Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Cognitive Neuropsychology WELCOME TO THE COURSE

953
views

Published on

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
953
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Thanks to QAA we have to state our aims & objectives…
    I’m very happy to be interupted - this is a small group so it should be a bit less formal. If it turns out that I can’t get through the material you’ll have to go back to asking questions at the end.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Cognitive Neuropsychology WELCOME TO THE COURSE • Some useful info • Outline course structure / content • Sort out seminar groups / times • Make a start on the material
    • 2. Cognitive Neuropsychology Useful Info • Lecturers: Sam Hutton & Brendan Weekes • Contact info: samh@sussex, b.s.weekes@sussex • My office is JMS 5D15- office hours Monday 10:30- 12:00 • Course Website: www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/teaching/C8517/ PLEASE CHECK THIS SITE REGULARLY • Course structure: 2 Lectures a week . 1 Seminar (two hours) in weeks 2,4,6 and 8.
    • 3. Date Title Lec Date Title Lec 1 04/10 Introductory lecture SH 6 08/11 Amnesia SH 07/10 Neuroanatomy / Clinical Neuropsych SH 11/11 Memory Distortions SH 2 11/10 Neuropsychological Assessment SH 7 15/11 Aphasia BW 14/10 Assumptions of Cog Neuropsych SH 18/11 Dyslexia BW 3 18/10 Methods in Cog Neuropsych SH 8 22/11 Dysgraphia BW 21/10 Agnosia BW 25/11 Anomia BW 4 25/10 Prosopagnosia BW 9 29/11 Differential Diagnosis BW 28/10 Apraxia BW 02/12 Brain Imaging BW 5 01/11 Neglect SH 1 0 06/12 Cognitive Neuropsychiatry S&B 04/11 Executive Dysfunction SH 09/12 Revision / Catch-up SH TIMETABLE
    • 4. Cognitive Neuropsychology Reading Background: Listen to the 2003 Reith Lectures www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/reith2003 Course Textbook: Rapp, B (2000): The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology Other useful books: Parkin, AJ (1998) Explorations in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Ellis & Young (1996) Human Cognitive Neuropsychology. In the final year you must read beyond the textbook – use it as an introduction to other primary sources (e.g. journal articles) not as a substitute.
    • 5. Cognitive Neuropsychology What is it? Cognitive Psychology: The study of the mental processes used in everyday life. Based on an analogy between the mind and the digital computer -the information processing approach. Assumptions: • Cognition can be understood by analysing it in terms of a series of (mainly) sequential stages • During these stages information (representations / symbols) is acted upon by processes • This takes time (so predictions about RT can be made) • The mind is a limited capacity processor.
    • 6. Cognitive Neuropsychology What is it? Cognitive Psychology: The study of the mental processes used in everyday life. Based on an analogy between the mind and the digital computer -the information processing approach. Key Questions • What are the stages through which information is processed? • In what form is information represented in the human mind?
    • 7. Cognitive Neuropsychology What is it? Neuropsychology: The study of the relationship between brain and behaviour. A (very) brief history: •Extension of “localisationist” approach to human sciences that began in the Renaissance. •Phrenology was one early result… (Spurzheim / Gall) •Golden age of Neuropsychology 1860-1905: Broca; Wernicke etc •Rise of both behaviourism and psychoanalytical approach led to decline – ideas of equipotentiality and mass-action dominant until 1950’s •Neuropsychology re-emerged as a more well defined “discipline” in the 1980s.
    • 8. Cognitive Neuropsychology What is it? Neuropsychology: The study of the relationship between brain and behaviour. This definition is very broad – includes psychopharmacology, behavioural genetics, “non-cognitive” behaviour (feeding / locomotion etc) So definition is usually restricted to concern studies that examine the effects of brain damage on behaviour. “Neuropsychology is cognitive to the extent that it purports to clarify the mechanisms of cognitiev function such as thinking, reading, writing, speaking, recognising or remembering, using evidence from neuropathology” Campbell, 1987. Cognitive Neuropsychology can be thought of as a subdiscipline of Cognitive Psychology
    • 9. Relation to other disciplines What is it? • Cognitive Science – Develops computational models of cognition (often to simulate the results of experiments) • Experimental Cognitive Psychology – Empirical, behavioural data from controlled studies using healthy participants • Cognitive Neuropsychology – Studes of brain damaged patients to inform models of healthy cognition • Cognitive Neuropsychiatry – Studies of specific symptoms in patients with psychiatric / neurological disorders • Cognitive Neuroscience – Neural basis of behaviour in animals – often maps neural activity onto function • Behavioural Neurology – Uses data concerning anatomy and physiology of CNS to guide interpretations of disordered behaviour due to neural damage.
    • 10. Cognitive Neuropsychology vs Clinical Neuropsychology Both disciplines are intimately linked, but differ significantly in emphasis. Both focus on the effects of brain damage on psychological processes: Aims of Clinical Neuropsychology are: • Determine Pathology • Characterise Deficit • Establish baseline levels of performance Aims of Cognitive Neuropsychology are: • understand effects of brain damage in terms of disruptions to a model of healthy cognitive function • Use information from patients with brain damage to constrain models of healthy cognitive function.
    • 11. Cognitive Neuropsychology “In any well made machine one is ignorant of the working of most of the parts – the better they work, the less we are conscious of them… it is only a fault which draws attention to the mechanism at all” Craik, 1943 Cognitive Neuropsychology rests on a number of important assumptions about the relationship between brain and behaviour
    • 12. What can we conclude about how the printer works from this output?