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A workshop session for students new to the Open University.

A workshop session for students new to the Open University.

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  • Icebreaker. Why were these people so good at what they did? Think about this. Share your response with the group. Think about another person or people who have excelled in their field. What has contributed to their success? What sort of language dominated your discussion? Talent? Genius? Fate? Luck? Hard work? Did you all agree?
  • How did your answers and discussion differ from that you had about Ali and Pele’s success? Was there a feeling that being clever is a talent you are born with? Was your evidence predicated on formal qualifications, or other people’s opinions of your intelligence, or a comparative? Did you create a list of qualifications, or exam successes, your IQ, your membership of Mensa. You might have made some observations on how you compare with colleagues or friends, or how far you have progressed within a certain organisation, or the recognition you receive in your professional field. Is there any evidence that counters your interpretation that suggests you are smarter or dumber than you think you really are? How does this make you feel? How did you feel about noting down the things that challenge your view of your intelligence? Do you feel angry or embarrassed that there are or were events in your life that could cast doubt over your perception of your own ability? Or, do you feel comfortable with the possibility that you could be smarter, or that you aren't as smart as other people think you are? Thinking of your answer to the final question – do you think that intelligence is something that you are born with (innate) that cannot be changed? Or, do you perceive it as something that can be developed with hard work, and something that you can grow?
  • The idea of mindsets was developed by Professor Carol Dweck of Standford University in the 1980s. She explored how perceptions of intelligence influence behaviour, including the choices we make in educational settings. Her study of secondary school pupils revealed two distinct sets of perceptions, which she termed ‘mindsets’. So, let’s think about our mindsets:
  • What difference does mindset make? Mindset theory developed by Carol Dweck. People can be placed on a continuum of belief according to their implicit views on where ability comes from. Belief that success is based on innate ability shows a fixed mindset. Belief that success is based on hard work and learning shows a growth mindset. These mindsets can determine: Our attitude to failure, Our resilience and ability to persevere, Our potential for positive change.
  • Fixed Mindsets: Pupils with a fixed mindset regarded intelligence as innate and unchangeable, fixed from birth. They tended to choose courses and assignments that seemed like safe options worry about the possibility of failure be concerned that other people would see them as less intelligent find it difficult to ask for help or feedback.
  • Pupils with a growth mindset believed that intelligence could be cultivated and developed through effort and persistence. These pupils tended to actively seek out new challenges welcome opportunities for intellectual development respond positively to feedback feel comfortable in asking for help.
  • Metaphors Think of a metaphor for yourself when you are learning really well. Draw a picture to represent your metaphor. Explain your metaphor to the person next to you. What does your metaphor tell you about your beliefs about you as a learner? Return to your positive learning experience which you wrote down at the beginning of the session. Bearing this experience in mind, and the emotions that it generated, create a metaphor for yourself when you are learning really well. Draw a picture that captures that experience, and which represents you and your emotional state when you are learning really well.
  • Concrete Experience: doing/having an experience Reflective Experience: reviewing/reflecting on the experience. Intuitive initial thoughts. Journal keeping. TMA feedback. Abstract Conceptualisation: concluding/learning from the experience ‘What would you do differently next time? Brings together theories and analysis of past actions. Allows us to come to conclusions about our practice. Active Experimentation: planning/trying out what you have learned Take those conclusions to plan changes. Active experimentation begins the cycle again. Back to Concrete Experience.
  • It’s worth thinking ahead to organise your time and reflect on why, what, how and when to prioritise. While preparing assignments, for example – reflection can help you to define immediate goals and then devise strategies to achieve them. Procrastination, the art of putting things off until they absolutely have to be done, is both a cause and a symptom of anxiety. It can lead you to miss deadlines or fall behind with your study schedule and can severely affect your confidence. Reflecting on how, when, where and why you procrastinate can help you to recognise and challenge your routines and habits. How often do you make assumptions about your ability to study by using sentences that start with: ” I’m no good at …” ” I’ve always been terrible at…” ” I’ll never be able to…” These beliefs may echo negative comments from teachers, parents, employers or peers, or you may just believe them to be irrefutably true. They can make it harder for you to study because they undermine your confidence and motivation. But by reflecting on the assumptions you make about yourself you can make positive changes in your study routines

Transcript

  • 1. Becoming an OU Student Crawley, 24 th April, 2010
  • 2. Good times!
    • Write down one time when something went really well for you.
    • Think about how it made you feel.
    • Write down how it made you feel.
  • 3. Aims of Session
    • Shake off the nOUbie colliewobbles
    • Think about your success
      • positive learning states
      • time and time management
    • Tips and tricks to help you be your own best friend
  • 4. This session . . .
    • For this session to be really useful for you it will be like what?
    • For the session to be like that, you will need to be like what?
    • For you to be like that and for the session to go jusdt the way you would like it to, what support and resources do you need?
  • 5. Mindset
    • Why was he good at football?
    Why was he good at boxing?
  • 6. How clever are you?
    • On a scale of 1 to 10, when 10 is the cleverest person you can think of, how clever are you?
    • What are your sources of evidence?
    • Have you always been this clever?
  • 7. Mindset: a quick quiz
    • Which of these two statements would you most agree with:
    • Intelligence is something you are born with (or without).
    • Intelligence can be cultivated and developed through effort and persistence.
  • 8. Mindsets
    • You get a low mark for an assignment, do you think:
    • It proves I’m not capable of doing this.
    • I picked the wrong subject
    • I need to work harder
  • 9. Mindsets
    • You get a high mark for an assignment, are you?
    • Worried that you won’t be able to maintain such a high standard in the future?
    • Reassured that your grade reflects the effort you have put into your work.
  • 10. Mindsets
    • You will work really hard on your course because:
    • You know that how hard you work makes a difference to your grades
    • You know that other people will think less of you if you get a low mark.
  • 11. What difference does mindset make?
    • Mindset theory developed by Carol Dweck.
    • People can be placed on a continuum of belief according to their implicit views on where ability comes from:
      • belief that success is based on innate ability shows a fixed mindset.
      • belief that success is based on hard work and learning shows a growth mindset.
    • These mindsets can determine:
      • our attitude to failure,
      • our resilience and ability to persevere,
      • our potential for positive change
  • 12. The Fixed Mindset:
    • Pupils with a fixed mindset regarded intelligence as innate and unchangeable, fixed from birth. They tended to
    • choose courses and assignments that seemed like safe options
    • worry about the possibility of failure
    • be concerned that other people would see them as less intelligent
    • find it difficult to ask for help or feedback.
  • 13. Growth Mindset:
    • Pupils with a growth mindset believed that intelligence could be cultivated and developed through effort and persistence. These pupils tended to:
    • actively seek out new challenges
    • welcome opportunities for intellectual development
    • respond positively to feedback
    • feel comfortable in asking for help.
  • 14. Metaphors . . .
    • Think of a metaphor for yourself when you are learning really well.
    • Draw a picture to represent your metaphor.
    • What does your metaphor tell you about your beliefs about you as a learner?
  • 15. Reflecting on your learning needs
    • What kinds of environment support you to be your best? Which hinder you?
    • Which activities help you to learn? Which make it hard for you to learn?
    • What skills come naturally to you? Which would you like to develop?
    • What’s important about learning?
    • What do you believe about yourself as a learner?
    • Do you have any negative beliefs about yourself as a learner? Is there anything that you can’t do?
    • When you’re learning really well what’s your purpose? What’s it all for?
  • 16. Setting Goals
    • Long term Goals
    • What do you want to achieve by the end of your time at the OU?
    • First 6 weeks
    • What do you want to achieve in your first six weeks?
    • What will you need to make these goals happen?
    • What might you need to change or do differently?
    • Where will you need to focus?
    • Where will you get the resources?
    • What are you going to have to do?
  • 17. Homework.
    • Write down one specific thing that you will be practicing to improve your learning?
    • You will know you’re achieving your goal when . . .
    • You will know you’re not achieving your goal when . . .
  • 18. Time and Time Management
    • How do you think about your past and your future?
    • Where in the future are your goals?
    • Your model of time:
      • Thinking about the past:
        • Whereabouts is it? Does it have a direction? Size? Shape? What kind of past is it? Can you point to it?
      • Thinking about the future:
        • Whereabouts is the future? Does it have a size or shape? Point to it?
  • 19. Reflecting on Time and Time Management
    • Think of a time when you used time well.
    • Think of a time when you used time poorly.
    • What are the key differences:
      • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
      • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
      • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    • What do you conclude from this?
  • 20. Reflection
    • What is reflection?
    • Why should we reflect?
    • How to become a reflective learner.
  • 21. Kolb’s Learning Cycle Concrete Experience Reflective Observation Active Experimentation Abstract Conceptualisation Reflective Observation
  • 22. Why should we reflect?
    • Planning and prioritising
    • Setting and achieving goals
    • Dealing with procrastination and anxiety
    • Recognising and overcoming self-limiting beliefs
    • Making effective use of available support
  • 23. Keeping a learning journal:
    • Blogging/a learning journal helps you to keep a record which is
      • useful to you
      • a cue to memory
      • honestly written
      • evaluates key aspects of your work
      • a tool to help you to identify recurring themes
      • key to developing a plan of action to take
      • an appraisal of that action.
  • 24. Maximising your study time
    • Plan
    • Prioritise
    • Pareto principle – 80% marks from 20% effort
    • 4 Ds
      • Do it
      • Dump it
      • Delegate it
      • Do it less well
  • 25. Jennie Osborn Learner Support: Telephone: 01342 322642 Email: south-east@open.ac.uk