Springboard Series Spain 2011 - Miguel Hernandez

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Springboard Series Spain 2011 - Miguel Hernandez -Compatibilidad de applicaciones

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  • The combination of these technology developments means more options for the way client computing capabilities can be delivered to users. The previous choice of thick versus thin has been expanded by an extra application delivery model (streaming) and new possibilities for delivering the (previously fixed) OS bubble to the user. The result is a matrix of 10 architectural choices, nine of which can be applied on an application-by-application basis. Successful use of these architectural options will depend on appropriate matching to user requirements (see "Segmenting Users for Mobile and Client Computing"): Local desktop OS/distributed applications — Applications are installed and run in an OS that is installed locally on the client computing device. This is the traditional thick-client model that dominates PC deployments. Local desktop OS/streamed applications — Applications are streamed to an OS that is installed locally on the client computing device (for local execution). This approach can be used to provide access to an application from multiple PCs for a single license fee or to centralize some aspects of application management in a distributed computing environment. Streamed applications can be cached locally for faster loading, but will check for updates each time they are launched, which can simplify application maintenance and patching for intermittently connected users. Local desktop OS/hosted applications — Server/Web-based applications are accessed by the user from an OS bubble installed locally on his or her client computing device. This is already a mainstream option, used for at least some applications by most large organizations. Because the application and associated data are never present on the PC, this approach minimizes the security and management profile of the application on the user's device. This is a preferred option for many applications dealing with sensitive, shared corporate information resources, such as HR or finance. Streamed desktop OS/distributed applications — Applications are installed in an OS bubble that is streamed to the user on-demand. The full user environment is stored centrally and (typically) loaded onto a thin-client device when required. This is a niche option that is useful for running distributed applications that are sensitive to network latency issues, while avoiding any permanent presence of applications and data on user devices. Streamed desktop OS/streamed applications — Applications are streamed into an OS bubble that is streamed to the user (not permanently resident on his or her client computing device). Although technically viable (and used by some organizations to support users with changeable application requirements moving between different client computing devices), this method is not recommended because of the scope for additional management complexity. Streamed desktop OS/hosted applications — Server/Web-based applications are accessed by the user from an OS bubble that is streamed to the user on-demand. Although fully viable, usage presupposes that distributed applications also will be present in the OS bubble (it will be used in combination with the streamed desktop OS/distributed application model). If only server/Web-based applications are used, then the streamed desktop OS is not required. Hosted desktop OS/distributed applications — Applications are installed and run in an OS bubble that is installed in the data center and accessed by the user from a remote client computing device. This method provides remote access to a full PC environment, without the requirement to re-engineer all the applications for Web/server-based delivery. The desktop OS bubbles can be dedicated to specific users or "pooled" — loaded and personalized as users log on. Typical deployment scenarios include support for offshore or outsourced job functions, and secure access to corporate resources for home workers. Because of the separation of the application execution and presentation layers, network latency can affect performance. Hosted desktop OS/streamed applications — Applications are streamed to an OS bubble that is installed in the data center and accessed by the user from a remote client computing device. This method appeals to organizations that deploy HVDs and wish to rationalize image storage requirements. Hosted desktop OS/hosted applications — Server/Web-based applications are accessed by the user from an OS bubble that is installed in the data center and accessed by the user from a remote client computing device. This method appeals to organizations that deploy HVDs and wish to rationalize image storage requirements. Publication Date: 18 February 2010/ID Number: G00174444 Page 7 of 9 © 2010 Gartner, Inc. and/or its Affiliates. All Rights Reserved. No desktop OS/hosted applications — The traditional thin-client model is the preferred model when all applications are hosted.
  • Updates to virtual images can be done in one of two ways:Admin updates the master image, and deliver the differences to all end users.This is a very easy process to manage, and keep all machines on the same base level.However, all data and settings that are saved in the virtual image will be lost, so when using this setup you should consider network share and roaming profiles.2. VMs can become standard, domain-managed machines, and be updated using any software delivery mechanism used for desktop in the organization
  • White Papershttp://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/rds-vdi.aspx
  • Springboard Series Spain 2011 - Miguel Hernandez

    1. 1. Todo lo quequisiste saber sobre la compatibilidad de aplicaciones<br />Miguel Hernández<br />Consultor Pre-venta I.T. / V-TSP Microsoft<br />Microsoft MVP / MCTS Virtualization / SBS / StepMember<br />MCITP Virtualization / MCTS SBS / MCTS SCVMM<br />Itilfoundations v3<br />CSSA Sonicwall<br />mhernandez@zerkana.com<br />http://undercpd.blogspot.com<br />
    2. 2. Evolución de la virtualización en Desktop<br />Windows Next + Native VHD<br />(2012+)<br />Windows Vista / 7 + App-V<br />(Hoy)<br />Windows XP / Vista<br />Datos de usuario<br />Datos de usuario<br />Datos de usuario<br />Conf. Usuario<br />Conf. Usuario<br />Conf. Usuario<br />Aplicaciones<br />Aplicaciones<br />Aplicaciones<br />OS<br />OS<br />OS<br />Hardware<br />Hardware<br />Hardware<br />Adopción de la virtualización en el puesto de trabajo<br />
    3. 3. 10 Arquitecturasposibles<br />* Source – Gartner Feb 2010<br />
    4. 4. ?<br />
    5. 5.
    6. 6.
    7. 7. Cambios en Windows 7 / Windows Vista<br />El “famoso” User Acount Control<br />Los administradores son “Standard User”<br />
    8. 8. MED-V acelera el despliegue de Windows 7<br />Muchas<br />Empieza<br />el <br />trabajo<br />Número<br />de<br />aplicaciones<br /><ul><li>IE 6 Dependencias
    9. 9. Legadosinternos
    10. 10. apps
    11. 11. Programadores...</li></ul>Actualización<br />Pocas<br />Fácil<br />Difícil<br />Dificultad<br />Afrontar las incompatibilidades<br />
    12. 12. ?<br />
    13. 13. Soluciones ante la incompatibilidad de aplicacionesen Windows 7<br />Existente en lasversiones, Profesional, Ultimate y Enterprise.<br />Unamáquina virtual con Windows XP SP3 (32bit) preconfigurada<br />Esfácilinstalartusaplicaciones en la VM Xp Sp3 y resultafácilejecutarlas en Windows 7<br />Totalmenteintegrado en Windows 7<br />Diseñadoparapequeñasempresas.<br />
    14. 14. DEMOXp Mode Demo<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. MED-V es parte de la subscripción MDOP<br />
    17. 17. Incompatibilidades<br />100%<br />LOB Apps<br />Aplicaciones<br />modificadas<br />+<br />+<br />Trabaja con MED-V en Windows 7<br />Trabajodiario<br />Act.<br />Trabaja con Windows 7<br />0%<br />Migración “Timeline”<br />Inicio<br />Finalización<br />
    18. 18. Soluciones ante la incompatibilidad de aplicacionesen Windows 7<br />Despliegaordenádamenteinstancias XP en el dominio.<br />Provisionaaplicaciones en los equipos.<br />Redirigeaplicaciones web a IE6<br />Monitoriza y ayuda a desplegarcriterios de solución a problemas<br />
    19. 19. DEMOMED-V 2.0 Workspace Packager<br />
    20. 20. Arquitectura<br />
    21. 21. MED-V v1 Arquitectura<br />Distribución de software<br />
    22. 22. ¿Como se actualiza y parchea el entorno?<br />Despliegue gracias a Tim Transfer<br />Politicas de dominio<br />Actualización de “master” a través de soportesfísicos y/o red<br />WSUS, SCCM, etc.<br />
    23. 23. DEMOMED-V Experiencia de usuario<br />
    24. 24. Elección de solución<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />MED-V es la solución enterprise ante la incompatibilidad de aplicaciones<br />
    25. 25. Remote Desktop Services<br />
    26. 26. Terminal Server vs Remote Desktop<br />Problemáticacomún en TS 2000/2003:<br /><ul><li>Problema con la impresión.
    27. 27. Optimización en el uso del ancho de banda.
    28. 28. Mucho esfuerzoasegurando el escritorio del servidor.
    29. 29. Licenciasasociadas a usuarios/dispositivo.
    30. 30. Diferentesescritoriospara el usuario.
    31. 31. No integración con escritorio de cliente.
    32. 32. Publicación en internet de puerto 3389.
    33. 33. Petición de credenciales en remoto.
    34. 34. Validación sin cifrar.</li></ul>App<br />OS<br />Virtualización de la Presentación<br />
    35. 35. DEMORemote Desktop Services<br />
    36. 36. Remote Desktop Virtualization Host<br />Ofrece conexión a escritorios virtuales utilizando las vías conocidas de RDS.<br />RD Gateway<br />Puerto 3389<br />Seguridad SSL<br />Puerto 443<br />Seguridad SSL<br />Remote App<br />RD Session Broker<br />Hyper-v RDVH<br />Pool Windows 7<br />
    37. 37. Integración de Remote App en equipo cliente<br /><ul><li>Asociación de extensiones de archivos
    38. 38. Despliegue de .msi a través de DirectorioActivo
    39. 39. Etc.</li></li></ul><li>
    40. 40.  <br /> <br />Gracias<br />Miguel Hernández<br />Consultor Pre-venta I.T. / V-TSP Microsoft<br />Microsoft MVP / MCTS Virtualization / SBS / StepMember<br />MCITP Virtualization / MCTS SBS / MCTS SCVMM<br />Itilfoundations v3<br />CSSA Sonicwall<br />mhernandez@zerkana.com<br />http://undercpd.blogspot.com <br />

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