.edu Professor Neurodevelopmental disabilities, cognition and language David Washburn lrcdaw@langate.gsu.edu Professor Comparative cognition, attention and executive function, individual differences in training and decision making Walter Wilczynski wwilczynski@gsu.edu Professor Neural and hormonal mechanisms of reproductive behavior and animal communication, neuroendocrinology 2. Institutional Mission GSU recognizes that a combination of academic excellence and urban relevance is central to its development and has deliberately and carefully chosen to continue to emphasize a number of features, most of which were listed in the 2000 University Strategic Plan: From the University’s Strategic Plan: http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwact/univ_strategic_plan/2000_2005_strategicplan.pdf • creation of a learning-centered academic culture that provides educational opportunities for qualified students, traditional as well as non-traditional; • adherence in principle and practice to liberal education in arts and sciences as well as in the professional disciplines; • delivery of undergraduate instruction and pedagogy of high quality, conducted by senior as well as junior faculty; • selection, design, and implementation of high quality graduate programs and activities that contribute substantially to the intellectual and creative activities of the University; 14
  • 15. • provision of a distinctive education to our students that takes advantage of our location in a vital metropolis, a center of international commerce and a center of governance; • expectation of a faculty and student body that participate actively in scholarly pursuits, especially those that make contributions through research or professional activities to the intellectual, cultural, and social well-being of the regional, national, and international communities; • support for a curriculum with intercultural and international perspectives; and • development of programs that facilitate lifelong learning and career development for students. This proposal supports the university's strategic goal of providing educational opportunities for all qualified students, traditional as well as non-traditional, and of developing programs that facilitate lifelong learning and career development for students. Based on present experiences, the departmental faculty is sensitive to the challenges inherent in graduate programs for non-traditional students, and is eminently qualified to offer them an opportunity at a doctorate. The overarching goal of GSU is to become one of the nation's premier research universities located in an urban setting. The University will achieve this goal through the continual pursuit of excellence in its instructional and strategic research programs. The faculty members engaged in neuroscience-related research together possess unique strengths that make the development of a Ph.D. program in Neuroscience a logical next step in our growth. For example, in 2004, GSU formalized three multi-disciplinary research foci that build on our strongest and most successful research programs. The University is investing heavily in them. These three foci are the Brains & Behavior Program, the Molecular Basis of Disease Program, and the Urban Health Program. In addition, GSU recently established an Institute of Public Health as an initiative to further the public health program. Neuroscience and behavioral research are important components of these programs, and development of a doctoral program will significantly enhance these multi-disciplinary programs. It is this combination of strengths that sets the proposed degree program apart from Neuroscience-related programs elsewhere in the state and in the region. Thus, our proposed program supports the goals of the selection, design, and implementation of high quality graduate programs and activities that contribute substantially to the intellectual and creative activities of the University and the expectation of a faculty and student body that participate actively in scholarly pursuits, especially those that make contributions through research or professional activities to the intellectual, cultural, and social well- being of the regional, national, and international communities. In 2002, GSU was designated by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as one of the “doctoral/research universities – extensive.” Of the nearly four 15
  • 16. thousand colleges and universities classified, GSU is one of only 101 to make this elite roster. Among the“doctoral/research universities – extensive” institutions in Georgia, only one has a Ph.D. program in Neuroscience or a closely allied field, despite the fact that it is a fast-growing discipline. Of the 21 U.S. institutions listed as GSU’s “Urban 13” peer institutions, 8 have a Ph.D. program in Neuroscience. With more than half of our peer institutions having such a program this indicates that GSU is behind the curve. Therefore, the University System is clearly in need of a doctoral program in Neuroscience such as can be offered at GSU. Implementation of this program will enhance the University's position in a select group of prestigious universities. Having a Ph.D. program in Neuroscience will have strong positive impact on the research programs in quite a few departments at GSU. Delivery of undergraduate instruction and pedagogy of high quality, conducted by senior as well as junior faculty. Delivering undergraduate instruction of high quality is also a fundamental mission of the University. The teaching of many sections by untenured, part time and visiting instructors undermines this goal. The strategic plan calls for the replacement of most of the visiting and part time instructors by tenure track faculty. Unless senior faculty hold an important Departmental, Center or College administrative position, all senior faculty are expected to teach. This teaching responsibility includes undergraduate instruction as well as graduate instruction. Graduate students will be allowed to teach in neuroscience courses only after they complete a teaching practicum course, and this teaching is restricted to laboratory courses, not full-lecture courses. This mentored approach will support the goal of delivery of undergraduate instruction and pedagogy of high quality. Moreover, the graduate teaching assistants will be more accountable because they have a vested interest in establishing their teaching abilities. In summary, the proposed program fully supports the current strategic plans of GSU. Our proposed program will not require an alteration of the institutional mission, and meshes ideally with the development plans of the Neuroscience Institutes. There is a request for funds to support some administrative staff and some graduate assistantships, but whether this is funded by additional appropriations from the State of Georgia, or via GSU redistribution of funds is not known at this time. The proposed Ph.D. program in Neuroscience does not call for course delivery formats that are new or different for the University. 1. Does this program further the mission of your institution? Yes. 2. Will the proposed program require a significant alteration of the institutional mission? No. 3. Will the program require the addition of a new organizational unit to the institution (e.g. college, school, division or department)? 16
  • 17. The new organizational unit, the Neuroscience Insitute, has already been been created and currently a director is being sought. 4. Is it likely that a SACS visit for substantive change will be necessary? Not in the forseeable future. 5. How does the proposed program help meet the priorities/goals of your strategic plan? See above. 6. Will this proposal require an addition or change in your institution’s strategic plan? No. 7. Will the program require an increase in state appropriation within the next five years? The program is expected to attract additional students. 8. If this is a baccalaureate program, will you be asking for an exception to the 120 hour expectation or to the core curriculum? N/A 9. Are there program delivery formats that will be new or different for your institution? No. Need Provide a brief justification for why the state needs graduates from this program and for why the University System needs this program. Give a brief justification for why your institution should offer the program. Neuroscience departments or degree-offering Neuroscience programs may be found in over 130 research universities across the United States. Data generated from surveys conducted by the Association of Neuroscience Departments and Programs (ANDP) in 1986, 1991 and 1998 reveal a growing trend among prospective graduate students to apply to these Neuroscience programs. In its survey of U.S. graduate programs in Neuroscience, the ANDP reports that the number of applications per program has increased 45% from 1991 and 154% from 1986. Additionally, the average number of students enrolled per program has increased steadily. 17
  • 18. The ANDP survey also reveals an increasing trend for students to earn advanced degrees specifically in “Neuroscience” rather than in traditional biological or behavioral sciences (see Table 1). Table 1. Degrees offered in Neuroscience vs. Traditional Fields Survey Year 1986 1991 1998 Ph.D.-Neuroscience 24%( of Total) 28% 66% Ph.D.-Tradition 74% 54% 30% Other 5% 14% 4% We realize that there is a fledgling Ph.D. Neuroscience program at the University of Georgia. In addition to serving different graduate student demographics here at GSU (including the large numbers of minority Neuroscience graduate students as well as the large urban/suburban population surrounding our Atlanta-based institution), the proposed program also differs from that at the University of Georgia in the large numbers of graduate faculty directly in the Neurosciences as well as the Neuroscience-related Centers and Programs spawned by this heavy concentration of Neuroscience faculty. Provide a brief description of whether and why students will enroll in the program. What kinds of data do you intend to use to show student demand for the program? We have conducted a survey of students currently connected with the Brains & Behavior and Center for Behavioral Neuroscience Programs. Most are currently working on a degree in Biology or Psychology; a few are from the other departments involved in the Brains & Behavior Area of Focus. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Out of 51 respondents, 31 agree or strongly agree that they would have applied to such a program, and only 10 said they would not, with the rest neutral. Only 8 out of 51 disagreed with the statement “I would prefer to earn my degree in Neuroscience” SURVEY RESULTS What department are you currently a student in? Response Total Biology 24 Chemistry 1 Computer Information Systems 1 Computer Science 4 Mathematics and Statistics 1 Philosophy 2 Physics and Astronomy 4 18
  • 19. Psychology 14 Other (please specify) 0 Total Respondents 51/51 Some of my research interests lie within the field of Neuroscience: Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 35 32 Agree 13 6 Neutral 2 0 Disagree 1 0 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 I have completed Neuroscience-related coursework while in graduate school. Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 33 32 Agree 8 5 Neutral 3 0 Disagree 7 1 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 A degree in Neuroscience would accurately reflect my graduate training. Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 26 24 Agree 10 8 Neutral 7 2 Disagree 8 4 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 I would have applied for a graduate degree in Neuroscience had it been offered by Georgia State University. Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 25 24 Agree 7 5 Neutral 9 4 Disagree 10 5 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 19
  • 20. A degree in Neuroscience would prepare me to pursue my career goals. Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 23 22 Agree 16 10 Neutral 9 4 Disagree 3 2 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 I would prefer to earn my degree in Neuroscience Response Total Biol & Psych Students Strongly Agree 19 18 Agree 11 9 Neutral 13 8 Disagree 8 3 Total Respondents 51/51 38/38 Do you have a faculty member from another department at Georgia State University on your dissertation or advisory committee? Response Total Yes 10 No 20 I haven't formed a committee yet. 21 Total Respondents 51/51 Do you have a faculty member from another university in Atlanta on your dissertation or advisory committee? Response Total Yes 14 No 16 I haven't formed a committee yet. 21 Total Respondents 51/51 As a graduate student have you taken a course related to Neuroscience in another department at Georgia State University? Response Total Yes 20 No 31 20
  • 21. Total Respondents 51/51 As a graduate student have you taken a course related to Neuroscience at another university in Atlanta? Response Total Yes 11 No 40 Total Respondents 51/51 How would a Neuroscience degree at Georgia State University be beneficial? Total Respondents 24/51 Answers: 1. I believe Georgia State University Neuroscience program is competitive with any other university in USA. But as a physics graduate student it would be better to have more bridge courses (6000) so that non Neuroscience majors can also follow Neuroscience 8000 courses more easily. 2. Having a defined degree in Neuroscience may attract more students with the same goals. This would allow for better communication within a tight community. As it is currently set-up at Georgia State University with only a degree in Biology allowed, the interests of the students seem far too dispersed making it difficult to form collaborations. 3. A Neuroscience degree will reflect better my knowledge and my specialty. It will be more specific than a degree in Biology, which is too general in my opinion. 4. The degree itself wouldn't be particularly important for me considering that my interests are largely clinical, however I believe that having a department with a strong Neuroscience program allows clinical students broaden their experiences. 5. A Neuroscience degree would reflect both my personal interests as well as my career goals. Given the strong emphasis and growth in the Neurosciences with regard to public interest, scientific interest, and funding, a specialized degree would reflect my focus furthering my ability to work within these sectors. 6. I think a Neuroscience degree at Georgia State University would allow students following their graduate work to appeal more to institutions that are looking for candidates with specific requirements. I think also students looking for a Neuroscience- specific program would apply to Georgia State University when otherwise they would not have because of the absence of such a program. 7. The bio dept already has a neuro degree 8. As I am from Physics, I find it difficult to answer this question. 9. my training is in Neuroscience, not biology, so I would rather say I'm getting my Ph.D. in Neuroscience than saying a Ph.D. in Biology with emphasis in Neurobiology and Behavior. 10. would allow students who wish to specialize in that field to do that...instead of having to specialize in a round-about way 21
  • 22. 11. It would generate faculty and coursework that would be relevant to my career goals, and attract more students that have interdisciplinary interests, in between psychology and biology 12. In terms of having the Neuroscience program separate from the rest of biology, it would more reflect my graduate training as compared to a degree that vaguely states "Arts & Science". 13. I guess I don't see a big difference between Neuroscience and behavioral Neuroscience. 14. It would accurately reflect the work that is being done in our labs and the coursework that we are taking. More specificity in our awarded degrees would be beneficial once we are looking for jobs as well. 15. A Neuroscience degree would most likely minimize the amount of coursework I take that is not directly related to Neuroscience, i.e., ethics in psychology and history of psychology. Additionally, a Ph.D. in Neuroscience would be more reflective of the training I received during graduate school for any future employers/collaborators. Finally, this degree program could bring together students with very similar interests into a single, unified program, rather than those individuals who are interested in Neuroscience being a marginal group within departments with diverse interests. 16. It would make it easier for the Neuro and behavior graduate students to seek a job in the Neuroscience field. 17. A Neuroscience degree would be beneficial because their degree would show that they focused on Neuroscience during their graduate career. This would mean that a student has a specific knowledge and understanding of the Neuroscience field. 18. I think having a Neuroscience degree at GSU could potentially benefit the institution by making more explicit the school's commitment to and offerings in Neuroscience, thereby allowing GSU to attract more Neuroscience-focused graduate students. 19. It would better fit students who now are split between Biology and Psychology and may be a "draw" for potential applicants. 20. Would add classes that are more focused on important fundamentals of Neuroscience. Specifically... Neuron membrane potentials, channels and essential biophysics. How gene expression leads to changes in the nervous system. More focused classes on brain areas and function. 21. It would more accurately portray my graduate work. While I doubt that a Ph.D. in biology would hinder my career as compared to a Ph.D. in Neuroscience, all of my course work and research is 100% Neuroscience related. It seems somewhat foolish to not get a degree in what I am actually doing. On a similar note, I think a Neuroscience degree/department would increase the profile of the great Neuroscience faculty we have at GSU which should benefit the university as a whole. 22. It would reflect our field of research more directed and specifically. 23. Well for people interested particularly in Neuroscience, a focused training and orientation towards the aspects of Neuroscience would have been particularly better. As is quite obvious nowadays, Neuroscience has emerged as an independent discipline, which includes elements from Biology, Physics, Math, Statistics, Computation, Psychology & Chemistry. So in my opinion a solid and rigorous graduate level training in Neuroscience along with the specific tools would have been particularly beneficial for the 22
  • 23. students who are genuinely interested in Neuroscience regardless of the background s/he is coming from. Neuroscience is truly an interdisciplinary subject, and so people from any discipline who really want to pursue it can come be trained, get benefit and make some important contributions for the subject. So if a degree program in NS was opened in GSU and different groups are able to get trained I hope that will really benefit NS research as a whole and also make GSU prominent in one of the core areas of research in this century. 24. I think a Neuroscience degree at GSU is a great idea. As a psychology student, I find that my course requirements are tailored preferentially to the other psychology concentrations (clinical, developmental, community, etc.). As a result, I have to spend time and effort on courses that are not particularly relevant to my academic pursuits, and take courses through other departments to supplement. I think a Neuroscience degree would solve some of these problems. Do you have any other comments with regard to having a Neuroscience degree program at GSU? Total Respondents 17/51 Answers 1. I think this would also attract new faculty looking for a more defined community and curriculum to teach. 2. I am strongly in favor for a degree in Neuroscience at GSU. 3. From my perspective as a CLN student, I like the idea of having the ability to work in different settings (e.g. wet labs) and with students and faculty from the Neuroscience field. 4. I'm split on this topic. On the one hand, I think a higher degree of specialization would be beneficial. On the other hand, I do think a degree in Biology gives students the opportunity and appeal of being educated more broadly about the field (however it's possible that some see this as a disadvantage). I don't think I've missed out at any opportunities at this point because I'm in a Biology program and not a Neuroscience- specific degree program, but I think the positives of having this program could outweigh the negatives. 5. I have enjoyed it 6. None 7. Please establish a Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience 8. No 9. I strongly support it. 10. Neuroscience program would attract lot more graduate students into GSU 11. I would hope that developing a Neuroscience degree program would not mean excluding any of the interdisciplinary involvement of students and faculty that is already occurring. 12. I worry about the impact it would have on biology and psychology. Similarly, would Neuroscience grad students still be taking Psychology and Biology courses, or would they have special "Neuroscience" courses? Overall, however, I feel the pros would outweigh the cons (especially in the long term). 23
  • 24. 13. I believe a Neuroscience degree program would bring in students (and research) whose role would be to bridge some of the segregation between the sciences. 14. I think having a Neuroscience degree program would heavily benefit Neuroscience at GSU in general. It could bring more attention to the great research being done at GSU by pulling some of the great work out of the biology grouping and into a class of its own. By the same token, I do not think it would hinder the biology department in any way. GSU is a strong school for collaborations, and the Neuroscience and biology departments would be closely bound. I only see benefits in having degree programs specific to the work being done. 15. I would extremely appreciate for such specialization.. 16. Well since this questionnaire is being submitted by me, I hope that something really happens and may help us in tackling some challenging problems of Neuroscience. 17. Should a Neuroscience degree-granting program be implemented, I hope that students currently enrolled in other programs will be allowed to transfer into it. Students Estimate the number of students who will graduate annually from the program in the steady state. What percentage will likely be from other existing programs? Which programs will the students come from? In the Biology and Psychology departments, there are currently 33 tenure-track or tenured faculty members working in Neuroscience-related areas. More than 75 tenure- track or tenured faculty are currently in the Brains & Behavior Area of Focus (http://www.biology.gsu.edu/brains&behavior/ people.html) and we are currently conducting searches for new positions. All of the Neuroscience-related tenure-track faculty in Biology and Psychology are expected to have at least one Ph.D. student in the program. Many will have two students, and some of the Neuroscience-related faculty in other departments will also have students. Thus we estimate a total of 50 students enrolled at any one time. For a 5 year program, we would graduate ~10 Ph.D.s in Neuroscience per year. Because the M.S. degree will be earned automatically as the students attain candidacy for the Ph.D., one M.S. degree for every Ph.D. will also be generated. Budget 1. Estimate the steady-state cost of the program (in current dollars) and indicate the percentages from reallocation, student fees, grants, and outside dollars. 2. Estimate start-up costs for the program and indicate possible fund sources. A Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience would not require any additional resources at its inception; it is cost-neutral. It would be administered through the Neuroscience Institute, whose budget is controlled by the College of Arts and Sciences. In the future, some expenses could change if additional faculty are hired. We would expect that with the ability to recruit more and higher quality graduate students, enrollment would increase. 24
  • 25. Increases in quality and number of graduate students will greatly facilitate the faculty’s research efforts in increasing federal grant support and thereby indirect costs. Some additional infrastructure research-related support could therefore derive from indirect costs associated with these grants. It may be, however, that additional funds would be required for an administrative assistant, if the level of paperwork/bookkeeping involved in administering the degree program reached a level whereby it impeded the efforts of current administrative assistants to conduct their work. For this and any other additional monies, negotiations with the College of Arts and Sciences, Department Chairs and/or other administrators would occur. Facilities If additional facilities are needed, how they will be acquired. At least two new life sciences research buildings are currently being planned with ground breaking already occurring and detailed architectural plans being constructed. This will provide space for most current faculty, and hopefully there will be expansion space identified in the course of the planning process. Curriculum and Delivery 1. Are there special characteristics of the curriculum (as compared to similar programs). Yes, see below. 2. Will the program require new or special student services? No 3. Will the program be attractive to underserved populations? Yes. A Ph.D. program in Neuroscience at Georgia State in Atlanta will serve the large minority population here in Atlanta that is not served in the State of Georgia. Neuroscience Curriculum Students in the Neuroscience Ph.D. Program must fulfill all requirements of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and their department of enrollment as well as Neuroscience program requirements. A Master’s degree will be earned in the course of the Neuroscience Ph.D. program, although a terminal M.S. degree is not proposed. In addition to course work and research available at the university, students are encouraged to take advantage of research and professional experiences, conferences, workshops and seminars related to Neurosciences nation- and world-wide. 25
  • 26. A. Coursework Requirements A minimum of 90 hours of graduate credit is required for the Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience. To satisfy the requirements for the degree, the student must complete successfully: 1. A minimum of 30 hours of graduate classroom coursework, which must include: - Neuroscience core courses (11 hours) - Neuroscience electives (4 hours) - Statistics core course (3 hours) - Introduction to Graduate Studies core courses (4 hours) - Topics, Concepts and Seminar courses (8 hours) 2. Students are required to take a minimum of 60 semester hours of Research. This requirement can be satisfied by enrolling in Biol 8800/9999 or Psyc 8999/9999 or similar courses in other departments. At least 30 hours of Dissertation Research are required. Students may enroll in Dissertation Research only after they have chosen a research advisor and prepared a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their Dissertation Committee. 3. Ph.D. students are expected to earn a MS or MA degree en-route to the completion of the Neuroscience Ph.D. degree. To do so, students are required to register for a relevant course in their department such as Biol 8888 (Non-thesis Master’s Paper Preparation) or Psyc 8999 (Psychology Masters’ Thesis Research) during the preparation of their dissertation proposal. The dissertation proposal will count as the Masters’ thesis. With acceptance of the proposal, students who have completed their Ph.D. coursework will have earned the 40 credit hours necessary for the completion of the MS degree. MS degree requirements: - Neuroscience core courses (11 hours) - Neuroscience electives (4 hours) - Statistics core course (3 hours) - Introduction to Graduate Studies core courses (4 hours) - Topics, Concepts and Seminar courses (8 hours) - Biol 8800 or equivalent (4 hours) - Biol 6900 or equivalent (2 hours) - Biol 8888 or Psyc 8999 (4 hours) or equivalent 26
  • 27. PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE A. Core Courses (11 hours) Biol 8010/ Psyc 8616 Cellular Neurobiology (4) Biol 8020/ Psyc 8617 Integrative Neurobiology (4) Biol 8070 /Psyc 8618 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience (3) B. Electives (4 hours) Biol 6074 Developmental Biology (4) Biol 6094 Developmental Neurobiology (4) Biol 6114 Neural Mechanisms of Regulatory Behavior (4) Biol 6180 Neurobiology Laboratory (4) Biol 6240 Endocrinology (4) Biol 6241 Hormones and Behavior (4) Biol 6242 Circadian Rhythms (4) Biol 6246 Advanced Animal Physiology (4) Biol 6248 Cell Physiology (4) Biol 6500 Human Genetics (4) Biol 6696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4) Biol 8220 Molecular Cell Biology (4) Biol 8220 Physiology and Genetics of Prokaryotes (4) Biol 8620 Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics (4) Biol 8910 Topics in Biology (4) Chem 6610 Advanced Biochemistry (3) Phil 6130 Philosophy of Science (3) Phil 6330 Philosophy of Mind (3) Psyc 6116 Primate Behavior (3) Psyc 6130 Sensation and Perception (3) Psyc 6140 Introduction to Psychophysiology (4) Psyc 7560 Psychology of Animal Behavior (3) Psyc 8010 Research Methods in Psychology (3) Psyc 8420 Psychological Research Statistics II (3) Psyc 8430 Psychological Research Statistics III (3) Psyc 8615 Functional Human Neuroanatomy (3) Psyc 8620 Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology (3) Psyc 8630 Developmental Neuropsychology (3) Psyc 8640 Psychopharmacology (3) Psyc 9140 Neuropsychological Assessment (3) C. Statistics Core (3 hours) Psyc 8410 Psychological Research Statistics I (3) Biol 6744 Biostatistics (3) 27
  • 28. D. Introduction to Graduate Studies (4 hours) Biol 8550 Introduction to Graduate Studies (1) Bio/Psyc 6801 Survival Skills in Academia (3) E. Topics/Concept and Seminar Courses (8 hours) Biol 8110 Concepts in Neurobiology (2) Biol 8700 Seminar (1) Biol 8950 Topics in Behavior and Neurobiology (1) Biol 8960 Topics in Cell Physiology and Biochemistry (1) Biol 8970 Topics in Molecular Biological Sciences (1) Phil 8130 Seminar in Philosophy of Science (1) Phil 8330 Seminar in Philosophy of Mind (1) Psyc 6800 Seminar (1-3) Psyc 8910 Topics in Neuropsychology (3) Psyc 8956 Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience (1) Psyc 9900 Seminar in Psychology (1-3) Sample Program of Study Year 1 (Fall) Biol 8010/ Psyc 8616 Cellular Neurobiology (4) Bio 8550 Introduction to Graduate Studies (1) Year 1 (Spring) Biol 8020/ Psyc 8617 Integrative Neurobiology (4) Bio/PsycXXXX Topics, Concepts or Seminar Course (1-3) Year 2 (Fall) Biol 8070 /Psyc 8618 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience (3) Psyc 8410/ Biol 6744 Statistics Core Course (3) Year 2 (Spring) Bio/Psyc 6801 Survival Skills in Academia (3) Bio/PsycXXXX Electives course (4) Bio/PsycXXXX Topics, Concepts or Seminar Course (1-3) Year 3 (Fall) 28
  • 29. Qualifying Exam Bio/PsycXXXX Topics, Concepts or Seminar Course (1-3) Year 3 (Spring) Bio 8888/Psyc 8999 Non-thesis Master’s Paper (4) Bio/PsycXXXX Topics, Concepts or Seminar Course (1-3) Taken over the course of residency at GSU: Bio 8800/Psyc 8999 Research (26) Bio9999/Psyc 9999 Dissertation Research (30) Collaboration It should be noted here that efficient use of state resources is an essential ingredient in new program approval. If there is any doubt about how you will address the questions below, a conference is recommended. 1. If there are similar programs in your service area, how will the proposed program affect them? We might compete for students with Emory University, but to some extent we already do, and we would expect to be more competitive with the proposed degree program. The Ph.D. Program at the University of Georgia is fledgling and has fewer ‘card- carrying’ Neuroscientists than we have at GSU and far fewer supporting entities such as Neuroscience-related Centers. In addition, the demographics of the graduate students are quite disparate between the University of Georgia and GSU with our institution serving a substantially larger minority population and massively larger urban/suburban area. 2. Do you plan a collaborative arrangement with another institution or entity? Not in terms of formal educational collaborations, but GSU students are involved in research collaborations and may take classes from faculty at other institutions including Emory University and Georgia Tech. Two University of Georgia Neuroscience-related faculty members are members of the CBN headquartered at GSU. Other Are there other elements of the proposed program that might give the staff greater insight into the overall value of this program to the University System strategic plan? The strategic plan for GSU calls for increasing interdepartmental research in areas of excellence. One such area identified is “Brains & Behavior.” To date, this has developed into a vibrant association of faculty and students spanning multiple departments in the natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and humanities. Mechanisms are in place 29
  • 30. for cross-departmental scholarly activities and collaborative research endeavors. Establishment of a neuroscience degree program would further unite the faculty and students participating in this initiative specifically, and align with the University’s larger strategy of training students in cross disciplinary subjects. We believe that the M.S./Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience will be a large jewel among the many jewels of the University System of Georgia because of its impact on the clinically and economically important area of Neuroscience research, as outlined above. We presently are supplying most of the minority neuroscience trained Ph.D. and M.S. graduates nationally, and this program, with an official M.S./Ph.D. in Neuroscience, will serve to enhance this. 30

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