Challenge-Based Learning

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Presentation slides for Pre-Conference Workshop at PETE & C 2010

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  • In effective assessments, we see a match between the type or format of the assessment and the needed evidence of achieving the desired results. If the goal is for students to learn basic facts and skills, then paper-and-pencil tests and quizzes generally provide adequate and efficient measures. However, when the goal is deep understanding, we rely on more complex performances to determine whether our goal has been reached. The graphic below reveals the general relationship between assessment types and the evidence they provide for different curriculum targets.
  • Click for “Knowing is binary”
    Click again for “Understanding is a matter of degree”
  • Click for “Knowing is binary”
    Click again for “Understanding is a matter of degree”
  • See handout (no page number) on rear of next sheet following p. 190
  • Assessment checklist immediately following Slide p. 52.
  • Often projects involve field research, interviews, library visits, and community inquiry.
    Scope should be determined before projects start.
    Consider student experience/readiness, schedule, subject/content, teacher comfort/expertise
    from Buck Institute
  • Developmental and readiness considerations

    from Buck Institute
  • from Buck Institute
  • Challenge-Based Learning

    1. 1. Challenge-Based Learning for Responsible and Engaged Learners Bill Dolton Adjunct Faculty, Wilkes University Educational Technology Consultant, William Dolton LLC Retired Supervisor of Educational Technology, LMSD bill@doltonroad.com
    2. 2. Agenda • What is Challenge-Based Learning? • Project Rubric & Larger Context Big Idea & Essential Questions Scaffold Performance Design Assessment • Sharing & Next Steps
    3. 3. ? What Is Challenge- Based Learning?
    4. 4. creative commons attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ronsho/587483238/ semantics are important creative commons attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ fchouse/2635218505/
    5. 5. Project-Based Learning ... more than doing projects ...
    6. 6. Problem-Based Learning
    7. 7. Problem-Based Learning focus on problem-solution
    8. 8. Challenge-Based Learning broader range of inquiry
    9. 9. Range of Challenges • Experimental Inquiry • Problem-Solving • Decision-Making • Investigation • Systems Analysis • Invention
    10. 10. to teach scaffold learning creative commons attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/qilin/203966534/
    11. 11. engaging authentic challenging significant
    12. 12. Big Ideas and Essential Questions
    13. 13. Matrix of Essential Questions Overarching Topical • broad and deep • stimulate inquiry • open & alive; lasting & • deepen understanding Open recurring • not answerable by unit • cut across unit, course, & end often subject boundaries • cut across unit, course, • unit-specific Guiding and often subject • yield one or several boundaries definitive or settled core • yield one or more understandings desired understandings -- from Wiggins and McTighe, UbD 2nd ed., p. 116
    14. 14. Scope/Intent Insights • Topical questions are necessary to focus on unit understanding but not sufficient for transfer or connections beyond the unit • Overarching/Open questions alone cannot link to core curriculum and can result in aimless discussion or frustrate students • Guiding questions alone can stifle intellectual freedom, inhibit student questions, and limit deep understanding • Topical questions must be explicitly matched with Overarching questions to be essential and lead students to on-going inquiry
    15. 15. Misconception Alert • A Leading Question is answerable by just remembering what was said or read, or knowing where to find the answer • A Topical Question demands analysis, interpretation, and construction of arguments — in other words, real thought, not just recall • The CONTEXT of use in the classroom is the key difference
    16. 16. The best units offer “a delicate mix of open and guiding as well as topical and overarching inquiries ... show[ing] that intellectual freedom and creativity are valued alongside the most powerful insights of experts.” –Wiggins and McTighe, UbD 2nd ed., p. 118
    17. 17. Essential Questions Questions Matrix of Essential Worksheet Overarching Topical • broad and deep • stimulate inquiry • open & alive; lasting & • deepen understanding Open recurring • not answerable by unit • cut across unit, course, & end often subject boundaries • cut across unit, course, • unit-specific Guiding and often subject • yield one or several boundaries definitive or settled core • yield one or more understandings desired understandings -- from Wiggins and McTighe, UbD 2nd ed., p. 116
    18. 18. Sample Questions • What are numerators and denominators? • How can I be healthy? • What are the parts of a cell? • How did early explorers change the world? • How can we make a difference? • In what ways does our constitution protect our rights?
    19. 19. Performance Assessment
    20. 20. Curricular Priorities & Assessment Methods
    21. 21. Principles of Effective Assessment Photo Album vs. Snapshot Match Measures with Goals
    22. 22. Principles of Effective Assessment Photo Album vs. Snapshot Match Measures with Goals Knowing is binary;
    23. 23. Principles of Effective Assessment Photo Album vs. Snapshot Match Measures with Goals Knowing is binary; Understanding is a matter of degree.
    24. 24. Like the judicial system, we need a “preponderance of evidence” to convict students of learning! –Jay McTighe
    25. 25. Inauthentic Work Authentic Work Fill in the blank Conduct research using primary sources Select an answer from given choices Debate a controversial issue Answer recall questions at end of chapter Conduct a scientific investigation Solve contrived problems Solve “real-world” problems Practice decontextualized skills Interpret literature Diagram sentences Do purposeful writing for an audience –from Tomlinson & McTighe, Integrating Differentiated Instruction & Understanding by Design, p. 68
    26. 26. Characteristics of Performance Tasks • Realistically contextualized • Requires judgment and innovation • Student must “do” the subject • Replicates situations that “test” adults • Negotiating a complex, multi-stage task • Opportunities to rehearse & get feedback –from UbD, 2nd ed., pp. 153-155
    27. 27. Using GRASPS • Goal • Role • Audience • Situation • Product, Performance, and Purpose • Standards & Criteria for Success
    28. 28. Validity • Criterion-referenced • Directly aligned with standards, benchmarks, understandings, questions • Rubric development • Self-Test of Assessment
    29. 29. Reliability • Replicable results • Common assessment tool
    30. 30. Significance of Results • Criterion-referenced against standards and benchmarks • Comparison with Diagnostic Assessment to demonstrate growth • Both contribute to significance
    31. 31. Assessment Checklist • Aligned with Standards, Understandings, & Essential Questions • Performance-based context • Authentic situation (student perspective) • Variety of formats or modes of response involving some student choices • Established criteria • Tasks demonstrate understanding
    32. 32. Scaffold / Design
    33. 33. Scope Small Project Ambitious Project Duration 5 to 10 days Semester Multiple Disciplines Breadth 1 Topic, 1 Standard & Standards Technology Limited Extensive Outreach Classroom-based Community-based Multiple Teachers & Partnership One Teacher Community Audience Classroom, School Expert Panel
    34. 34. Student Role Limited Maximum Student Input Student Input Teacher selects Teacher solicits Students select topic student input topic Teacher crafts Students Students develop essential personalize questions questions questions Teacher defines Teacher & Students define learning students learning outcomes negotiate outcomes
    35. 35. Student Autonomy Limited Maximum Student Autonomy Student Autonomy Teacher defines Students define Teacher solicits products and products and student input activities activities Teacher controls Students are Students timeline and pace given some determine of the project choices timeline and pace
    36. 36. Sharing / Next Steps
    37. 37. Resources • Challenge-Based Learning http://ali.apple.com/cbl • Intelhttp://www.intel.com/education/elements Teach Elements • Buckhttp://www.pbl-online.org Institute for Education • Edutopia http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning • Project-Based Learning wiki https://lmsd-pbl.wikispaces.com
    38. 38. Challenge-Based Learning for Responsible and Engaged Learners Bill Dolton Adjunct Faculty, Wilkes University Educational Technology Consultant, William Dolton LLC Retired Supervisor of Educational Technology, LMSD bill@doltonroad.com

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