Effective Social Media for Your Parish or Ministry
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Effective Social Media for Your Parish or Ministry

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A New Media Forum at the Archdiocese of Boston on February 8, 2012, presented by Pilot New Media, part of the Pilot Meda Group of the Archdiocese of Boston.

A New Media Forum at the Archdiocese of Boston on February 8, 2012, presented by Pilot New Media, part of the Pilot Meda Group of the Archdiocese of Boston.

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  • Your website is a destination. You need gateways to bring people to you first.\n
  • Your website is a destination. You need gateways to bring people to you first.\n
  • Your website is a destination. You need gateways to bring people to you first.\n
  • Your website is a destination. You need gateways to bring people to you first.\n
  • It is not enough to have a church building and expect people to show up. Yes, it happens, but that’s not how the Apostles evangelized the ancient world. It’s not how we’ll re-evangelize the 21st century.\n
  • The modern Aeropagus is social media.\n
  • The modern Aeropagus is social media.\n
  • The modern Aeropagus is social media.\n
  • The modern Aeropagus is social media.\n
  • It’s about relationships. Meaningful relationships. It's not enough to build up a large number of followers. What's important is to create relationships, to engage people, to create a dialogue.\n
  • It’s about relationships. Meaningful relationships. It's not enough to build up a large number of followers. What's important is to create relationships, to engage people, to create a dialogue.\n
  • It’s about relationships. Meaningful relationships. It's not enough to build up a large number of followers. What's important is to create relationships, to engage people, to create a dialogue.\n
  • It’s about relationships. Meaningful relationships. It's not enough to build up a large number of followers. What's important is to create relationships, to engage people, to create a dialogue.\n
  • It’s about relationships. Meaningful relationships. It's not enough to build up a large number of followers. What's important is to create relationships, to engage people, to create a dialogue.\n
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  • Not every priest needs to be on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Some may be concerned about being compromised in today’s climate, butw hen setup and used properly, a social media account does not present any significant danger to a priest or pastoral associate. You can keep your private life private and also maintain a public profile as well. But every parish should be present in social media in order to be where the people are.\n
  • Not every priest needs to be on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Some may be concerned about being compromised in today’s climate, butw hen setup and used properly, a social media account does not present any significant danger to a priest or pastoral associate. You can keep your private life private and also maintain a public profile as well. But every parish should be present in social media in order to be where the people are.\n
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  • You’re busy. You have a full plate. You’re making do with less. How do you find the time to manage yet another project?\n\nWe’ll get more in-depth on this in a little but, but simply there are many tools to automate much of what is required; you can spend as little as 5 minutes per day or 30 minutes per week; and you can spread out the workload among trusted volunteer and lay ministers.\n
  • You’re busy. You have a full plate. You’re making do with less. How do you find the time to manage yet another project?\n\nWe’ll get more in-depth on this in a little but, but simply there are many tools to automate much of what is required; you can spend as little as 5 minutes per day or 30 minutes per week; and you can spread out the workload among trusted volunteer and lay ministers.\n
  • You’re busy. You have a full plate. You’re making do with less. How do you find the time to manage yet another project?\n\nWe’ll get more in-depth on this in a little but, but simply there are many tools to automate much of what is required; you can spend as little as 5 minutes per day or 30 minutes per week; and you can spread out the workload among trusted volunteer and lay ministers.\n
  • You’re busy. You have a full plate. You’re making do with less. How do you find the time to manage yet another project?\n\nWe’ll get more in-depth on this in a little but, but simply there are many tools to automate much of what is required; you can spend as little as 5 minutes per day or 30 minutes per week; and you can spread out the workload among trusted volunteer and lay ministers.\n
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  • Let’s get into the nitty-gritty of how to create a Facebook Page for your parish. I understand that some of you already have Facebook pages, so this might be old hat, but you might also pick up a thing or two. Facebook has changed some of the process and some of the ways that Pages work so it might be worthwhile to review.\n
  • Let’s get into the nitty-gritty of how to create a Facebook Page for your parish. I understand that some of you already have Facebook pages, so this might be old hat, but you might also pick up a thing or two. Facebook has changed some of the process and some of the ways that Pages work so it might be worthwhile to review.\n
  • The first step is to understand the three different kinds of ways you can be represented on Facebook.\n\nThere are profiles, pages, and groups\n
  • A profile is an individual, a person, someone with a name. According to Facebook’s terms of service, this must be a real person, not an organization or group. Profiles have friends. You need to have a profile in order to create pages or groups.\n\nA Page is a community, cause, or organization. It is mostly a broadcast medium, from you out to the people who Like your page. People can Like you, but they do so of their own accord, after being invited by others or urged by you in other places, like your parish bulletin. We recommend every Parish have a Page. A person can have both a personal profile in which they friend a select number of people and a Personal Page which their fans can like and receive updates. Pages are visible to everyone on the Internet by default, whereas profiles are not.\n\nA group is for small group communications. It can be open, such that anyone on Facebook can join; closed, so that people have to be invited; or secret, so that only members even know it exists. Group members can add new members without getting permission first, which is somewhat controversial. Anyone can create a group, while pages should be created by official representatives of an entity.\n
  • Step one: You need a Facebook profile. On your Facebook news feed, the default page you see when open Facebook, look on the left for “pages”. Move your cursor over to the right of the word “pages” and the word “more” appears. Click it and this page comes up that lists all your Pages. In the upper-right, click “Create a Page”.\n
  • Step one: You need a Facebook profile. On your Facebook news feed, the default page you see when open Facebook, look on the left for “pages”. Move your cursor over to the right of the word “pages” and the word “more” appears. Click it and this page comes up that lists all your Pages. In the upper-right, click “Create a Page”.\n
  • Step two: You need to categorize your page. You will choose one of these two options as churches can fit in either one. For the Archdiocesan page we choose “company, organization, or institution” but it might be better for parishes to choose “local business or place.” \n\nIn general, this is for places where people can visit your location. It also allows people to “check-in”. More on that later.\n
  • Step two: You need to categorize your page. You will choose one of these two options as churches can fit in either one. For the Archdiocesan page we choose “company, organization, or institution” but it might be better for parishes to choose “local business or place.” \n\nIn general, this is for places where people can visit your location. It also allows people to “check-in”. More on that later.\n
  • Step three: You’ll be asked to choose a sub-category and pick a name. We suggest something distinct and intuitive, like Parish Name and Town. Parish Name alone would leave you subject to confusion: Which of the hundreds of St. Mary’s are you? Choose wisely because you can’t change this later.\n\nYou will also agree to the Facebook Pages terms of service.\n
  • Step three: You’ll be asked to choose a sub-category and pick a name. We suggest something distinct and intuitive, like Parish Name and Town. Parish Name alone would leave you subject to confusion: Which of the hundreds of St. Mary’s are you? Choose wisely because you can’t change this later.\n\nYou will also agree to the Facebook Pages terms of service.\n
  • Step four: Upload an image of your parish. Pilot New Media can provide a professional exterior photo from our archives. We have recent photos of every parish in the archdiocese.\n
  • Step four: Upload an image of your parish. Pilot New Media can provide a professional exterior photo from our archives. We have recent photos of every parish in the archdiocese.\n
  • Step five: Invite your friends. These are YOUR Facebook friends, which is more useful if you have a profile already. There’s also an option to email anyone in your address book about your new page as well.\n\nIt’s good to acquire a good chunk of people who Like your page right away. Once you have 25 people, you can set up a custom short Facebook address to give people, such as www.Facebook.com/BostonCatholic.\n
  • Step five: Invite your friends. These are YOUR Facebook friends, which is more useful if you have a profile already. There’s also an option to email anyone in your address book about your new page as well.\n\nIt’s good to acquire a good chunk of people who Like your page right away. Once you have 25 people, you can set up a custom short Facebook address to give people, such as www.Facebook.com/BostonCatholic.\n
  • Step six: Add your basic information\n
  • Step six: Add your basic information\n
  • Step seven: You now have a Facebook Page! But you’re not done yet. Click on the “Edit Page” button in the top right.\n
  • Step seven: You now have a Facebook Page! But you’re not done yet. Click on the “Edit Page” button in the top right.\n
  • Step eight: These are your basic permissions. You can limit who can post on your wall, what words people can’t use, and so on. At BostonCatholic, we have the profanity blocklist set to medium.\n
  • Step eight: These are your basic permissions. You can limit who can post on your wall, what words people can’t use, and so on. At BostonCatholic, we have the profanity blocklist set to medium.\n
  • Step nine: Under basic information, add your address, your founding date, a description, mission statement, contact information and so on. This is also where you would pick the username for your custom Facebook URL once you have 25 likes.\n
  • Step nine: Under basic information, add your address, your founding date, a description, mission statement, contact information and so on. This is also where you would pick the username for your custom Facebook URL once you have 25 likes.\n
  • Step ten: You will want to make sure that there are at least two admins for your Pages. This prevents you from getting stuck when someone abruptly moves out of the parish, goes on vacation, or decides to hold your page hostage. Two admins is good, three is better. You can also choose whether the identities of the admins is shown on the Page. \n
  • Step ten: You will want to make sure that there are at least two admins for your Pages. This prevents you from getting stuck when someone abruptly moves out of the parish, goes on vacation, or decides to hold your page hostage. Two admins is good, three is better. You can also choose whether the identities of the admins is shown on the Page. \n
  • Step eleven: One of the things Facebook does right is its analytics. Because users put so much information in their profiles, Facebook can tell you a lot about your users and their interaction with your page. Keep in mind that you won’t be able to see some information about how people re-share or re-use your content depending on whether (a) you’re Facebook friends with them and/or (b) whether their posts are public or private.\n
  • Step eleven: One of the things Facebook does right is its analytics. Because users put so much information in their profiles, Facebook can tell you a lot about your users and their interaction with your page. Keep in mind that you won’t be able to see some information about how people re-share or re-use your content depending on whether (a) you’re Facebook friends with them and/or (b) whether their posts are public or private.\n
  • Step eleven: One of the things Facebook does right is its analytics. Because users put so much information in their profiles, Facebook can tell you a lot about your users and their interaction with your page. Keep in mind that you won’t be able to see some information about how people re-share or re-use your content depending on whether (a) you’re Facebook friends with them and/or (b) whether their posts are public or private.\n
  • Here’s an example of great Catholic parish Facebook page from St. Anthony in Fresno, California. There are links to their website, prayer requests from parish members, announcements of ministry schedules, links to news on diocesan websites, and so on.\n
  • Here’s an example of great Catholic parish Facebook page from St. Anthony in Fresno, California. There are links to their website, prayer requests from parish members, announcements of ministry schedules, links to news on diocesan websites, and so on.\n
  • Here’s an example of great Catholic parish Facebook page from St. Anthony in Fresno, California. There are links to their website, prayer requests from parish members, announcements of ministry schedules, links to news on diocesan websites, and so on.\n
  • Here’s an example of great Catholic parish Facebook page from St. Anthony in Fresno, California. There are links to their website, prayer requests from parish members, announcements of ministry schedules, links to news on diocesan websites, and so on.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
  • Here is their parish website. Notice that they have provided prominent links on the page to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a substantial way they communicate with parishioners.\n
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  • St. Anthony, Fresno, has announcements at Mass encouraging parishioners to check-in on the Facebook page. Not only does it drive traffic to the Facebook page, but it’s also a low friction form of evangelization. On Sunday mornings my news feed is full of people checking in at church, showing all of their Facebook friends that, yes, they do go to Mass.\n
  • St. Anthony, Fresno, has announcements at Mass encouraging parishioners to check-in on the Facebook page. Not only does it drive traffic to the Facebook page, but it’s also a low friction form of evangelization. On Sunday mornings my news feed is full of people checking in at church, showing all of their Facebook friends that, yes, they do go to Mass.\n
  • St. Anthony, Fresno, has announcements at Mass encouraging parishioners to check-in on the Facebook page. Not only does it drive traffic to the Facebook page, but it’s also a low friction form of evangelization. On Sunday mornings my news feed is full of people checking in at church, showing all of their Facebook friends that, yes, they do go to Mass.\n
  • St. Anthony, Fresno, has announcements at Mass encouraging parishioners to check-in on the Facebook page. Not only does it drive traffic to the Facebook page, but it’s also a low friction form of evangelization. On Sunday mornings my news feed is full of people checking in at church, showing all of their Facebook friends that, yes, they do go to Mass.\n
  • St. Anthony, Fresno, has announcements at Mass encouraging parishioners to check-in on the Facebook page. Not only does it drive traffic to the Facebook page, but it’s also a low friction form of evangelization. On Sunday mornings my news feed is full of people checking in at church, showing all of their Facebook friends that, yes, they do go to Mass.\n
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  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • Photos and links to content on the web are important on Facebook because Facebook ranks that kind of content higher and will show up more often at the top of people’s news feeds.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
  • If you go to another page on Facebook, say BostonCatholic or the Vatican, near the bottom of the lefthand column you will see a series of links. One will add this Page to YOUR Page’s favorites. Then on your Page you will see a list under the title “Likes”.\n
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  • Twitter can be described as a microblog, a social network, a real-time information network, or a social search engine. In fact, it is all of those things.\n
  • Twitter can be described as a microblog, a social network, a real-time information network, or a social search engine. In fact, it is all of those things.\n
  • Twitter can be described as a microblog, a social network, a real-time information network, or a social search engine. In fact, it is all of those things.\n
  • Twitter can be described as a microblog, a social network, a real-time information network, or a social search engine. In fact, it is all of those things.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Twitter asks the question: “What’s on your mind ... in 140 characters or less?”\n\nWhy 140 characters? Originally it was conceived as something that exclusively would be used via cell phone text messages and those have a technical limitation of 140 characters. The limitation has forced creativity in spelling and abbreviation and even spawned business that exist to shorten URLs and host photos and video for tweets.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s look at some of the jargon specific to Twitter.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • Let’s see how we’d construct a typical tweet. Short and sweet. You might add a hashtag. You might send it publicly to BostonCatholic so that your own followers see it, but BostonCatholic gets a notification. Or if it’s a private message, then direct message it. I can then retweet your public or private message to all my followers.\n
  • So let’s set up a Twitter account. Step one: Go to Twitter.com.\n
  • So let’s set up a Twitter account. Step one: Go to Twitter.com.\n
  • Step two: Enter your parish name, keeping in mind the character limit. Don’t worry too much about this one for now. This is NOT your Twitter username.\n
  • Step two: Enter your parish name, keeping in mind the character limit. Don’t worry too much about this one for now. This is NOT your Twitter username.\n
  • Step three: Confirm your account name (parish name), your email address (you can only have one Twitter account per email address), password (choose a good one!), and the all important Twitter username. This will be your address on Twitter. It should be memorable, distinctive, and easy to remember. And short! Remember, you only have 140 characters and you don’t want people’s retweets and replies to you to consist mainly of your Twitter handle.\n
  • Step three: Confirm your account name (parish name), your email address (you can only have one Twitter account per email address), password (choose a good one!), and the all important Twitter username. This will be your address on Twitter. It should be memorable, distinctive, and easy to remember. And short! Remember, you only have 140 characters and you don’t want people’s retweets and replies to you to consist mainly of your Twitter handle.\n
  • Step four: Twitter will walk you through some basics of the service.\n
  • Step four: Twitter will walk you through some basics of the service.\n
  • Step five: Twitter will ask ask you to follow your first five users. These are a few we recommend. They will recommend some, but they are generic recommendations, probably not suitable for a parish account.\n
  • Step five: Twitter will ask ask you to follow your first five users. These are a few we recommend. They will recommend some, but they are generic recommendations, probably not suitable for a parish account.\n
  • Step six: Twitter will have a number of other steps for you to go through, but you can skip any of them by clicking the well-hidden link at the bottom of the lefthand column. \n
  • Step six: Twitter will have a number of other steps for you to go through, but you can skip any of them by clicking the well-hidden link at the bottom of the lefthand column. \n
  • Step seven: Twitter will send an email to the address you gave them to ensure that you are setting up a legitimate account. Click the link in the email to confirm. If you don’t see it in your inbox within a minute or two, check your Spam mailbox or click resend above. You could now start sending Tweets, but first...\n
  • Step seven: Twitter will send an email to the address you gave them to ensure that you are setting up a legitimate account. Click the link in the email to confirm. If you don’t see it in your inbox within a minute or two, check your Spam mailbox or click resend above. You could now start sending Tweets, but first...\n
  • Step eight: Let’s take a look at your Twitter home page. In the left column, we see some basic information about your account, including a placeholder for your profile image. (More on that in a sec). Below that are some recommendations for whom to follow. This will become better as you follow and are followed by more people. (I’ve had to blank out bits that aren’t suitable for mixed company. This is one of the issues of Twitter we need to be aware of but shouldn’t deter us: It is a decidedly free speech zone and so we will see things we may not want to see. But we don’t have to see them if we set up our profiles right.)\n\nBelow the recommended follows are trending topics on Twitter. These are often hashtags or other terms that are showing up in a lot of tweets right now. (Or if it says “promoted” that someone paid to show up there.) You can changed the list to be more local (i.e. Boston), but I’ll be honest that I don’t find it all that useful.\n
  • Step eight: Let’s take a look at your Twitter home page. In the left column, we see some basic information about your account, including a placeholder for your profile image. (More on that in a sec). Below that are some recommendations for whom to follow. This will become better as you follow and are followed by more people. (I’ve had to blank out bits that aren’t suitable for mixed company. This is one of the issues of Twitter we need to be aware of but shouldn’t deter us: It is a decidedly free speech zone and so we will see things we may not want to see. But we don’t have to see them if we set up our profiles right.)\n\nBelow the recommended follows are trending topics on Twitter. These are often hashtags or other terms that are showing up in a lot of tweets right now. (Or if it says “promoted” that someone paid to show up there.) You can changed the list to be more local (i.e. Boston), but I’ll be honest that I don’t find it all that useful.\n
  • Step nine: Now to customize your profile for your parish. Also note the button at top for composing a new tweet. But for now, select “Settings” from the dropdown menu that shows the profile of a person.\n
  • Step nine: Now to customize your profile for your parish. Also note the button at top for composing a new tweet. But for now, select “Settings” from the dropdown menu that shows the profile of a person.\n
  • Step ten: There are a number of settings options to consider, but we’ll look at only the most important right up front. First, for security’s sake, click the box for “Always use HTTPS”. Without getting too technical, this ensures that all communication between your computer and Twitter are encrypted to prevent people from stealing your password. Then click Save changes.\n
  • Step ten: There are a number of settings options to consider, but we’ll look at only the most important right up front. First, for security’s sake, click the box for “Always use HTTPS”. Without getting too technical, this ensures that all communication between your computer and Twitter are encrypted to prevent people from stealing your password. Then click Save changes.\n
  • Step eleven: Give your profile a new picture. A photo of your church, like the one on your Facebook page would be good. You have to make sure that it’s the right size and type. If you need assistance on this --or with anything here--please feel free to contact me.\n\nWe encourage you to fill in the other profile information. \n\nAlso note at the bottom the option to automatically post your Tweets to Facebook. That’s a more advanced function we will cover in a later Forum, but there’s a similar function on Facebook as well as third-party options. Suffice to say, the key here is to ensure that you posts the tweets to your Facebook Page and not your personal Facebook profile. As always “Save changes”.\n
  • Step eleven: Give your profile a new picture. A photo of your church, like the one on your Facebook page would be good. You have to make sure that it’s the right size and type. If you need assistance on this --or with anything here--please feel free to contact me.\n\nWe encourage you to fill in the other profile information. \n\nAlso note at the bottom the option to automatically post your Tweets to Facebook. That’s a more advanced function we will cover in a later Forum, but there’s a similar function on Facebook as well as third-party options. Suffice to say, the key here is to ensure that you posts the tweets to your Facebook Page and not your personal Facebook profile. As always “Save changes”.\n
  • Step eleven: Give your profile a new picture. A photo of your church, like the one on your Facebook page would be good. You have to make sure that it’s the right size and type. If you need assistance on this --or with anything here--please feel free to contact me.\n\nWe encourage you to fill in the other profile information. \n\nAlso note at the bottom the option to automatically post your Tweets to Facebook. That’s a more advanced function we will cover in a later Forum, but there’s a similar function on Facebook as well as third-party options. Suffice to say, the key here is to ensure that you posts the tweets to your Facebook Page and not your personal Facebook profile. As always “Save changes”.\n
  • This is the Archdiocesan Twitter page. The information on the left is actually part of an image. Twitter allows you to design your own background image. You also see a retweet in the middle from BUCatholic.\n
  • This is the Archdiocesan Twitter page. The information on the left is actually part of an image. Twitter allows you to design your own background image. You also see a retweet in the middle from BUCatholic.\n
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  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
  • Event-based tweeting can be live tweeting so that others not present can follow along or to allow participants to tweet with one another during the event. (Hopefully, not the mission.) A hashtag would be ideal here.\n
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  • Step one: You need a Google account. If you don’t have a Gmail account, you can sign up for one here. Otherwise just sign in at plus.google.com. As with Facebook, you need to setup a personal profile before you can setup a parish Page.\n
  • Step one: You need a Google account. If you don’t have a Gmail account, you can sign up for one here. Otherwise just sign in at plus.google.com. As with Facebook, you need to setup a personal profile before you can setup a parish Page.\n
  • Step five: Once your profile is setup, you can create your Page, by clicking on this link.\n
  • Step five: Once your profile is setup, you can create your Page, by clicking on this link.\n
  • Step six: As with Facebook, you can choose “local business or place” or “company, institution, or organization”. Again we recommend the former. Google will try to find your parish based on the phone number you give in the next step, but if it doesn’t find it, you can add it manually.\n
  • Step six: As with Facebook, you can choose “local business or place” or “company, institution, or organization”. Again we recommend the former. Google will try to find your parish based on the phone number you give in the next step, but if it doesn’t find it, you can add it manually.\n
  • Step seven: Once your page is created, you can access it from the small menu under your profile name.\n
  • Step seven: Once your page is created, you can access it from the small menu under your profile name.\n
  • Step eight: This is part of the Archdiocese’s page. You can see some of the circles we’ve set up that allow us to tailor the message for particular audiences or for all of them. Most posts get sent to Public, but we can also restrict the audience to as few as one person.\n
  • Step eight: This is part of the Archdiocese’s page. You can see some of the circles we’ve set up that allow us to tailor the message for particular audiences or for all of them. Most posts get sent to Public, but we can also restrict the audience to as few as one person.\n
  • Step nine: This is part of the Archdiocese’s profile page showing recent posts. You can be creative with the photos across the top or just let them auto-populate with your most recent photos posted on your page. You can also see how others can comment on your posts, share them with others (like retweeting) and +1 them, which is similar to Facebook’s Like, except +1 can affect how high your content appears in search results on Google’s search engine.\n
  • Step nine: This is part of the Archdiocese’s profile page showing recent posts. You can be creative with the photos across the top or just let them auto-populate with your most recent photos posted on your page. You can also see how others can comment on your posts, share them with others (like retweeting) and +1 them, which is similar to Facebook’s Like, except +1 can affect how high your content appears in search results on Google’s search engine.\n
  • Step ten: This is Google’s interface for adding people to circles. This image shows people already in the Archdiocese’s circles, but you can also search for new people or look at those who’ve added you first.\n
  • Step ten: This is Google’s interface for adding people to circles. This image shows people already in the Archdiocese’s circles, but you can also search for new people or look at those who’ve added you first.\n
  • Let’s consider why we think Google+ may be a significant social network for organizations, like the Catholic Church, which is trying to be present in the world with a Message. This is a normal Google search for the word Catholic by someone who isn’t logged into their Google account. \n
  • Let’s consider why we think Google+ may be a significant social network for organizations, like the Catholic Church, which is trying to be present in the world with a Message. This is a normal Google search for the word Catholic by someone who isn’t logged into their Google account. \n
  • Step twelve: This is the same search with Google’s Social Search using Google+ turned on (from my personal account). Note the different order of the results because people in my circles have shared it or +1 it. Note the listing at the top where I can results of my search for just the people in my circles and how the Archdiocese is listed first. And on the right, where it says People and Pages on Google+. These listings show up for everyone, whether they are Google+ members or not. Marketers are going crazy over this.\n
  • While much of the same content can be posted on Google+ as on Facebook, since it is as yet much less cluttered and less busy than Facebook, your message is less likely to get lost. The presentation gives pride of place to your content, your photos, your message.\n
  • One clear difference from the other social networks is video hangouts, which some innovative organizations are already using to replace in-person meetings. Using your computer’s webcam, you can have up to 10 people in a video meeting. If you just want to broadcast, you can do what’s called a Hangout on Air that can have a near unlimited audience.\n
  • One clear difference from the other social networks is video hangouts, which some innovative organizations are already using to replace in-person meetings. Using your computer’s webcam, you can have up to 10 people in a video meeting. If you just want to broadcast, you can do what’s called a Hangout on Air that can have a near unlimited audience.\n
  • One clear difference from the other social networks is video hangouts, which some innovative organizations are already using to replace in-person meetings. Using your computer’s webcam, you can have up to 10 people in a video meeting. If you just want to broadcast, you can do what’s called a Hangout on Air that can have a near unlimited audience.\n
  • Google is adding collaborative tools so you can all be looking at one text document or a spreadsheet or sketch. The way it works is that intelligent software determines who the primary speaker is at the moment and makes their image and voice most prominent. The White House has used Hangouts On Air for community town halls.\n
  • Google is adding collaborative tools so you can all be looking at one text document or a spreadsheet or sketch. The way it works is that intelligent software determines who the primary speaker is at the moment and makes their image and voice most prominent. The White House has used Hangouts On Air for community town halls.\n
  • Google is adding collaborative tools so you can all be looking at one text document or a spreadsheet or sketch. The way it works is that intelligent software determines who the primary speaker is at the moment and makes their image and voice most prominent. The White House has used Hangouts On Air for community town halls.\n
  • Google is adding collaborative tools so you can all be looking at one text document or a spreadsheet or sketch. The way it works is that intelligent software determines who the primary speaker is at the moment and makes their image and voice most prominent. The White House has used Hangouts On Air for community town halls.\n
  • Google is adding collaborative tools so you can all be looking at one text document or a spreadsheet or sketch. The way it works is that intelligent software determines who the primary speaker is at the moment and makes their image and voice most prominent. The White House has used Hangouts On Air for community town halls.\n
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  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • So what are the best practices for social media? What kind of content is common to all social networks.\n
  • What do you do about spammers and trolls (people trying to sell stuff and people just being obnoxious). We don’t have to tolerate them. Among your materials is a decision-tree proposed by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ communications office for dealing with such material.\n
  • What do you do about spammers and trolls (people trying to sell stuff and people just being obnoxious). We don’t have to tolerate them. Among your materials is a decision-tree proposed by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ communications office for dealing with such material.\n
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  • Social media keeps the Church visible through public engagement. Set expectations\nSocial media builds community through shared interests and information\nCommunity requires accountability and responsibility. Readers must be able to trust you and you have to learn how to know what to trust.\n
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  • This is just the first of what we hope will be several Forums on the topic of social media. Next time we can explore some more advanced topics and perhaps look at some of the other social media sites that are out there.\n\nAll resources, handouts, and videos from today’s session will be available online at pilotnewmedia.com/parishsocialmedia. Today’s forum was streamed live over the Internet and a recording will be available immediately following today’s Forum at bostoncatholiclive.com.\n\nAn edited version of the Forum will be up as quickly as we can at bostoncatholicvideos.com.\n\nNow we have time for some questions.\n

Transcript

  • 1. Effective Social Media for Parishes New Media Forum 2012 presented by Pilot New Media of the Pilot Media Group Catholic Media Secretariat of the Archdiocese of Boston
  • 2. Welcome Scot LandrySecretary for Catholic Media
  • 3. Effective Social Media for Parishes Schedule12:45 - Welcome and Introductions - Scot Landry1:00 - What is social media and why do we care about it? - Scot Landry1:30 - Creating social media sites for your parish - Dom Bettinelli2:15 - Break2:30 - Guidelines for using social media safely - Steve McDevitt2:45 - Questions/Discussion3:15 - End
  • 4. Effective Social Media for Parishes Pilot New Media, TGCL, & RCAB Team Dom Bettinelli Karla Goncalves Rick Heil Anna Johnson Scot Landry George Martell Stacia Morabito Steven McDevitt
  • 5. Catholic Media Secretariat Established July 1, 2010Pope Benedict XVI has called the Church to embrace media tools for the Church’s primary mission – sharing the Good Newsof Jesus Christ.Cardinal Sean seeks to have the tools of media evangelization in one group, to foster innovation, allow for quicker responseand be more effective.The Catholic Media Secretariat is corporately part of BCTV Inc. BCTV Inc. / Catholic Media Secretariat CatholicTV Network Pilot Media Group Radio Apostolate • CatholicTV • Pilot Catholic Newspaper • The Good Catholic Life Program • CatholicTV.com • PilotCatholicNews.com • English - Collaboration w/WQOM • iCatholic.com • Pilot Catholic Directory • Spanish (hopefully in the future) • CatholicTVjr. • Pilot Bulletins • Portuguese (hopefully in the future) • etc. • Pilot Printing • Pilot New Media
  • 6. Why embrace digital media?Pope Benedict XVI (2010)“Without fear we must set sail on the digital sea, facing into the deepwith the same passion that has governed the ship of the Church fortwo thousand years…[W]e want to qualify ourselves by living in thedigital world with a believer’s heart, helping to give a soul to theInternet’s incessant flow of communication.”
  • 7. Why embrace digital media?Bishop Ron Herzog, USCCB Chair of Communications Committee (2011)“Although social media has been around for less than 10 years, itdoesn’t have the makings of a fad. We’re being told that it iscausing as fundamental a shift in communication patterns andbehavior as the printing press did 500 years ago. And I don’t think Ihave to remind you of what happened when the Catholic Churchwas slow to adapt to that new technology,” [referencing theProtestant Reformation.]
  • 8. Important Forms of Digital MediaWebsites (October 2011) - pilotnewmedia.com/parishwebsitesMobile applications & versions of websitesSocial Media (Today’s Topic)BlogsVideo (YouTube, Vimeo, Ustream)
  • 9. What is social media?A type of online media or website that allows and fosters conversation anddialogue among groups of peopleTraditional media typically delivers content in one direction (broadcast), butdoesn’t allow readers/listeners/viewers to participate in the creation ordevelopment of the content“Social media essentially is a category of online media where people aretalking, participating, sharing, networking, and bookmarking online.” (RonJones, Internet marketing consultant)
  • 10. What is social media?There are dozens of social media sites, but we will focus on three main ones here. Facebook Twitter Google+
  • 11. What is social media?Facebook is like a bulletin board where you can post updates on your life,thoughts on current events, photos, links to interesting websites.Twitter is similar except it has a limit of 140 characters per update. Thatcreates a faster paced and pithy style of conversation and sharing.Google+ combines the best aspects of Facebook and Twitter, eliminating muchof the clutter of Facebook while giving more flexibility than Twitter. And it hasa different and perhaps better way to organize your social circle.
  • 12. Facebook800 million active usersMore than 50% log on in any given dayAverage user is connected to 80 community pages, groups,and eventsHas 130 friends http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • 13. Twitter500 million users total by March; 250 million active users(those using on a daily basis) by end of 2012 http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/twitter-active-total-users_b17655
  • 14. Google Plus Launched last July in private beta and opened to the public in November Has 90 million users already On track to have 400 million by end of 2012 Because it is integrally connected to Google search, content on Google+ potentially has a very wide reach http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2012/01/google-claims-90-million-google-users-60-active-daily.arshttp://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2011/12/google-may-reach-400-million-users-by-end-of-2012.html
  • 15. Isn’t social media a waste of time?Studies show that people’s use of Facebook and Twitter correlate to greater in-person social interactions. People who are social online are social offline.http://www.exacttarget.com/resources/SFF_7.pdfIt has come to be an essential medium for Moms. Moms spend more timeonline daily than the general population and moms are highly active onFacebook, with 62% of American mothers having a profile there.http://www.edisonresearch.com/home/archives/2011/08/moms-and-media-2011.php
  • 16. Why is social media important to my parish or ministry?After they check their email, the most common website people go to every morning is Facebook.It has become a place for people to have a profile, even if they never use it, except as a way to be connected.It’s their permanent contact information, the place where you can connect with them even if they move or change theiremail or phone number.People want to get information about the things that interest them the most: movies, TV shows, causes, events, andorganizations.Twitter allows people to be connected and share what’s on their mind from their computer or their smartphone orwherever, in short bursts.
  • 17. Pastoral Planning opportunityParish Service Teams (PSTs) serving more than one parishcan have multiple social media pages/sites for their variousministries and repurpose the same content across all ofthem, if necessary. Allows communication through a centralmedium. Do more with less.
  • 18. New Media Trivia Question What was the purpose of Cardinal Seán’s tripthat became the first entries in his blog in 2006?
  • 19. Getting Started Domenico Bettinelli, Jr.Creative Director, Pilot New Media
  • 20. What is social media?Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 21. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 22. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 23. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 24. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 25. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.” YouTube: “Watch me eating a donut.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 26. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.” YouTube: “Watch me eating a donut.” LinkedIn: “My skills include donut eating.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 27. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.” YouTube: “Watch me eating a donut.” LinkedIn: “My skills include donut eating.” Pinterest: “Here’s a donut recipe. And a beautiful photo of it.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 28. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.” YouTube: “Watch me eating a donut.” LinkedIn: “My skills include donut eating.” Pinterest: “Here’s a donut recipe. And a beautiful photo of it.” Last.fm: “Listening to a song about donuts.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 29. What is social media? Twitter: “I’m eating a donut.” Facebook: “I like donuts.” Foursquare: “This is where I eat donuts.” Instagram: “Here’s a vintage photo of my donut.” YouTube: “Watch me eating a donut.” LinkedIn: “My skills include donut eating.” Pinterest: “Here’s a donut recipe. And a beautiful photo of it.” Last.fm: “Listening to a song about donuts.” Google+: “I’m a Google employee who eats donuts.”Credit for original version: http://instagr.am/p/nm695/
  • 30. Effective Social Media for Your Parish“I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 31. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 32. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Your website is a
  • 33. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Your website is a destination
  • 34. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Your website is a destination Social media is a
  • 35. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Your website is a destination Social media is a gateway
  • 36. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 37. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”You don’t just expect people to wander in the door of your parish.
  • 38. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 39. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 40. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 41. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?”
  • 42. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Relationships
  • 43. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Meaningful Relationships
  • 44. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Meaningful Relationships Engagement
  • 45. “I already have a website. Why do I need social media?” Meaningful Relationships Engagement Dialogue
  • 46. Effective Social Media for Your Parish “I’m a priest. Do I need social media?”
  • 47. “I’m a priest. Do I need social media?”
  • 48. “I’m a priest. Do I need social media?”Not every priest needs to be on Facebook/Twitter/Google+
  • 49. “I’m a priest. Do I need social media?”Not every priest needs to be on Facebook/Twitter/Google+ But every parish does
  • 50. Effective Social Media for Your Parish“How do I find the time to maintain a social media site?”
  • 51. “How do I find the time to maintain a social media site?”
  • 52. “How do I find the time to maintain a social media site?” Automation 5 minutes per day 30 minutes per week Spread out the workload
  • 53. Effective Social Media for Your Parish Creating your Social Media page
  • 54. Creating your Social Media page
  • 55. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 56. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Page vs. Profile vs. Group
  • 57. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Page vs. Profile vs. GroupProfile is an individual, a personPage is a brand, public figure, cause, or organizationGroup is for small group communication
  • 58. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 59. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 60. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 61. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
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  • 90. Creating your Social Media page
  • 91. Creating your Social Media page
  • 92. Creating your Social Media page Facebook.com/stanthonyfresno
  • 93. Creating your Social Media page
  • 94. Creating your Social Media page
  • 95. Creating your Social Media page www.stanthonyfresno.com
  • 96. Creating your Social Media page
  • 97. Creating your Social Media page
  • 98. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 99. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 100. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentCheck-in at the parishPhotosPrayer requestsDiscussion pointsParish, diocesan, national, international news
  • 101. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 102. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content Separate Pages for each ministry
  • 103. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content Separate Pages for each ministry Youth Ministry Religious Education Young Adults Moms Men’s Group
  • 104. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 105. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 106. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentPhotos Web links
  • 107. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content Photos Web linksPush your content higher on user’s News Feeds
  • 108. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 109. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Content
  • 110. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentAdd related pages to your page’s favorites
  • 111. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentAdd related pages to your page’s favorites
  • 112. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentAdd related pages to your page’s favorites
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  • 115. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall.
  • 116. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall. @
  • 117. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall. @ BostonCatholic
  • 118. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall. @ BostonCatholic
  • 119. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall. @ BostonCatholic
  • 120. Creating your Social Media page Facebook ContentUse @ tags when mentioning other Pages so that your content shows on their Page Wall. @ BostonCatholic
  • 121. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 122. Creating your Social Media page Facebook
  • 123. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Advanced Topics
  • 124. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Advanced TopicsFacebook ads
  • 125. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Advanced TopicsFacebook ads Auto-post from the website
  • 126. Creating your Social Media page Facebook Advanced TopicsFacebook ads Facebook events Auto-post from the website
  • 127. Creating your Social Media page
  • 128. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 129. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 130. Creating your Social Media page TwitterMicroblogSocial NetworkReal-Time Information NetworkSocial Search Engine
  • 131. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 132. Creating your Social Media page TwitterWhat’s on your mind?
  • 133. Creating your Social Media page TwitterWhat’s on your mind in 140 characters or less ?
  • 134. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 135. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 136. Creating your Social Media page TwitterDirect Message (DM): A private note between two users. They must follow each other.
  • 137. Creating your Social Media page TwitterDirect Message (DM): A private note between two users. They must follow each other.Follow: The act of following someone on Twitter, i.e. seeing their Tweets in your timeline. There is no obligation tofollow back, but for some it’s good manners. You can block abusive followers, such as spammers.
  • 138. Creating your Social Media page TwitterDirect Message (DM): A private note between two users. They must follow each other.Follow: The act of following someone on Twitter, i.e. seeing their Tweets in your timeline. There is no obligation tofollow back, but for some it’s good manners. You can block abusive followers, such as spammers.Hashtags: Words or abbreviations preceded by a # (no spaces). Like a subject line or a topic. Often used for tweetsabout a particular event.
  • 139. Creating your Social Media page TwitterDirect Message (DM): A private note between two users. They must follow each other.Follow: The act of following someone on Twitter, i.e. seeing their Tweets in your timeline. There is no obligation tofollow back, but for some it’s good manners. You can block abusive followers, such as spammers.Hashtags: Words or abbreviations preceded by a # (no spaces). Like a subject line or a topic. Often used for tweetsabout a particular event.ReTweet (RT): Forwarding someone else’s Tweet to your followers.
  • 140. Creating your Social Media page TwitterDirect Message (DM): A private note between two users. They must follow each other.Follow: The act of following someone on Twitter, i.e. seeing their Tweets in your timeline. There is no obligation tofollow back, but for some it’s good manners. You can block abusive followers, such as spammers.Hashtags: Words or abbreviations preceded by a # (no spaces). Like a subject line or a topic. Often used for tweetsabout a particular event.ReTweet (RT): Forwarding someone else’s Tweet to your followers.Reply/Mention: Putting @ and another username in your Tweet means that user will usually get a notification. Canbe used for conversations or to send a public message.
  • 141. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 142. Creating your Social Media page Twitter
  • 143. Creating your Social Media page Twitter Check out my first Tweet!
  • 144. Creating your Social Media page Twitter Check out my first Tweet! #bostonparish
  • 145. Creating your Social Media page Twitter@BostonCatholic Check out my first Tweet! #bostonparish
  • 146. Creating your Social Media page Twitterd BostonCatholic Check out my first Tweet! #bostonparish
  • 147. Creating your Social Media page TwitterRT @StAnyName Check out my first Tweet! #bostonparish
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  • 181. Creating your Social Media page
  • 182. Creating your Social Media page
  • 183. Creating your Social Media page Twitter.com/BostonCatholic
  • 184. Creating your Social Media page
  • 185. Creating your Social Media page Twitter Content
  • 186. Creating your Social Media page TwitterContent
  • 187. Creating your Social Media page TwitterContentEvent-based tweeting Parish mission, youth ministry outing, parish picnicBreaking news and announcementsQuick hits: daily verses, prayersRetweet others, create a conversation, curate content of community interestFollow others, follow those who follow you
  • 188. Creating your Social Media page
  • 189. Creating your Social Media page
  • 190. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus
  • 191. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus
  • 192. Creating your Social Media page Google PlusSearch-engine optimization Video “hangouts” Organizing and segregating your audience
  • 193. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus
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  • 219. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus
  • 220. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content
  • 221. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content
  • 222. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content Meetings
  • 223. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content Hangouts
  • 224. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content Hangouts
  • 225. Creating your Social Media page Google Plus Content Hangouts
  • 226. Creating your Social Media page
  • 227. Effective Social Media for Your Parish Best Practices for All
  • 228. Best Practices for All
  • 229. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!
  • 230. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiences
  • 231. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adults
  • 232. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.
  • 233. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on Twitter
  • 234. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on TwitterLook for good information posted by others and re-share to your audience
  • 235. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on TwitterLook for good information posted by others and re-share to your audienceFind your unique voice/personality. Social media wants authenticity.
  • 236. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on TwitterLook for good information posted by others and re-share to your audienceFind your unique voice/personality. Social media wants authenticity.Encourage staff & volunteers to be active
  • 237. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on TwitterLook for good information posted by others and re-share to your audienceFind your unique voice/personality. Social media wants authenticity.Encourage staff & volunteers to be activePromote to your parishioners. Encourage them to use it.
  • 238. Best Practices for AllPhotos! Lots of Photos!Divide up responsibility for different audiencesSocial media is not just for teens or young adultsSpend some time getting a sense of how others use the platform. Learn the culture.Start slow, 4-6 posts/week on Facebook; 4-6/day on TwitterLook for good information posted by others and re-share to your audienceFind your unique voice/personality. Social media wants authenticity.Encourage staff & volunteers to be activePromote to your parishioners. Encourage them to use it.Links from your website, letterhead, email signatures, yard sign, etc.
  • 239. Best Practices for All
  • 240. Best Practices for All Spammers and Trolls
  • 241. Best Practices for All Spammers and Trolls Keep watch!
  • 242. Best Practices for All
  • 243. Best Practices for All Tools
  • 244. Best Practices for All ToolsHootsuite.com
  • 245. Best Practices for All Tools Hootsuite.comTweetdeck and other PC apps
  • 246. Best Practices for All Tools Hootsuite.comTweetdeck and other PC apps iPhone and Android apps
  • 247. Best Practices for All Tools Hootsuite.comTweetdeck and other PC apps iPhone and Android apps Twitterfeed.com
  • 248. Best Practices for All Tools Hootsuite.comTweetdeck and other PC apps PublishSync iPhone and Android apps Twitterfeed.com
  • 249. Best Practices for All Tools Hootsuite.com MoreTweetdeck and other PC apps PublishSync iPhone and Android apps Twitterfeed.com
  • 250. Tools Hootsuite.com MoreTweetdeck and other PC apps PublishSync iPhone and Android apps Twitterfeed.com
  • 251. Other Social Media
  • 252. Other Social MediaLinkedInYouTubeFlickrFoursquarePinterestThe Next Big Thing
  • 253. Social Media Guidelines Steven McDevittDirector of Information Technology
  • 254. Social Media Guidelines2010• US Conference of Catholic Bishops communications office issues social media guidelines intended to help dioceses formulate their own• RCAB issues first draft of social media guidelines for parishes and ministries based largely on the USCCB guidelines.
  • 255. Social Media GuidelinesNot exhaustiveCommon senseSupplemental to code of ministerial conductNot just restrictive, but also prescriptive for good ministryProtects laity, clergy, children, and the Church
  • 256. USCCB GuidelinesVisibilityCommunityAccountability
  • 257. USCCB GuidelinesDefine appropriate boundaries for communicationCodes of conduct posted on social networking sitesProvide instructions for parish personnel, especially those new to social mediaProvide recommendations on how to deal with difficult “fans.”Provide trusted sites for reference, and recommend that site administratorshave a thorough knowledge of these sites.Remind site administrators they are posting for a broad audience
  • 258. USCCB GuidelinesRules of the Road Abide by diocesan/parish guidelines. Know that even personal communication by church personnel reflects the Church. Practice what you preach. Write in first person. Do not claim to represent the official position of the organization or the teachings of the Church, unless authorized to do so. Identify yourself. Do not use pseudonyms or the name of the parish, program, etc., as your identity, unless authorized to do so. Abide by copyright, fair use, and IRS financial disclosure regulations. Do not divulge confidential information about others. Nothing posted on the Internet is private. Don’t cite others, post photos or videos of them, link to their material, etc., without their approval. Practice Christian charity.
  • 259. USCCB GuidelinesSocial Networking with Minors Permission to contact via social media or post pictures, video, or other identifying information Parents must have all access Save copies of all conversations Minimum age for most sites is 13 years old Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (http://www.coppa.org/)
  • 260. USCCB GuidelinesPersonal Sites Reflect Catholic values Using social media can put you in the public eye Disclaimer on personal websites
  • 261. USCCB GuidelinesReporting and monitoring Unofficial sites bearing archdiocesan or parish logo Misinformation (Wikipedia, Masstimes.org) Contact Dom Bettinelli
  • 262. RCAB Social Media Guidelines “For the purpose of this policy, church personnel means all employees, volunteers, priests, deacons, and religious sisters andbrothers who work for or represent the Archdiocese of Boston, one of its Parishes, or any other organization or entity related to the Archdiocese of Boston or one of its Parishes.”
  • 263. RCAB Social Media GuidelinesEstablishing a social media site Created, maintained, held, controlled by church personnel Use an official parish or archdiocesan email address, except where not possible, i.e. Facebook Passwords kept in a central location with access for Pastor No personal profile information All content must reflect Catholic faith and values Account settings maximize privacy of users Code of Conduct for third-party content No advertising for non-Church related websites, events, or products. Spam should be deleted. The individual is responsible for what he or she writes; You represent the Church.
  • 264. RCAB Social Media GuidelinesCompliance with Law and Church Policies Do not misuse other people’s intellectual property. Just because you find an image in a Google search does not mean you are free to use it. Assume you are not. There are sources of public domain images online, including Wikimedia Commons and some photos on Flickr. Likewise with audio and video. Do not post confidential information related to the Archdiocese or Parish Inappropriate postings: obscene, harassing, defamatory, offensive, derogatory, or potentially scandalous. Several archdiocesan policies are operative in social media Do not mix personal and ministerial sites; don’t cause confusion for the user Written permission must be obtained before posting pictures or other identifying information of individuals, especially children. Blanket permission can be sought.
  • 265. RCAB Social Media GuidelinesContact with Children Boundary issues are the same as person-to-person communication The written word lacks the nuance of body language. Be careful of being misunderstood, especially by children. Parents should always be informed on contact with their children via social media. Parents should be able to receive the same information their children if not in the same medium. Receive permission from parents before communicating with minors online or when posting any information about their children online All contact information should come from parents, not from children directly. Individual church personnel should not “friend” children in ministry from their personal profiles nor should they seek them out online to be added to ministry social networking sites. Save copies of all conversations, especially if it involves personal sharing. Inappropriate communication should be reported immediately.
  • 266. RCAB Social Media GuidelinesPersonal sites Disclaimer You represent the Church, even on personal sites. Reflect Catholic values Do not use for professional or ministerial purposes Do not use Archdiocesan or parish logos or trademarks
  • 267. RCAB Social Media GuidelinesMonitoring and Discipline The Archdiocese and Parish should monitor all official social media sites and delete all inappropriate material promptly. They reserve the right to monitor personal sites. Violation of policies or laws may subject personnel to discipline. Monitor third-party groups or unofficial pages or websites for inappropriate content or inaccuracies.
  • 268. Effective Social Media for Parisheshttp://www.pilotnewmedia.com/parishsocialmedia http://www.bostoncatholiclive.com http://www.bostoncatholicvideos.com Please fill out your feedback forms