Study Questions.
• How has sentence ambiguity been used to study the psycholinguistics
of grammar.
• Describe the classica...
Language
• Articulatory Phonetics
» Voicing
PercentageIdentified
100
80
60
40
20
0
Voice-onset time (ms)
40 50 60 7010 20 30
Language
• Is speech special?
» Do we pos...
Language
• Articulatory Phonetics
» Vowels
◊Positioning and part of tongue
– Height
High (/i/ beet)
Med (/e/ bait)
Low (/a...
Language
• The search for invariants
» Distinctive features
» Problems with a simple bottom-up approach
◊There are no peri...
Language
• The search for invariants
Language
• The search for invariants
» Phonemic information is presented in parallel
◊Coarticulation
◊E.g. Cf. /M/ in “Tim...
Language
• Top down processes
» Phonemic restoration effect (Warren, 1970)
◊Their respective legi*latures
◊Found a *eel on...
Language
• Perceiving conversational speech
» Two main problems:
◊There are no physical boundaries between words
– Anna Ma...
Language
• Perceiving conversational speech
Language
W h a d’ a y a D oo w i n
• Perceiving conversational speech
Language
• Top-down processes and speech perception
» Phonemic perception
◊The McGurk Effect
» Sentence comprenension
◊Mil...
Language
• Top-down processes and speech perception
◊Miller & Isard (1963)
–Results
Gram. Nonsem. Nongram.
No noise 89% 79...
Language
• Syntax
» Finite state grammar
◊E.g, Miller (1958).
0
1
3 2
0´Start
Finish
S
N
N X
S
G
G
X
Language
• Syntax
» Finite state grammar
◊E.g, Miller (1958).
Structured Random
L1 L2 R1 R2
SSXG NNSG GNSX NXGS
NNXSG NNSX...
Language
• Syntax
» Finite state grammar
◊E.g, Miller (1958).
Language
• Syntax
» Finite state grammar
◊Problems with finite state grammar
– Linguistic competence
– Judgements of gramm...
Language
• Syntax
» Phrase structure grammar
» Constituent analysis
The boy hit the ball
Verb phrase (VP)Noun phrase (NP)
...
Sentence
VPNP
Verb NP
Cop. Part. Noun
Pronoun
They flyingare planes
Sentence
VPNP
They
Pronoun Verb NP
NounAdj
flyingare p...
Language
• Syntax
» Transformational grammar
◊Some ambiguous sentences are not explained by phrase
structure
E.g, Visiting...
Language
• Syntax
» Resolving ambiguity (McKay, 1966)
◊Lexical ambiguity
– E.g., Although he was continually bothered by t...
Language
• Syntax
» Resolving ambiguity (McKay, 1966)
◊Results
Language
• Syntax
» Case grammar
◊Semantic analysis involves determining the semantic role of
each word or concept and com...
Language
• Syntax
» Interaction between syntax and semantics
◊Fillenbaum (1974)
– Had subjects read and then paraphrase se...
Nice we’re having weather isn’t it?
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Aphasia: Language deficits resulting from brain-related
disorders and inj...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Broca’s Aphasia
Paul Broca
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Broca’s Aphasia
◊Production Deficits
– Problems in producing fluent langu...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Broca’s Aphasia
◊Comprehension deficits
– Unable to analyze precise gramm...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Wernicke’s Aphasia
◊Carl Wernicke, 1870s
– Examined two patients
Problems...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Wernicke’s Aphasia
◊Production deficits
– Sounds fluent (e.g., foreign la...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Wernicke’s Aphasia
◊Comprehension deficits
– Do not recognize the incompr...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Classical localization model (Lichtheim, 1885; Geschwand,
1967)
Conceptua...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Classical localization model (Lichtheim, 1885; Geschwand,
1967)
◊Damage t...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Conduction aphasia
◊Damage to the connection between Wernicke’s and Broca...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Conduction aphasia
◊Production deficits
– Problems producing spontaneous ...
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» Conduction aphasia
Conceptual
Information
Wernicke’sBroca’s
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» A prediction
Conceptual
Information
Wernicke’sBroca’s
Brain & Language
• Neuropsychology of language
» A prediction
◊ Disconnecting Wernicke’s from the conceptual area
should l...
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain
» ERP studies
◊The N400: Semantic violations
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain
» ERP studies
◊The P600: Syntactic Positive Shift (synt...
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain
◊Dispreferred continuation of ambiguous sentences
– E.g...
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain
◊Swaab et al. (1997)
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain
◊A caveat: Individual differences
– Stimulation mapping...
Brain & Language
• Neurophysiology of
language in the intact brain
◊A caveat: Individual
differences
Cognitive Psychology Chapter 9a Language
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Cognitive Psychology Chapter 9a Language

  1. 1. Study Questions. • How has sentence ambiguity been used to study the psycholinguistics of grammar. • Describe the classical localization model of brain and language. How do different aphasias relate to the model. Give examples. 01/30/15 Oh freddled guntbuggly, thy micturations are to me As plurdled gabbleblothchits on a lugid bee Groop, I implore thee, my foonting turlingdromes And booptiously drangle me with crinkly bindlewurdles Or I will rend thee in the gobberwarts With my blurglecruncheon, see if I don’t Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy • Language » Articulatory Phonetics ◊ Top down processes » Syntax » Lexical and semantic factors ◊ Case Grammar » Neuropsychology of language ◊ Classical Localization Model » Neurophysiology of language
  2. 2. Language • Articulatory Phonetics » Voicing
  3. 3. PercentageIdentified 100 80 60 40 20 0 Voice-onset time (ms) 40 50 60 7010 20 30 Language • Is speech special? » Do we possess specialized neural mechanisms for perceiving speech? » Categorical perception ◊Voice onset-time and distinguishing /d/ from /t/
  4. 4. Language • Articulatory Phonetics » Vowels ◊Positioning and part of tongue – Height High (/i/ beet) Med (/e/ bait) Low (/a/ pot) – Part Front (/I/ bit) Central (but) Back (/o/ boat)
  5. 5. Language • The search for invariants » Distinctive features » Problems with a simple bottom-up approach ◊There are no periods of silence between phonemes –The speech spectrograph
  6. 6. Language • The search for invariants
  7. 7. Language • The search for invariants » Phonemic information is presented in parallel ◊Coarticulation ◊E.g. Cf. /M/ in “Tim” vs. “/M/ in “mad” » We perceive them as the same, but they are different » We perceive the same sound differently according to the context ◊E.g.: Writer vs. Rider ◊E.g.: Insert a silence between /s/ and /i/ --> “ski” Insert a silence between /s/ and /u/ --> “spew”
  8. 8. Language • Top down processes » Phonemic restoration effect (Warren, 1970) ◊Their respective legi*latures ◊Found a *eel on the axle ◊Found a *eel on the shoe
  9. 9. Language • Perceiving conversational speech » Two main problems: ◊There are no physical boundaries between words – Anna Mary candy lights since imp pulp lay things – ( An American delights in simple play things) ◊Speech is sloppy – He wants to kiss this Guy? – Misheard Lyrics (www.kissthisguy.com) – This was the best buy vs. She is a bad girl
  10. 10. Language • Perceiving conversational speech
  11. 11. Language W h a d’ a y a D oo w i n • Perceiving conversational speech
  12. 12. Language • Top-down processes and speech perception » Phonemic perception ◊The McGurk Effect » Sentence comprenension ◊Miller & Isard (1963) – Participants shadow sentences: Grammatic: Bears steal honey from the hive. Semantically incorrect: Bears shoot honey on the highways. Ungrammatic: Across bears eyes honey the bill.
  13. 13. Language • Top-down processes and speech perception ◊Miller & Isard (1963) –Results Gram. Nonsem. Nongram. No noise 89% 79% 56% Noise 63% 22% 3%
  14. 14. Language • Syntax » Finite state grammar ◊E.g, Miller (1958). 0 1 3 2 0´Start Finish S N N X S G G X
  15. 15. Language • Syntax » Finite state grammar ◊E.g, Miller (1958). Structured Random L1 L2 R1 R2 SSXG NNSG GNSX NXGS NNXSG NNSXG NSGXN GNXSG SXSXG SXXSG XGSSN SXNGG Etc. Etc. Etc. Etc.
  16. 16. Language • Syntax » Finite state grammar ◊E.g, Miller (1958).
  17. 17. Language • Syntax » Finite state grammar ◊Problems with finite state grammar – Linguistic competence – Judgements of grammaticity (Chomsky) e.g., Colourless green ideas sleep furiously (For words never paired together) – Judgements of agrammaticity (Miller and Selfridge) e.g., Was he went to the newspaper is in deep end. (For words often paired together) – Resolving/explaining ambiguity e.g., They are cooking apples.
  18. 18. Language • Syntax » Phrase structure grammar » Constituent analysis The boy hit the ball Verb phrase (VP)Noun phrase (NP) NPDet. The Det. the Noun boy Verb hit Noun ball
  19. 19. Sentence VPNP Verb NP Cop. Part. Noun Pronoun They flyingare planes Sentence VPNP They Pronoun Verb NP NounAdj flyingare planes Language • Syntax » Phrase structure grammar ◊Three types of sentences – Grammatical / meaningful: maps onto only one phrase structure. – Nongrammatical: cannot be mapped onto a phrase structure – Grammatical / ambiguous: maps onto more than one phrase structure. e.g., They are flying planes
  20. 20. Language • Syntax » Transformational grammar ◊Some ambiguous sentences are not explained by phrase structure E.g, Visiting relatives can be boring ◊Both interpretations map onto the same phrase structure...but, they map onto different meanings » Surface structure: Superficial appearance (i.e., phrase structure). » Deep structure: The meaning of the sentence. » Transformational rules: convert the deep structure into a surface structure (a sentence ready to be spoke)
  21. 21. Language • Syntax » Resolving ambiguity (McKay, 1966) ◊Lexical ambiguity – E.g., Although he was continually bothered by the cold … – Control: headache ◊Surface ambiguity – E.g., Although Hannibal sent troops over a week ago … – Control: almost ◊Underlying ambiguity – E.g., Knowing that visiting relatives could be bothersome …. – Control: visiting some
  22. 22. Language • Syntax » Resolving ambiguity (McKay, 1966) ◊Results
  23. 23. Language • Syntax » Case grammar ◊Semantic analysis involves determining the semantic role of each word or concept and computing sentence meaning based on that analysis. ◊E.g, A] The key will open the door B] The janitor will open the door with the key – The ‘key’ is the subject of [A] and an object in [B] but serves the same role in each sentence.
  24. 24. Language • Syntax » Interaction between syntax and semantics ◊Fillenbaum (1974) – Had subjects read and then paraphrase several sentences – Normal sentences: Threat: Don’t print that or I will sue you. Control: John got off the bus and went to the store – Perverse/disordered Threat: Don’t print that or I won’t sue you Control: John went in the store and got on the bus. – Results: Perverse: 50% normalized in their paraphrases Disordered: 60 % normalized.
  25. 25. Nice we’re having weather isn’t it?
  26. 26. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Aphasia: Language deficits resulting from brain-related disorders and injury. ◊Very common – 40 % of all strokes produce some aphasia » Broca’s Aphasia ◊Paul Broca - studied patient Leborgne (A.K.A.’Tan’) – Treated for leg injury – Died a few days later – Autopsied brain – Discovered ‘Broca’s area’ – Left Hemisphere dominance for language
  27. 27. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Broca’s Aphasia Paul Broca
  28. 28. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Broca’s Aphasia ◊Production Deficits – Problems in producing fluent language – Range from ‘Tan,tan,tan,…’ to short phrases – Lack function words and grammar May retain idioms (‘fit as a fiddle’) or songs – Proximity to motor cortex Dysarthria: loss of control over articulatory muscles Speech Apraxia: Unable to program voluntary articulatory movements. Paul Broca
  29. 29. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Broca’s Aphasia ◊Comprehension deficits – Unable to analyze precise grammatical information E.g. “The Boy ate the cookie” Who ate the Cookie? “Boy ate cookie” Implied grammar (cookies don’t eat boys) “The Boy was kicked by the girl” Who kicked whom? “Boy kick girl” Paul Broca
  30. 30. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Wernicke’s Aphasia ◊Carl Wernicke, 1870s – Examined two patients Problems understanding language following strokes Fluent but nonsensical speech Poor language comprehension Proximity to auditory sensory areas (Wernicke proposed word memory area) Carl Wernicke
  31. 31. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Wernicke’s Aphasia ◊Production deficits – Sounds fluent (e.g., foreign language) – Neologistic (invented words) – Semantic substitutions E.g. I called my mother on the television and did not understand the romers by the door. Carl Wernicke
  32. 32. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Wernicke’s Aphasia ◊Comprehension deficits – Do not recognize the incomprehensibility of their own sentences – Do not comprehend written or spoken language ◊“Here and gone again” – Aphasia improves over time – Anomia: Losing the ability to retrieve words (nouns) Carl Wernicke
  33. 33. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Classical localization model (Lichtheim, 1885; Geschwand, 1967) Conceptual Information Wernicke’sBroca’s
  34. 34. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Classical localization model (Lichtheim, 1885; Geschwand, 1967) ◊Damage to main areas – Broca’s Aphasia – Wernicke’s Aphasia ◊Damage to connections – Conduction aphasia – Transcortical sensory aphasia
  35. 35. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Conduction aphasia ◊Damage to the connection between Wernicke’s and Broca’s area – Arcuate Fasciculus
  36. 36. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Conduction aphasia ◊Production deficits – Problems producing spontaneous speech – Problem repeating speech – Sometimes use words incorrectly ◊Comprehension – Can understand spoken/written words – Can hear their own speech errors, but cannot correct them
  37. 37. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » Conduction aphasia Conceptual Information Wernicke’sBroca’s
  38. 38. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » A prediction Conceptual Information Wernicke’sBroca’s
  39. 39. Brain & Language • Neuropsychology of language » A prediction ◊ Disconnecting Wernicke’s from the conceptual area should lead to repetition without comprehension. ◊Transcortical Sensory Aphasi – Damage to the angular gyri
  40. 40. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain » ERP studies ◊The N400: Semantic violations
  41. 41. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain » ERP studies ◊The P600: Syntactic Positive Shift (syntactic violation)
  42. 42. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain ◊Dispreferred continuation of ambiguous sentences – E.g., The spy saw the cop with the binoculars Who has the binoculars? “The spy has the binoculars” -> preferred continuation ◊The N400 and aphasia – Swaab et al. Patients listened to sentences that had an anomalous word at the end.
  43. 43. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain ◊Swaab et al. (1997)
  44. 44. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain ◊A caveat: Individual differences – Stimulation mapping of the brain Neurosurgery around left hemisphere language areas – A couple hundred of partients – Correlation with effects in Wernicke and Broca’s area are week Some patients have naming problems in the area, not all. – Anatomical localizations vary considerably.
  45. 45. Brain & Language • Neurophysiology of language in the intact brain ◊A caveat: Individual differences
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