Time, Topic and Trawl:stories about how we reach our past       JoonSuk Lee - Two Years Old (1973.4.12 @ Seoul, Korea)
GoogleSummer, 20103 month
Everyday Research“ordinary” people (e.g. not information professionals) engagein what they call “research,” in ways that a...
hmm...
Bookmarks & Web Histories• 81% (58%) of web visits  is revisitation• Bookmarks are used in  2.7% of Web navigation• Web hi...
Bookmarks & Web Histories• Chronological Ordering• No Context• Tag-Based• Project-Based
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                  ...
Trip                                         CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 201...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes                                         ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012                                       Tripm...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                  ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                  ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                  ...
CSCW 2013                                                           May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                ...
CSCW 2013                                                           May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012ne                                  ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012                                    ...
CSCW 2013                                                         May 25, 2012mes 2012                                    ...
XHow people conduct their web activities.
How people remembertheir past web activities.
We need to move away from “an obsession with capturingeverything” and to start asking what it means to supporthuman memory...
The Research Trails System• Time (Activity-Based)• Topic (Semantic)
Missions• Understandings about how people view their past web  activities.• Formatively evaluation of the system.
The Study• 11 Participants• Two Interviews per Week for 8 Weeks• Google Web-Histories & Prototype Trails System
Stories...
Difficulties...
Phenomenologically-Situated Take on          Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages on two individuals’ webhistories ...
Phenomenologically-Situated Take on          Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages may entail more thanone interpret...
Phenomenologically-Situated Take on          Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages could hold differentinterpretatio...
Good Enough Clustering?
Googlepresented at DIS 2012 on 6/13/2012                                  Thank you.                      Virginia Tech   ...
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past
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Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past

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  • Hello, My name is Joon Suk Lee and that’s me as well. \n\nI was two years old.\nAnd obviously, I don’t really remember anything about that moment.\nMy parents told me that the photo was taken at my grandparents house in Seoul.\nBut when I look at the photo, I still see my childhood.\nIt’s not like I am looking at some random boy’s photo.\nI am looking at me and I am having memories of my past.\nThe memories of my childhood are quite vague and fuzzy. \nBut when I look at that photo, \nin my mind, \nall those fuzzy bits of my memories come together\nand become a story. \n\nMy talk today is about how people create their own stories about their own pasts.\n
  • This paper is about the work that I did over the summer in 2010 at Google.\n\nI worked in Google research division as an intern. \n\nMy manager was Dr. Elin Peterson, \n\nand she needed a person who could conduct a field study. \n
  • At that time, she was building a tool that could help people conducting everyday research.\nand by “Everyday Research”\nshe meant kinds of activities that laypeople do on the web that are distinct from what we call “research” in academia or in industry.\nSo, people do “research” in their everyday lives to carry out mundane tasks \nsuch as planning family trips to unknown countries, or buying a new car.\nPeople sometimes do these kinds of activities in one sitting, but most of the time \nthese activities last for days, weeks even months.\nIn conducting these kinds of activities, people tend to frequently go back to the web pages they previously visited.\nSo Dr. Peterson was building a web tool that could help people re-find and re-visit the previously visited pages.\n
  • hmm.... \nBut don’t we already have such kinds of tools?\n(PAUSE)\n\n
  • We have bookmarks and web-histories. These are tools designed for revisitation.\n\n
  • However, people do not use bookmarks and histories much.\n\nStudies show that 60 to 80% of web visits are revisitation.\n\nBut bookmarks are only used in 2.7% of web activities.\n\nWeb histories are even worse. Only .2%.\n\n\n
  • Bookmark and Web histories are tools that might help you to find pages you visited before.\nBut only in some cases. \nAnd if you try really hard.\n\nWeb histories typically present every single page you visited in the past \nin chronological order only. And people typically have tons of pages in their histories. \n\nMoreover, histories do not usually contain any contextual information about what you were doing when you were visiting the site. Your web history does not know if you visited New York Times to scan headlines or to take a quick look at the latest stock price.\n\nBookmarks are even worse in that sense. It does not have any structure unless you manually put them into folders and sub folders. Bookmarks do not have context information either.\n\nAnd some researchers tried to improve bookmarks and web histories by making users predefine a project before they start working on the web in order to capture all the activities under that predefined project.\nOr some others tried to use tags to manage bookmarks.\n\nHowever, all these solutions require users to identify their needs in advance.\n\nThese solutions prematurely identify and create the interpretation of users’ pasts \nat the moment of data collection, \neven though users’ perception over the same data might change over time.\n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • [5:10]\nFor example, these are some of the web pages that I visited last month.\n<CLICK> In early May, I was working on a trip planning to come here. I visited a bunch of travel related web sites quite often.\n<CLICK> Towards the end of May, I was writing a paper for a conference next year. So I visited the conference site several times.\n<CLICK> And after submitting the paper, I was back to my trip planning task.\n<CLICK> But Today\nI am looking back at my past web activities. Right at this moment. \n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • Most studies that look at people’s web behavior \nstudy how people conduct web activities \nwhen they are conducing the activities.\nSo these studies would have looked at me \nand investigated how I conducted web searching and web browsing \nwhile I performed these activities,\ninstead of looking at me now as I look back into my past histories.\n\nSimilarly Bookmarks and Web-Histories are tools that \n<CLICK> create interpretations of people’s web activities while collecting the data about them. These interpretations are intended to be useful <CLICK> in the future.\nMy research is different from most other research in that \n<CLICK> I am trying to understand how people view their past when they are engaged in “remembering” tasks.\n<CLICK> When users are creating their own interpretations about their past \n<CLICK> by utilizing traces they left in the past.\nThe difference might look quite small. But it is indeed a big difference.\n\n
  • I am not trying to understand how people conduct their web activities.\n
  • I \nAM \ntrying to understand how people REMEMBER their past web activities.\n
  • Again, most web tools such as bookmarks and web histories are only concerned about capturing all the details about users’ web activities. But they do not really provide users with ways that can help them remember.\n\nAs Sellen and Whittaker said, we need to move away from an obsession with capturing everything \nand start asking what it means to support human memory and how we can go about designing useful aids.\n
  • SO when I got to Google, Dr. Pedersen had a prototype research trails system.\n\nThe system basically used two kinds of algorithms to cluster users’ past web activities into groupings.\n\nThe system used time information as well as topic information to cluster web pages. And by adjusting different weight values and parameters, the system could generate different set of clusterings.\n \n\n\n\n
  • As an intern, I had to two clear goals.\n\nFirst, I needed to investigate how people view their past web activities.\n\nSecond, I needed to test the prototype Research Trails System to conduct formative evaluation.\n
  • So for the study, I recruited 11 participants and had interviews with them twice a week for 8 weeks at participants’ home and workplaces.\n\nParticipants were asked to turn on Google’s server side web history feature so that we can capture histories from not just a main computer but from all the different computers users used during the time.\n\nDuring the interviews, I went over participants’ web histories with them and asked them what they were doing while they were visiting the page.\n\nRemember, I asked them to tell me what they HAD been doing, but I was not looking for accuracy. I was looking for what they said NOW about what they were doing THEN.\n\nI also showed participants clusterings that Trails System generated and asked them if the groupings made any sense and if the groupings reflected what they were doing.\n\nBut again I was interested not in whether the grouping would have made sense when they were originally doing the web searches, but whether they made sense at the time of inteview.\n
  • [11:00]\n\nDetailed findings and discussions can be found in our paper. \n\nHere, I will just present a few examples of how people viewed their past web activities.\n\nThe system generated groupings called research trails.\n\nResearch trails supposedly reflect users’ perception of their past web activities.\n
  • Can you tell me what \n<CLICK> going to online diaper stores \n<CLICK> reading information about incorporating a small business \n<CLICK> and looking at the real estate information \nhave in common? \n(PAUSE)\nAllison was a female participants. She was 31 years old and had been married for a few years.\nShe had a lifetime goal of opening a diaper store in the Mountain View area. \nSo she constantly visited various online diaper and baby product stores to gather information about different merchandise. \nShe also actively searched for information on the process of incorporating a business \nas well as on real-estate prices and locations in the area. \nOften, she looked up real-estate information right before or after browsing merchandise information on the web. \nThe Research Trails system was able to group those three seemingly unrelated topics under one trail.\n
  • Can you tell me what \n<CLICK> going to online diaper stores \n<CLICK> reading information about incorporating a small business \n<CLICK> and looking at the real estate information \nhave in common? \n(PAUSE)\nAllison was a female participants. She was 31 years old and had been married for a few years.\nShe had a lifetime goal of opening a diaper store in the Mountain View area. \nSo she constantly visited various online diaper and baby product stores to gather information about different merchandise. \nShe also actively searched for information on the process of incorporating a business \nas well as on real-estate prices and locations in the area. \nOften, she looked up real-estate information right before or after browsing merchandise information on the web. \nThe Research Trails system was able to group those three seemingly unrelated topics under one trail.\n
  • Can you tell me what \n<CLICK> going to online diaper stores \n<CLICK> reading information about incorporating a small business \n<CLICK> and looking at the real estate information \nhave in common? \n(PAUSE)\nAllison was a female participants. She was 31 years old and had been married for a few years.\nShe had a lifetime goal of opening a diaper store in the Mountain View area. \nSo she constantly visited various online diaper and baby product stores to gather information about different merchandise. \nShe also actively searched for information on the process of incorporating a business \nas well as on real-estate prices and locations in the area. \nOften, she looked up real-estate information right before or after browsing merchandise information on the web. \nThe Research Trails system was able to group those three seemingly unrelated topics under one trail.\n
  • The second story is about Lindsay, a 27-year-old female.\n\nOne day she went to her college and high school alumni sites to update her status information. \n\nWhen she was done updating her profile on both sites, she spent time browsing through status information on different people with whom she went to school. \n\nShe found out that one of her friends is now living in France and has a boyfriend who is a professional basketball player. \n\nCurious about the player, she looked up his name. \n\nThe system was able to capture browsing alumni site activities and the one-time search of the basketball player into one group.\n
  • So the research tails \nat least in some cases\nworked quite well \nand the trails it generated pleasantly surprised our participants.\n\nHowever, we also had some difficulties.\n
  • So the first difficulty that we had was,\nin some cases, \nthe same set of web pages could mean two totally different things for two different people.\n\nFor example, most participants considered their trips and travels as one-time events.\n\nHowever, I had one participant who went to the ComicCon event during the time I was conducting the interviews.\n\nShe searched different information for the trip on the web \nand when I asked how she would view her activities, she told me that going to the ComicCon is a part of her life-long trip planning project. \nThis trip did not stand alone as an individual event for her. It was a small part of her life-long “going to fun places” project.\n\n
  • Another problem was that even for the same person, same set of web pages could mean different things based on what the person was actually doing while visiting the site.\n\nFor example, Diaper Store Lady, Allison.\n\nfrequently visited online diaper stores.\n\nSometime she visited the stores to research her life-long goal of opening a diaper store.\n\nOther times, she visited the online stores to actually buy diapers for her daughter. \n\nOr she also visited the stores to buy gifts for her friends.\n\nSo for her, “going to online diaper stores” meant three different kinds of activities based on what she was doing on that site.\n\n
  • Also, in some cases, the same user had multiple different interpretations of the same web history at different times.\nFor instance, I had a female participant. She had been married for a few years, and did not have any children.\nAfter I met her 3 or 4 times, I noticed she had read an article online about the safety of air traveling while pregnant. \nWhen I asked her why she had visited that site, she said she was just reading random articles on the web. And she also said she does not have any intention of having a baby yet. She might think about having a baby in the future. But it was not any part of an on-going research activity.\n\nThen toward the end of two months, she told me that she finally decided to have a baby and she’s now conducting intensive research activities on the web to find out more about pregnancy in general. \n\nSo in this case, the same action meant two different things for her at different times. It would be almost impossible for a system to tell the difference.\n\n\n
  • So the research trails do not work perfectly. \nIt is very clear that no automatic system will ever be able to cluster web pages perfectly. \nIt is mathematically impossible. \nIndeed, no person can cluster his/her own pages unequivocally.\nNo matter how good the system is, there will always be errors.\nBut the question raised here is \nwhether combining topic and time information can represent a significant improvement over using just one or just the other?Is the system “good enough” to be useful? \nOn one hand, given the low rates of bookmark and web history usage, it would be hard for this approach to be worse. \nOn the other, even if it was developed sufficiently to be released as a user system, it might fail in actual adoption.\nWe now live in a world in which we work with many “good enough” systems. \nFor example, Google searches do not always produce the desired information. \nPeople are able to handle their disappointment when a search does not work, and decide whether to pursue it further or not.\nSo basically, the research trails system works well enough in most cases.\n\n
  • While remembering is objective and procedural for machines, remembering is much more complex for people. \nPeople use the traces that they left in the past to actively reconstruct past experiences and build their own narratives around the footprints of the past. \nAs I was able to see my childhood through and around a picture taken 40 years ago, people see and create their own past through and around the trails they leave every second they are on the web. \nThe Research Trails system is an example of a system that does not ‘capture experiences’ \nbut instead provides cues that might trigger different kinds of memories. \nIt is an example of a system that is not only “open to multiple interpretations”, \nbut also designed to encourage multiple interpretations from the onset.\n\n
  • \n
  • Time, Topic and Trawl: stories about how we reach our past

    1. 1. Time, Topic and Trawl:stories about how we reach our past JoonSuk Lee - Two Years Old (1973.4.12 @ Seoul, Korea)
    2. 2. GoogleSummer, 20103 month
    3. 3. Everyday Research“ordinary” people (e.g. not information professionals) engagein what they call “research,” in ways that are distinct fromtraditional models of scholarly and investigative research Pedersen, E.R, Gyllstrom, K. Gu S., and Hong, P.J. Automatic generation of research trails in web history. In Proc. of IUI ’10
    4. 4. hmm...
    5. 5. Bookmarks & Web Histories• 81% (58%) of web visits is revisitation• Bookmarks are used in 2.7% of Web navigation• Web histories are used in 0.2% of Web navigation
    6. 6. Bookmarks & Web Histories• Chronological Ordering• No Context• Tag-Based• Project-Based
    7. 7. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    8. 8. Trip CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes Planning 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    9. 9. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes Paper 2012 Submissionne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    10. 10. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012 Tripmes Planning 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    11. 11. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 Now! DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    12. 12. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    13. 13. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 UN May 11, 2012 May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012
    14. 14. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 create interpretations of users’ web activities while users are NYTimes conducting web activities June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 May 11, 2012 Bookmarks & Web-Histories May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012 UN
    15. 15. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 create interpretations of future users’ web activities while users are NYTimes conducting web activities June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 May 11, 2012 Bookmarks & Web-Histories May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012 UN
    16. 16. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012ne DIS 2012 2012 May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes Research Trails System June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 May 11, 2012 Bookmarks & Web-Histories May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012 UN
    17. 17. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012 create interpretations of users’ pastne 2012 web activities when users need to look back DIS 2012 into their pasts May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes Research Trails System June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 May 11, 2012 Bookmarks & Web-Histories May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012 UN
    18. 18. CSCW 2013 May 25, 2012mes 2012 create interpretations of users’ pastne 2012 web activities when users need to look back DIS 2012 into their pasts May 25, 2012 DIS 2012 June 4, 2012 Trip Advisor CSCW 2013 May 10, 2012 May 26, 2012 NYTimes Research Trails System June 5, 2012 Travel Amazon CSCW 2013 2012 May 15, 2012 May 30, 2012 National Rail Enquiries June 5, 2012 TODAY June 13, 2012 May 11, 2012 Bookmarks & Web-Histories May 18, 2012 May 25, 2012 June 1, 2012 June 8, 2012 June 15, 2012 UN
    19. 19. XHow people conduct their web activities.
    20. 20. How people remembertheir past web activities.
    21. 21. We need to move away from “an obsession with capturingeverything” and to start asking what it means to supporthuman memory and how we can go about designing usefulaids. People recollect, reminisce, retrieve, reflect on thepast and remember past intentions. Sellen & Whittaker : Beyond total capture: a constructive critique of lifelogging, Communications of the ACM, 2010.
    22. 22. The Research Trails System• Time (Activity-Based)• Topic (Semantic)
    23. 23. Missions• Understandings about how people view their past web activities.• Formatively evaluation of the system.
    24. 24. The Study• 11 Participants• Two Interviews per Week for 8 Weeks• Google Web-Histories & Prototype Trails System
    25. 25. Stories...
    26. 26. Difficulties...
    27. 27. Phenomenologically-Situated Take on Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages on two individuals’ webhistories does not necessitate the same interpretation.
    28. 28. Phenomenologically-Situated Take on Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages may entail more thanone interpretation from the same user.
    29. 29. Phenomenologically-Situated Take on Web-BehaviorsThe same set of past web pages could hold differentinterpretations at different times for the same user.
    30. 30. Good Enough Clustering?
    31. 31. Googlepresented at DIS 2012 on 6/13/2012 Thank you. Virginia Tech Joon-Suk Lee joonlee@vt.edu

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