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Doctoral	
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Students	
  

DoctoralNet	
  

Universi3es	
  

Thank	
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  for	
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How You Should Cite
Sources
Harvard, Chicago, and
MLA Styles
There are different styles to reference
sources. In this conference, we will focus on
three of them: Harvard, Chicago, and...
Harvard style is a widely used format to cite sources
across most subjects. Despite its name, it is not tied to
Harvard Un...
Chicago referencing style is very used in the humanities
(especially in literature, history, and the arts). The Chicago
Ma...
The Modern Language Association (MLA) referencing style is
most used in the humanities. It uses a system that consists of
...
Citation
Periodicals
1.  Journal
2.  Newspaper

Books
1.  Printed Book
2.  Edited Book
3.  Ebook
Periodicals (I)
Journal Article
• 

	
  

Harvard basic format

Author’s First (and Year of
Title of
surname, middle)
publ...
Periodicals (II)
Journal Article
Chicago basic format

• 

Author’s First
surname, name.

	
  

“Title of
Article.”

Title...
Periodicals (III)
Journal Article
MLA basic format

• 

Author’s First
surname, name.

	
  

“Title of
Article.”

Title of...
Periodicals (IV)
Newspaper Article
• 

Harvard basic format

Author’s
surname,

First (and
middle
name)
initial.

Year of
...
Periodicals	
  (V)	
  
Newspaper	
  Article	
  
• 

Chicago basic format

Author’s
surname,

First name.

“Title of
Articl...
Periodicals (VI)
Newspaper Article
• 

MLA basic format

Author’s
surname,

First
name.

“Title of
Article.”

Title of
Day...
Books (I)
Printed Book
Harvard basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

	
  	
  

First (and
middle)
name
initial.

Year...
Books (II)
Printed Book
Chicago basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

First
name .

Title of Book.

City of
publicati...
Books (III)
Printed Book
MLA basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

First
Title of Book. City of
Publisher,
name .
pub...
Books (IV)
Edited Book
Harvard basic format

• 

Editor’s
surname,

	
  

	
  	
  

First
(and
middle)
name
initial.

(Ed....
Books (V)
Edited Book
• 

Chicago basic format

Editor’s
surname,

First
name,

ed. or
eds.

Title of
book.

City of
publi...
Books (VI)
Edited Book
• 

MLA basic format

Editor’s
surname,

First
name,

ed. or eds. Title of
book.

City of
Publisher...
Books (VII)
Ebook
Harvard basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

First
(middle)
name
initial.

Year of
publicatio
n.

...
Books (VIII)
Ebook
Chicago basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

First
name.

Title of
Book.

City of
publication:
(i...
Books (IX)
Ebook
MLA basic format

• 

Author’s
surname,

	
  

First
name.

Title of
Book.

City of
publication:
(if know...
Now	
  You	
  Know	
  Basic	
  
Rules	
  for	
  Citing:	
  
	
  
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

Journal articles
Newspaper articles
...
Send	
  us	
  the	
  receipt	
  
and	
  get	
  a	
  free	
  month	
  
of	
  finishing	
  faster	
  -­‐an	
  
$80	
  value	
...
Thanks	
  for	
  Reading	
  
Hope you find this conference useful and
want to meet us soon
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How to Cite Sources Using Harvard, Chicago, and MLA styles

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Citations of journal articles, newspaper information, printed and edited books, and ebooks using Harvard, Chicago, and MLA referencing styles are presented.

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Transcript of "How to Cite Sources Using Harvard, Chicago, and MLA styles"

  1. 1. Doctoral   Doctoral  Students   Students   DoctoralNet   Universi3es   Thank  You  for  Reading  
  2. 2. How You Should Cite Sources Harvard, Chicago, and MLA Styles
  3. 3. There are different styles to reference sources. In this conference, we will focus on three of them: Harvard, Chicago, and MLA.
  4. 4. Harvard style is a widely used format to cite sources across most subjects. Despite its name, it is not tied to Harvard University. In fact, no organization sets its standard and that is why there are different variations of it. That implies that you should choose a variation and use it consistently. For example, some variations use a parenthesis to present the date while others do not.
  5. 5. Chicago referencing style is very used in the humanities (especially in literature, history, and the arts). The Chicago Manual of Style is published by the University of Chicago Press. It includes two basic documentation systems: a) author-date and b) notes and bibliography. In this conference, we will focus on the former.
  6. 6. The Modern Language Association (MLA) referencing style is most used in the humanities. It uses a system that consists of two parts: citations in text and the works cited list that is included at the end of the paper. What makes it different from other styles is that citations in the text point out (using numbers) to the works cited list.
  7. 7. Citation Periodicals 1.  Journal 2.  Newspaper Books 1.  Printed Book 2.  Edited Book 3.  Ebook
  8. 8. Periodicals (I) Journal Article •    Harvard basic format Author’s First (and Year of Title of surname, middle) publication. article. name     initial. Title of Journal, Volume number (Issue or Page(s). part Preceded number), by p. or pp. Burik, S. 2009. Opening philosophy to the world: Derrida and education in philosophy. Educational Theory, 59(3), pp.297-312.
  9. 9. Periodicals (II) Journal Article Chicago basic format •  Author’s First surname, name.   “Title of Article.” Title of Journal Volume number, no. issue (Year): Page(s).     Burik, Samuel. “Opening Philosophy to the World: Derrida and Education in Philosophy.” Educational Theory 59, no. 3 (2009): 297-312. Be aware that there is no punctuation between the journal title and the volume number. If there are two or more authors, reverse the order of “surname, first name” from the second author on. Use the word “and” before the last author.
  10. 10. Periodicals (III) Journal Article MLA basic format •  Author’s First surname, name.   “Title of Article.” Title of Journal Volume number. Issue (Year): Page(s). Print     Burik, Samuel. “Opening Philosophy to the World: Derrida and Education in Philosophy.” Educational Theory 59. 3 (2009): 297-312. Print No punctuation between the journal title and the volume number.
  11. 11. Periodicals (IV) Newspaper Article •  Harvard basic format Author’s surname, First (and middle name) initial. Year of publication. Title of article. Title of Newspaper, Day and month. Page(s). Preceded by p. or pp. Applebaum, B. 2013. Fed looks for other way to aid economy. The New York Times, 21 November. p. B1. Online newspaper: Follow the basic format and add “Retrieved from http://….”
  12. 12. Periodicals  (V)   Newspaper  Article   •  Chicago basic format Author’s surname, First name. “Title of Article.” Title of Newspaper, Month, day, and year. Applebaum, Bert. “Fed Looks for Other Way to Aid Economy.” The New York Times, November 21, 2013. •  Online newspaper: Follow the basic format and add the URL •  Add an access date only if required. In that case, use the word “accessed” •  If there are two or more authors, reverse the order of “surname, first name” from the second author on. Use the word “and” before the last author.
  13. 13. Periodicals (VI) Newspaper Article •  MLA basic format Author’s surname, First name. “Title of Article.” Title of Day, Page Newspaper, abbreviated number. month, year: Print Applebaum, Bert. “Fed Looks for Other Way to Aid Economy.” The New York Times, 21 Nov, 2013: B1. Print •  Online newspaper: Follow the basic format, write “web” instead of “print”, and immediately add the access date following the dd/mm/year format •  If there are two or more authors, reverse the order of “surname, first name” from the second author on. Use the word “and” before the last author.
  14. 14. Books (I) Printed Book Harvard basic format •  Author’s surname,       First (and middle) name initial. Year of publication. Title of book. City of publication, State initials or country (if relevant): Publisher. Sullo, B. 2007. Activating the desire to learn. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Sommers, C. and Sommers, F. 2004. Vice & virtue in everyday life: Introductory readings in ethics. London, UK: Thomson.
  15. 15. Books (II) Printed Book Chicago basic format •  Author’s surname,   First name . Title of Book. City of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.     Sullo, Bob. Activating the Desire to Learn. Alexandria: ASCD, 2007. Sommers, Christina and Fred Sommers. Vice & Virtue in Everyday Life: Introductory Readings in Ethics. London: Thomson, 2004.
  16. 16. Books (III) Printed Book MLA basic format •  Author’s surname,   First Title of Book. City of Publisher, name . publication: Year of publication. Print.     Sullo, Bob. Activating the Desire to Learn. Alexandria: ASCD, 2007. Print. Sommers, Christina and Fred Sommers. Vice & Virtue in Everyday Life: Introductory Readings in Ethics. London: Thomson, 2004. Print.
  17. 17. Books (IV) Edited Book Harvard basic format •  Editor’s surname,       First (and middle) name initial. (Ed.). or (Eds.). Year of publication. Title of book. City of publication. State abbreviation: Publisher. Noll, J.W. (Ed.). 2011. Taking sides: Clashing views on educational issues. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  18. 18. Books (V) Edited Book •  Chicago basic format Editor’s surname, First name, ed. or eds. Title of book. City of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.     Noll, James, ed. Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Educational Issues. New York: McGraw   Hill, 2011.
  19. 19. Books (VI) Edited Book •  MLA basic format Editor’s surname, First name, ed. or eds. Title of book. City of Publisher, publication: Year of publication. Print.     Noll, James, ed. Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Educational Issues. New York: McGraw   Hill, 2011. Print.
  20. 20. Books (VII) Ebook Harvard basic format •  Author’s surname,   First (middle) name initial. Year of publicatio n. Title of book. [Ebook] City of publicatio n: (if known) Publisher. Available at: URL [access date] day month year     Denscombe, M. 2010. The good research guide: For small social research projects. [Ebook] New York: McGraw-Hill. Available at: http://books.google.com.pa/books/about/The_Good_Research_Guide.html? id=I6rRC0oyotkC&redir_esc=y [04 December 2013]
  21. 21. Books (VIII) Ebook Chicago basic format •  Author’s surname,   First name. Title of Book. City of publication: (if known) Publisher, Year of publication. Type of edition or “Accessed date. URL”     Denscombe, Martyn. The Good Research Guide: For Small Social Research Projects. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010. Accessed December 04, 2013. http://books.google.com.pa/books/about/The_Good_Research_Guide.html? id=I6rRC0oyotkC&redir_esc=y Sullo, Bob. Activating the Desire to Learn. Alexandria: ASCD, 2007. Kindle edition.
  22. 22. Books (IX) Ebook MLA basic format •  Author’s surname,   First name. Title of Book. City of publication: (if known) Publisher, Year of publication. Database. Ebook or Web. Access date. Day month (abbreviation) year     Denscombe, Martyn. The Good Research Guide: For Small Social Research Projects. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010. Google Book Search. Web. 04 Dec. 2013.
  23. 23. Now  You  Know  Basic   Rules  for  Citing:     1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  Journal articles Newspaper articles Printed books Edited books Ebooks Using Harvard, Chicago, and MLA styles.
  24. 24. Send  us  the  receipt   and  get  a  free  month   of  finishing  faster  -­‐an   $80  value   Wri3ng  Your  Doctoral   Disserta3on  or  Thesis   Faster:  A  Proven  Map   to  Success Upcoming  News/ Events   NOTE:  Always  Sign  in   First!   E  –  Books  for  Christmas  –  give  other  doc  student  a   smile  –  and  they  are  free.       h:p://www.doctoralnet.com/professors-­‐blog.html Welcome our new phone responsive site! Conferences: https://www.bigmarker.com/communities/ doctoralnet/conferences •    Sun 8th – Hands on testing new DocNet Features + Focus Group
  25. 25. Thanks  for  Reading   Hope you find this conference useful and want to meet us soon
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