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Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit
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Cloud Computing and Managed Services - 2013 NEO Tech Summit

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This presentation is on the importance of cloud computing and managed services. It's one of 6 PowerPoints designed and formatted for DRS's 2013 Northeast Ohio Tech Summit.

This presentation is on the importance of cloud computing and managed services. It's one of 6 PowerPoints designed and formatted for DRS's 2013 Northeast Ohio Tech Summit.

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  • It’s tough to define the cloud with a single definition.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • ?
  • ?
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a way of delivering Cloud Computing infrastructure – servers, storage, network and operating systems – as an on-demand service. Rather than purchasing servers, software, datacenter space or network equipment, clients instead buy those resources as a fully outsourced service on demand.

    Generally IaaS can be obtained as public or private infrastructure or a combination of the two. “Public Cloud” is considered infrastructure that consists of shared resources, deployed on a self-service basis over the Internet.
    By contrast, “Private Cloud” is infrastructure that emulates some of Cloud Computing features, like virtualization, but does so on a private network. Additionally, some hosting providers are beginning to offer a combination of traditional dedicated hosting alongside Public and/or Private Cloud networks. This combination approach is generally called “Hybrid Cloud.”
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a way of delivering Cloud Computing infrastructure – servers, storage, network and operating systems – as an on-demand service. Rather than purchasing servers, software, datacenter space or network equipment, clients instead buy those resources as a fully outsourced service on demand.

    Generally IaaS can be obtained as public or private infrastructure or a combination of the two. “Public Cloud” is considered infrastructure that consists of shared resources, deployed on a self-service basis over the Internet.
    By contrast, “Private Cloud” is infrastructure that emulates some of Cloud Computing features, like virtualization, but does so on a private network. Additionally, some hosting providers are beginning to offer a combination of traditional dedicated hosting alongside Public and/or Private Cloud networks. This combination approach is generally called “Hybrid Cloud.”
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a way of delivering Cloud Computing infrastructure – servers, storage, network and operating systems – as an on-demand service. Rather than purchasing servers, software, datacenter space or network equipment, clients instead buy those resources as a fully outsourced service on demand.

    Generally IaaS can be obtained as public or private infrastructure or a combination of the two. “Public Cloud” is considered infrastructure that consists of shared resources, deployed on a self-service basis over the Internet.
    By contrast, “Private Cloud” is infrastructure that emulates some of Cloud Computing features, like virtualization, but does so on a private network. Additionally, some hosting providers are beginning to offer a combination of traditional dedicated hosting alongside Public and/or Private Cloud networks. This combination approach is generally called “Hybrid Cloud.”
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • Platform as a Service
    Platform as a Service (PaaS) brings the benefits that SaaS bought for applications, but over to the software development world. PaaS can be defined as a computing platform that allows the creation of web applications quickly and easily and without the complexity of buying and maintaining the software and infrastructure underneath it.
    PaaS is analogous to SaaS except that, rather than being software delivered over the web, it is a platform for the creation of software, delivered over the web.
    Characteristics of PaaS
    There are a number of different takes on what constitutes PaaS but some basic characteristics include,16
    Services to develop, test, deploy, host and maintain applications in the • same integrated development environment. All the varying services needed to fulfill the application development process.
    Web based user interface creation tools help to create, modify, test and • deploy different UI scenarios.
    Multi-tenant architecture where multiple concurrent users utilize the same • development application.
    Built in scalability of deployed software including load balancing and • failover.
    Integration with web services and databases via common standards.•
    Support for development team collaboration – some PaaS solutions include • project planning and communication tools.
    Tools to handle billing and subscription management.•
    PaaS, which is similar in many ways to Infrastructure as a Service, which will be discussed below, is differentiated from IaaS by the addition of value added services and comes in two distinct flavours:
    A collaborative platform for software development, focused on workflow 1. management regardless of the data source being used for the application. An example of this approach would be Heroku, a PaaS that utilizes the Ruby on Rails development language.
    A platform that allows for the creation of software utilizing proprietary 2. data from an application. This sort of PaaS can be seen as a method to create applications with a common data form or type. An example of this sort of platform would be the Force.com PaaS from Salesforce.com which is used almost exclusively to develop applications that work with the Salesforce.com CRM.
  • Where PaaS Makes Sense
    PaaS is especially useful in any situation where multiple developers will be working on a development project or where other external parties need to interact with the development process. As the case study below illustrates, it is proving invaluable for those who have an existing data source – for example sales information from a customer relationship management tool – and want to create applications which leverage that data. Finally PaaS is useful where developers wish to automate testing and deployment services.
    The popularity of agile software development, a group of software development methodologies based on iterative and incremental development, will also increase the uptake of PaaS as it eases the difficulties around rapid development and iteration of software.
    Some examples of PaaS include Google App Engine,17 Microsoft Azure Services,18 and the Force.com19 platform.
    Where PaaS May Not be the Best Option
    We contend that PaaS will become the predominant approach towards software development. The ability to automate processes, use pre-defined components and building blocks and deploy automatically to production will provide sufficient value to be highly persuasive. That said, there are certain situations where PaaS may not be ideal, examples include:
    Where the application needs to be highly portable in terms of where it is hosted. Where proprietary languages or approaches would impact on the development process
    Where a proprietary language would hinder later moves to another • provider – concerns are raised about vendor lock-in20
    Where application performance requires customization of the underlying • hardware and software
  • Where PaaS Makes Sense
    PaaS is especially useful in any situation where multiple developers will be working on a development project or where other external parties need to interact with the development process. As the case study below illustrates, it is proving invaluable for those who have an existing data source – for example sales information from a customer relationship management tool – and want to create applications which leverage that data. Finally PaaS is useful where developers wish to automate testing and deployment services.
    The popularity of agile software development, a group of software development methodologies based on iterative and incremental development, will also increase the uptake of PaaS as it eases the difficulties around rapid development and iteration of software.
    Some examples of PaaS include Google App Engine,17 Microsoft Azure Services,18 and the Force.com19 platform.
    Where PaaS May Not be the Best Option
    We contend that PaaS will become the predominant approach towards software development. The ability to automate processes, use pre-defined components and building blocks and deploy automatically to production will provide sufficient value to be highly persuasive. That said, there are certain situations where PaaS may not be ideal, examples include:
    Where the application needs to be highly portable in terms of where it is hosted. Where proprietary languages or approaches would impact on the development process
    Where a proprietary language would hinder later moves to another • provider – concerns are raised about vendor lock-in20
    Where application performance requires customization of the underlying • hardware and software
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • Software as a Service
    Software as a Service (SaaS) is defined as:8
    “…software that is deployed over the internet… With SaaS, a provider licenses an application to customers either as a service on demand, through a subscription, in a “pay-as-you-go” model, or (increasingly) at no charge when there is opportunity to generate revenue from streams other than the user, such as from advertisement or user list sales. ”
    SaaS is a rapidly growing market as indicated in recent reports that predict ongoing double digit growth.9 This rapid growth indicates that SaaS will soon become commonplace within every organization and hence it is important that buyers and users of technology understand what SaaS is and where it is suitable.
    Characteristics of SaaS
    Like other forms of Cloud Computing, it is important to ensure that solutions sold as SaaS in fact comply with generally accepted definitions of Cloud Computing. Some defining characteristics of SaaS include:
    Web access to commercial software.•
    Software is managed from a central location.•
    Software delivered in a “one to many” model.•
    Users not required to handle software upgrades and patches.•
    Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) allow for integration between • different pieces of software.
  • Where SaaS Makes Sense
    Cloud Computing generally, and SaaS in particular, is a rapidly growing method of delivering technology. That said, organizations considering a move to the Cloud will want to consider which applications they move to SaaS. As such there are particular solutions we consider prime candidate for an initial move to SaaS:
    “Vanilla” offerings where the solution is largely undifferentiated. A good • example of a vanilla offering would include email where many times cocompetitive advantage.
    Applications where there is significant interplay between the organization • and the outside world. For example, email newsletter campaign software.
    Applications that have a significant need for web or mobile access. An • example would be mobile sales management software.
    Software that is only to be used for a short term need. An example would • be collaboration software for a specific project.
    Software where demand spikes significantly, for example tax or billing • software used once a month.
    SaaS is widely accepted to have been introduced to the business world by the Salesforce10 Customer Relationship Management (CRM) product. As one of the earliest entrants it is not surprising that CRM is the most popular SaaS application area,11 however e-mail, financial management, customer service and expense management have also gotten good uptake via SaaS.
    Where SaaS May Not be the Best Option
    While SaaS is a very valuable tool, there are certain situations where we believe it is not the best option for software delivery. Examples where SaaS may not be appropriate include:
    Applications where extremely fast processing of real time data is required.•
    Applications where legislation or other regulation does not permit data • being hosted externally.
    Applications where an existing on-premise solution fulfills all of the • organization’s needs.
    Software as a Service may be the best known aspect of Cloud Computing, but developers and organizations all around the world are leveraging Platform as a Service, which mixes the simplicity of SaaS with the power of IaaS, to great effect.mpetitors use the same software precisely because this fundamental technology is a requirement for doing business, but does not itself confer a
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is the delivery of a compute foundation (servers, networking technology, storage, and data center space) as a service. It also includes the delivery of operating systems and virtualization technology to manage the resources.
  • Need content
  • How does Cloud Computing Generate Cost Savings
  • Gartner estimates that IT maintenance accounts for 80% of total IT expendit

    The 80/20 rule applies to time, just as it applies to money. The IT organization is spending 80% of it’s supporting core tech, operating systems, servers and the data center.
  • The 80-20 rule is often used within organizations to illustrate the large effects that small variables can have. Rather than an absolute measure, it tends to be a generalization that is intended to make a point about distribution curves. The most well known use of the rule is the sales 80-20 rule which says that 80% of revenue for a business is derived from 20% of customers.
    Information Technology has its own series of 80-20 rules.
  • Cut?
  • Gartner estimates that IT maintenance accounts for 80% of total IT expenditures

    The 80/20 rule applies to time, just as it applies to money. The IT organization is spending 80% of it’s supporting core tech, operating systems, servers and the data center.

    So how do free up the time of the IT staff to focus on applications and areas that create value for the organization instead of spending 80% of their time supporting it infrastructure?
  • Simple illustration I made quickly. Changes?
  • We Build Strong Networks, 
Relationships and Trust with 
Our Customers, Employees 
    and Business Partners.

    Our shared values
    Strong Networks
    Whether it is a network of servers or a network of employees and partners working as a team, we 
understand that a network is 
    stronger than any individual. We know that the integrity of these networks hinge on the strength of each individual member. We 
    realize that strong networks are the foundation for building trust leading to strong relationships.

    Strong Relationships 
    We value equally relationships with our co-workers, customers, vendors and business partners which we believe will enable us to develop better projects, products, and a wider breadth of services while maintaining an enthusiastic work environment.

    Strong Trust 
    We work together to create a culture of inclusion built on trust, respect and dignity for all.
    Strong Company
    We recognize that profitability 
is essential to building strong 
    networks, relationships, and trust.
  • Transcript

    • 1. We Build Strong Networks, Relationships and Trust. Cloud Services and Managed Services Solutions
    • 2. The cloud is the next step in the evolution of the Internet The cloud is the fifth generation of computing (after mainframe, personal computer, client-server computing and the web) Gartner – A style of computing in which scalable and elastic IT- enabled capabilities are delivered as a service using Internet technologies. Cloud Computing – What is it?
    • 3. The ability to dynamically expand or compress processing power and storage – and affect charges in a utility billing manner. Elastic Computing The cost related to the next-best choice available to someone who has picked among several mutually exclusive choices. Opportunity Cost The practice of outsourcing day-to-day management responsibilities as a strategic method for improving operations. Managed Services Cloud Computing – Some Terminology
    • 4. Cloud Computing – How Big Is It?
    • 5. From the customer perspective….. One word – economics Faster, simpler, cheaper to use cloud apps No upfront capital required for servers and storage No ongoing operational expenses for running a data center Applications can be accessed from anywhere, anytime What’s Driving Cloud Computing?
    • 6. Infrastructure as a Service IaaS Platform as a Service PaaS Software as a Service SaaS Business Process as a Service BPaaS Hardware as a Service HaaS The Cloud Computing Stack
    • 7. Breaking Down the Big Numbers
    • 8. Breaking Down the Big Numbers
    • 9. Infrastructure as a Service IaaS Platform as a Service PaaS Software as a Service SaaS Business Process as a Service BPaaS Hardware as a Service HaaS The Cloud Computing Stack
    • 10. Delivered as public cloud, private cloud or hybrid cloud Resources are distributed as a service Variable cost – utility pricing model Enables scaling flexibility Resources are typically shared between users Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
    • 11.  Capital to invest is low  Pressure is applied to move to OpEx cost model  Very rapid growth or highly variable demand  Predictable cost of expanding services required A good fit when… ☒ Regulatory compliance restricts offshore data storage ☒ PCI or similar compliance can be problematic ☒ Highest levels of performance is required Not a good fit when… Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
    • 12. Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) 201 0 201 1 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 GAGR (%) 2011-2016 Compute 2.19 3.37 4.89 7.20 10.51 14.78 19.89 42.6 Print 0.05 0.07 0.10 0.13 0.18 0.23 0.29 31.5 Storage 0.64 0.86 1.13 1.68 2.35 3.13 4.04 36.4 Cloud System Infrastructure (IaaS) Total 2.88 4.30 6.12 9.02 13.03 18.14 24.22 41.3
    • 13. Infrastructure as a Service IaaS Platform as a Service PaaS Software as a Service SaaS Business Process as a Service BPaaS Hardware as a Service HaaS The Cloud Computing Stack
    • 14. Two Flavors – Collaborative platform for software development & creation of software using existing applications – Salesforce.com add-on apps Services to develop, test, deploy, host, and maintain applications in the same development environment Multi-tenant architecture for multiple users in the same development environment Web-based user interface creation tools to create, modify, test and deploy UI scenarios. Platform as a Service (PaaS)
    • 15. Platform as a Service (PaaS)  Multiple developers working on the same development project  External parties need to interact with the development process  Developing add on apps to existing environments like Salesforce.com A good fit when… ☒ Regulatory compliance restricts offshore data storage ☒ PCI or similar compliance can be problematic ☒ Highest levels of performance is required Not a good fit when…
    • 16. Platform as a Service (PaaS) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 GAGR (%) 2011-2016 Application Development 0.14 0.21 0.27 0.34 0.42 0.5 0.58 22.4 App Infrastructure & Middleware 0.43 0.65 0.87 1.14 1.46 1.82 2.23 28.0 Business Intelligence Platform 0.01 0.03 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.11 0.13 38.8 Database Management Systems 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.06 0.09 0.12 48.5 Cloud App Infrastructure Services (SaaS) Total 0.60 0.90 1.21 1.58 2.02 2.51 3.06 27.7
    • 17. Infrastructure as a Service IaaS Platform as a Service PaaS Software as a Service SaaS Business Process as a Service BPaaS Hardware as a Service HaaS The Cloud Computing Stack
    • 18. Web access to commercial software Software is managed from a central location Software delivered in a “One to Many Model” Users not required to handle software upgrades and patches API’s allow for integration between different pieces of software Software as a Service (SaaS)
    • 19. Software as a Service (SaaS)  Applications have a significant need for web or mobile access  Vanilla applications that offer capabilities to a group of business users, i.e. IT vendor partners  Applications where there is considerable Interaction between the organization A good fit when… ☒ Applications that require fast processing of real time data ☒ Applications with PCI or similar compliance requirements ☒ The application has an existing on premise solution Not a good fit when…
    • 20. SaaS 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 GAGR (%) 2011-2016 Business Intelligence Apps 0.14 0.22 0329 0.37 0.48 0.59 0.73 27.4 CRM 3.39 4.21 5.03 5.92 6.87 7.88 8.96 16.3 Digital Content Creation 0.10 0.22 0.27 0.37 0.48 0.71 0.93 34.0 Enterprise Content Management 0.20 0.26 0.37 0.51 0.62 0.72 0.82 25.9 ERP 1.50 1.97 2.51 3.18 3.95 4.47 5.65 23.4 Office Suites 0.11 0.23 0.41 0.73 1.11 1.39 1.72 49.1 Other App Software 2.32 2.81 3.27 3.91 4.55 5.41 6.54 18.4 Project & Portfolio Management 0.15 0.25 0.31 0.42 0.54 0.62 0.68 22.2 Supply Chain Management 1.02 1.27 1.54 1.93 2.34 2.82 3.36 21.5 Web Conferencing, Teaming Platforms, and Social Software Suites 1.82 2.03 2.23 2.48 2.76 3.07 3.4 10.9 Cloud Application Services Total 10.75 13.46 16.22 19.82 23.72 27.94 32.80 19.5
    • 21. Infrastructure as a Service IaaS Platform as a Service PaaS Software as a Service SaaS Business Process as a Service BPaaS Hardware as a Service HaaS The Cloud Computing Stack
    • 22. 76% of entire cloud forecast is in this segment Enables organizations to easily keep up with complex administrative issues (payroll) Pricing models are consumption based or subscription based Sits on top of the other three cloud service types Services are accessed via internet Gives enterprises greater agility in responding to changing market conditions Business Process as a Service (BPaaS)
    • 23. Business Process as a Service (BPaaS)
    • 24. Business Process as a Service (BPaaS)  Moving to a service oriented approach is desirable  Many locations require a consistent process  Changing business requirements require expensive software upgrades A good fit when… ☒ Existing integrated software solutions adequately supporting the task ☒ Low transaction count in a subscription-based service ☒ Reliable access to the Internet is a problem Not a good fit when…
    • 25. BPaaS 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 GAGR (%) 2011- 2016 Cloud Payments 4.41 4.86 5.22 5.84 6.70 7.75 8.88 12.8 Customer Management 2.16 2.33 2.60 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.25 12.8 E-Commerce Enablement 4.33 4.80 5.49 6.52 7.33 8.24 9.07 13.6 Finance and Accounting 1.19 1.29 1.39 1.54 1.72 1.93 2.16 1.09 HR 10.20 10.66 10.87 11.79 12.82 13.77 14.71 6.7 Industry Operation 2.05 2.21 2.50 3.02 3.51 3.90 4.39 14.7 Supply Management 2.45 2.70 2.85 3.25 3.68 4.06 4.42 10.4 Cloud Based Process Services (BPaas) Total 26.79 28.84 30.93 34.97 39.17 43.47 47.8 9 10.7
    • 26. Cost Savings
    • 27. Lowering the opportunity cost of running technology Allowing a shift from capital expenditure to operating expenditure By lowering the total cost of ownership (TCO) of technology Enabling the organization to add business value by renewed focus on business activities Cloud Computing Cost Savings
    • 28. IT Has It’s Own 80-20 Rule
    • 29. Time is Money Focus on what matters. Maintaining the status quo Roughly 80% of IT time and expenditure is used on processes that don’t create any value for the organization. The opportunity cost The opportunity cost Is the benefit that can accrue to the organization from better utilization of that 80%. Drive efficiency From 20% to 80%. Lowering the Opportunity Cost
    • 30. CapEx to OpEx Shift Operating expenses are fully deducted in the accounting period in which they are incurred Shifting to OpEx generally lowers tax bills OpEx costs can be terminated as situations change CapEx approval process can be quite lengthy OpEx model helps companies gain expense certainity
    • 31. Example Year 3 TCO •Hardware 26% •Software 11% •HW/SW Maintenance 20% •Admin & Operations 29% •Power Cooling & Space 13% Sample 3 Year TCO for Storage Hardware and Software 37% of TCO Most equipment upgrades, especially servers and storage are now eliminated
    • 32. Cloud computing enables organizations to focus on their core business Flip the 80/20 rule results in favor of 80% concentration on applications Capital expenditure budgets are freed up for core business needs Renewed Focus on Business Activities
    • 33. XYZ Company 100 Employees Service Oriented Business That Includes Product Sales - Growth Flat Last Two Years Current IT Infrastructure is at HQ Location Current Servers and Storage – 4 Years Old ERP Systems Supported In House Web Site/Sales Order Entry System Needs Major Mods to Gain a Competitive Advantage In House IT Staff Capable – Yet Bogged Down in Support of Infrastructure XYZ Company - Cloud Migration Example
    • 34.  1 Web Server  2 Exchange Servers  2 ERP Servers MS Dynamics  1 ERP Development Server  2 SQL Database Servers for Operational Applications  1 MS File Server  1 Backup Server – Weekly Tapes to Iron Mtn.  SAN Storage with 2 TB Capacity  Cisco VoIP Phone System VMware-based Infrastructure with: XYZ’s Current IT Infrastructure
    • 35.  1 Web Server IaaS  2 Exchange Servers IaaS  2 ERP Servers – MS Dynamics IaaS  1 ERP Development Server PaaS  2 SQL Database Servers IaaS  1 MS File Server IaaS  1 Backup Server IaaS  SAN Storage with 2 TB Capacity IaaS  Cisco VoIP Phone System VMware-based Infrastructure with: XYZ’s Infrastructure – Cloud Migration
    • 36. XYZ Company’s Own 80-20 Rule
    • 37. Cloud Computing – Managed Services Cloud computing Managed Services Cloud computing only gets you ½ way there!
    • 38. XYZ’s IaaS & PaaS Cloud Savings Lowered Electricity Costs for Servers and Cooling Hardware Firmware Patching Eliminated Future Server and Storage Upgrade Costs Avoided BUT – the IT Staff still had to perform all other support Backup Support, Server Patching, etc., etc. Efficiency Potential Not Fully Realized Work on web site /sales order entry system slow That’s where Managed Services can help.
    • 39. Managed Services The practice of outsourcing day-to-day management responsibilities as a strategic method for improving operations. Managed Services Definition
    • 40. Server Management & Support with O/S Patching MS Exchange Management and Support Storage Management & Support Network Device Management & Support 24x7 Device Monitoring and Support Anti-Spam and Anti-Virus Management Backup Management & Support End User Help Desk Support Cisco IP Phone System Management & Support Managed Services – What’s Included
    • 41. Managed Services - Benefits Control IT costs Redirect IT’s efforts towards providing competitive advantage Control labor costs Quickly implement new technology Stay focused on your core business Increase efficiency and competitiveness Level playing field with larger competitors
    • 42. DRS Overview
    • 43. Who is DRS?
    • 44. Managed Services Professional Services Cloud Computing Collaboration Support Desk Building and Metro Cabling Connectivity and Internet Solutions Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery and Backup Application Development Colocation and Data Center IT Consulting Solution Implementation Services include: DRS (Data Recovery Services)
    • 45. DRS has over 36,000 sq. ft. of Data Center space with locked cabinets, cages and technical office suites for enhanced security. Our Data Centers are all Tier 3 facilities. Belmont Technology Complex Features: • Dual Bus Power System • Redundant HVAC • SAS 70 • Rack Space • 21,000 sq. ft. • Office Suites Avalable WeConnect Data Center Features: • 16,000 sq. ft. • Cage and Rack Space • Disaster Recovery Planning • Dedicated Electrical Room • Dedicated Battery Room • Fiber Connectivity Youngstown Data Center Features: • AC & DC Protected Power • Carrier Class Data Center • Cage and Rack Space • SAS 70 • 16,000 sq. ft. Pittsburgh Location Features: • AC & DC Protected Power • Centrally Located • Cage and Rack Space • Dedicated Standby Power Colocation Facilities
    • 46. DRS has developed the technical expertise and IT solutions to help customers increase their productivity while decreasing their costs. DRS employees are dedicated to making sure they have the latest and greatest certifications and continuing education available. The staff has achieved more than 50 of specialized certifications and the company as a whole has earned high-ranking partnership status with major IT vendors. Partners and Certifications
    • 47. Contact Info Speaker: Mike McHugh Director of Sales and Marketing Formatted: Dom Cascarelli Marketing & Media Associate Presentation: Youngstown Office: 1343 Belmont Avenue Youngstown, Ohio 44504 Local Phone #: 330-259-4900 DRS Corporate Headquarters
    • 48. Thank You! Please complete the survey at the end of your track and you will receive a USB flash drive that contains all of today’s presentations.

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