What Drives You?

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A new theory on human needs as explained through 222 Google SketchUp screenshots.

Note: Slideshare gutted the autmation and turned it into 313 slides you have to move through yourself. The 222 page PDF is available at my DeviantArt page, here: http://dniolet.deviantart.com.

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  • What Drives You?

    1. 1. What Drives You? The Reasons Why You Do What You Doin 222 automated Google SketchUp Screenshots
    2. 2. Abraham Maslow suggested that we all possess a classifiable hierarchy of needs.
    3. 3. Abraham Maslow suggested that we all possess a classifiable hierarchy of needs.
    4. 4. Abraham Maslow suggested that we all possess a classifiable hierarchy of needs.
    5. 5. While overall his theory seems to hold, in practice the structure seems TOO structured.
    6. 6. While overall his theory seems to hold, in practice the structure seems TOO structured.
    7. 7. While overall his theory seems to hold, in practice the structure seems TOO structured.
    8. 8. You can only be in one place at a time.
    9. 9. You can only be in one place at a time.
    10. 10. You can only be in one place at a time.
    11. 11. And you can only go up.
    12. 12. And you can only go up.
    13. 13. Manfred Max Neef suggested a much less structured version of a classifiable system of needs.
    14. 14. His theory differs from Maslow’s in that he doesn’t believe there is a hierarchy built into the needs.
    15. 15. His theory differs from Maslow’s in that he doesn’t believe there is a hierarchy built into the needs.
    16. 16. His theory differs from Maslow’s in that he doesn’t believe there is a hierarchy built into the needs.
    17. 17. His theory differs from Maslow’s in that he doesn’t believe there is a hierarchy built into the needs.
    18. 18. His theory differs from Maslow’s in that he doesn’t believe there is a hierarchy built into the needs.
    19. 19. Instead, needs are interactive and simultaneously vying for attention.
    20. 20. Instead, needs are interactive and simultaneously vying for attention.
    21. 21. Instead, needs are interactive and simultaneously vying for attention.
    22. 22. Instead, needs are interactive and simultaneously vying for attention.
    23. 23. That means you can be in more than one place at a time.
    24. 24. That means you can be in more than one place at a time.
    25. 25. That means you can be in more than one place at a time.
    26. 26. That means you can be in more than one place at a time.
    27. 27. But subsistence generally remains primary.
    28. 28. That’s no spaceship, but climb up there anyway and get a feel for things.
    29. 29. That’s no spaceship, but climb up there anyway and get a feel for things.
    30. 30. That’s no spaceship, but climb up there anyway and get a feel for things.
    31. 31. Imperative Needs spurn all other needs. Theyall seek to avoid suffering in the Natural Needs,which will be explained next.
    32. 32. Imperative Needs spurn all other needs. Theyall seek to avoid suffering in the Natural Needs,which will be explained next.
    33. 33. Imperative Needs spurn all other needs. Theyall seek to avoid suffering in the Natural Needs,which will be explained next.
    34. 34. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    35. 35. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    36. 36. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    37. 37. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    38. 38. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    39. 39. Natural Needs come directly from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs;however, there are some differences. Firstly, Maslow proposed thatthere were 8 steps in his needs pyramid. He made 4 pairs from the8. The Natural Needs in this Needs Paradigm are the first member ineach of those pairs. The second members are the ConfirmationNeeds, which will be explained next. Secondly, whereas Maslowspyramid entailed that the needs arose in a succession, this NeedsParadigm has all the needs beginning at once; however, the needsare not entirely without structure/order, as Max Neef would havethem with his nebulous of simultaneously competing needs. The hierarchy built within this Needs Paradigm is based on precedence. The needs on top take precedence over those below and progress to the next level is hindered if needs in a previous Natural Need level have not been well met.
    40. 40. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    41. 41. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    42. 42. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    43. 43. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    44. 44. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    45. 45. Confirmation Needs are the second member in Maslows pairs. They servetwo purposes: 1) to secure the means by which we were able to meet ourNatural Needs, and 2) to help us synthesize all that we experienced at eachNatural Need level so as to prepare us to move to the next level of NaturalNeeds. Out of the Confirmation Needs come Response Needs. It is at thesepoints that most of humanity’s troubles lay because there exist crossroads,and more often than not, humans choose the path that leads to continuedsuffering, which is precisely what we are trying to avoid from the start.
    46. 46. We need to feel like we are progressing through life. Progress requires action. Response Needs are the manner in which we ATTEMPT to progress through life, and thus the Needs Paradigm. Again, Response Needs are prompted by our Confirmation Needs, which seek to secure and confirm our ability to meet our Natural Needs.Unlike Positive Responses, Negative Responses occur on thepath toward Fear and/or Selfishness. Actions will seem like Positive actions include those that occur on the pathprogress to the individual, but will in fact be greatly toward Fearlessness and/or Selflessness. They assisthindering their progress through this Needs Paradigm and greatly in being able to maneuver up this Needsmore often than not lead to a vicious cycle of pain/suffering. Paradigm and (possibly more importantly), have the potential to help others through the paradigm as well.There is little help being offered to others by individuals in The more of us that are free from the cycle of pain/this cycle, quite the opposite. More to come on this soon. suffering, the less pain/suffering there is to avoid. More to come on this soon.
    47. 47. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    48. 48. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    49. 49. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    50. 50. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    51. 51. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    52. 52. Capstone Needs are the rewards from having achieved Natural andConfirmation Needs regardless of the manner in which we chose torespond to meeting those needs. They exist in a sort of cloudalmost outside of this Needs Paradigm. It is a place to break awayfor a time and indulge ourselves. Most people treat the CapstoneNeeds as the ultimate goal in maneuvering through life, and thusthis Needs Paradigm, and do everything they can to remain there.If nothing else is able to make such individuals wake up to reality,then our Obligations, which you will see next, are always there to bea ceiling and remind us of more important needs.
    53. 53. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    54. 54. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    55. 55. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    56. 56. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    57. 57. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    58. 58. Like it or not, Obligations are needs. And they actually serve a purpose.They act as a ceiling over our Capstone Needs, reminding us that we cannotindulge ourselves indefinitely.
    59. 59. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    60. 60. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    61. 61. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    62. 62. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    63. 63. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    64. 64. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by whicheveryone is supposed to be able to better meet theirneeds, secure those already satisfied, protect themeans by which the needs are satisfied and gainconfirmation that their needs are being satisfied.Society begins with the family.
    65. 65. What’s important to understand, and why societal formationis even in this Needs Paradigm is because of the fact thatsocieties move through this Needs Paradigm in much thesame way as people - societies are made up of people afterall - falling into the same cycle of pain/suffering. Societies are designed to be an apparatus by which everyone is supposed to be able to better meet their needs, secure those already satisfied, protect the means by which the needs are satisfied and gain confirmation that their needs are being satisfied. Society begins with the family. The next slide will be a good slide for printing or saving the Needs Paradigm. Unfortunately, the descriptions of each category of needs would not fit in the graphic.
    66. 66. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    67. 67. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    68. 68. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    69. 69. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    70. 70. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    71. 71. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    72. 72. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    73. 73. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    74. 74. Okay, so that’s the Human Needs Paradigm.Now what’s the Human Response Matrix all about?
    75. 75. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    76. 76. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    77. 77. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    78. 78. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    79. 79. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    80. 80. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    81. 81. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    82. 82. Well, follow me and I’ll show you. Oh, you’re already there.
    83. 83. We learn to avoid pain very early in life,
    84. 84. We learn to avoid pain very early in life,
    85. 85. and to seek comfort.
    86. 86. and to seek comfort.
    87. 87. So, it could be said that life is sensations. Those sensations cause us to find a comfortable spot on an axis between Fearful and Fearless.
    88. 88. So, it could be said that life is sensations. Those sensations cause us to find a comfortable spot on an axis between Fearful and Fearless.
    89. 89. So, it could be said that life is sensations. Those sensations cause us to find a comfortable spot on an axis between Fearful and Fearless.
    90. 90. We readily perceive ourselves, but have a difficult time perceiving all else.
    91. 91. We readily perceive ourselves, but have a difficult time perceiving all else.
    92. 92. We readily perceive ourselves, but have a difficult time perceiving all else.
    93. 93. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    94. 94. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    95. 95. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    96. 96. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    97. 97. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    98. 98. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    99. 99. We end up with a simple set of axes. But there is, of course, another axis. Let’s get a look at this thing from another angle.
    100. 100. There it is. But what aspect of life creates it?
    101. 101. There it is. But what aspect of life creates it?
    102. 102. There it is. But what aspect of life creates it?
    103. 103. Information creates it, not just information alone, but our ability to synthesize all the information that comes at us.
    104. 104. Information creates it, not just information alone, but our ability to synthesize all the information that comes at us.
    105. 105. Information creates it, not just information alone, but our ability to synthesize all the information that comes at us.
    106. 106. The 3rd axis is largely determined by factors that are beyond our control, but not ENTIRELY! Those factors include, but are not limited to: genetics, socioeconomics, The variety of information that comes solar flares. at us is vast. It is not enough to merely understand correctly what the information entails, but an ability and willingness to apply it to the various situations in which we find ourselves - from perceiving a friends emotional state to recognizing inner hubris. Likewise, what is important on this axis is our ability to establish truth for ourselves and abide by that truth. It can also concern how close we come to objective truth, but again, we’ll not open that can of worms.
    107. 107. Those factors include, but are notlimited to: genetics, socioeconomics, The variety of information that comessolar flares. at us is vast. It is not enough to merely understand correctly what the information entails, but an ability and willingness to apply it to the various situations in which we find ourselves - from perceiving a friends emotional state to recognizing inner hubris. Likewise, what is important on this axis is our ability to establish truth for ourselves and abide by that truth. It can also concern how close we come to objective truth, but again, we’ll not open that can of worms.
    108. 108. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    109. 109. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    110. 110. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    111. 111. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    112. 112. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    113. 113. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    114. 114. With these axes in place, the Matrix begins to naturally form.
    115. 115. Let’s clean this up to make it easier to see.
    116. 116. Let’s clean this up to make it easier to see.
    117. 117. The Human ResponseMatrix is made up of 8 Quadrants.We’ll examine each one next. But first it should be noted up front that the chosen viewing angle of this Matrix was intentional, as you’ll soon notice. It should also be noted that the very center of the Matrix is the point of “average” for all of the axes.
    118. 118. The Childish Quadrant. Childish because it is the quadrant created by the traits: Fearful, Selfish, and Incapable. Individuals in this quadrant are just as its name describes. It is the quadrant that is closest to us in this view because it is the quadrant in which we are all born and too often do not climb out of.
    119. 119. The Exemplary Quadrant. Exemplary because it is the quadrant created by the traits: Fearless, Selfless, and Capable. Individuals in this quadrant are pillars amongst us. It is the quadrant farthest away in this view because it is so rarely occupied.
    120. 120. The Strengthened Quadrant Strengthened because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearless, Selfish, and Capable. Individuals in this quadrant are looking out for themselves and doing so very well, at least, so it would appear. The important thing that separates them from other quadrants is that their actions are not our of fear.
    121. 121. The Weakened Quadrant Weakened because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearful, Selfless, and Incapable. Individuals in this quadrant are dealing with some heavy matters, acting out of fear, but are not taking it out on others.
    122. 122. The Cautious Quadrant Cautious because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearful, Selfless, and Capable. Individuals in this quadrant are best known for their healthy pessimism and are willing to let others in on it.
    123. 123. The Admirable Quadrant Admirable because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearless, Selfless, and Incapable. Individuals in this quadrant are best known for their optimism, and sometimes, ignorant blissfulness.
    124. 124. The Deplorable Quadrant Deplorable because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearful, Selfish, and Capable. Individuals in this quadrant are fully aware of that which provokes their actions and the consequences of those actions, but are blinded by self-preservation too much to care. The world’s worst characters reside in this quadrant.
    125. 125. The Reckless Quadrant Reckless because it is a mixture of the traits: Fearless, Selfish, and Incapable. Individuals in this quadrant are oblivious to the pain/suffering their actions bring on others and themselves.
    126. 126. Revealing The Realm Each pair of axes creates a natural area of likelihood wherein responses would reside. For instance, as you can see here, if someone is Incapable at synthesizing information, they are MORE likely to be Fearful. We’ll find this area for each pair next.
    127. 127. Revealing The Realm
    128. 128. Revealing The Realm If someone is Capable at synthesizing information, they are MORE likely to be Fearless.
    129. 129. Revealing The Realm
    130. 130. Revealing The Realm If someone is Fearful, they are LESS likely to be Capable.
    131. 131. Revealing The Realm
    132. 132. Revealing The Realm If someone is Fearless, they are LESS likely to be Incapable.
    133. 133. Revealing The Realm
    134. 134. Revealing The Realm This is the resulting area for the entire x and y axes pairs.
    135. 135. Revealing The Realm
    136. 136. Revealing The Realm If someone is Fearful, they are MORE likely to be Selfish.
    137. 137. Revealing The Realm
    138. 138. Revealing The Realm If someone is Fearless, they are MORE likely to be Selfless.
    139. 139. Revealing The Realm
    140. 140. Revealing The Realm If someone is Selfless, they are LESS likely to be Fearful.
    141. 141. Revealing The Realm
    142. 142. Revealing The Realm If someone is Selfish, they are LESS likely to be Fearless.
    143. 143. Revealing The Realm
    144. 144. Revealing The Realm This is the resulting area for the entire x and z axes pairs.
    145. 145. Revealing The Realm
    146. 146. Revealing The Realm If someone is Incapable at synthesizing information, they are MORE likely to be Selfish.
    147. 147. Revealing The Realm
    148. 148. Revealing The Realm If someone is Capable at synthesizing information, they are MORE likely to be Selfless.
    149. 149. Revealing The Realm
    150. 150. Revealing The Realm If someone is Selfish, they are LESS likely to be Capable.
    151. 151. Revealing The Realm
    152. 152. Revealing The Realm If someone is Selfless, they are LESS likely to be Incapable.
    153. 153. Revealing The Realm
    154. 154. Revealing The Realm This is the resulting area for the entire y and z axes pairs.
    155. 155. The Realm
    156. 156. The Realm This is The Realm of likelihood wherein most responses will fall; however, that is not to suggest that there are not a significant amount of responses that fall outside of The Realm. People are a very unpredictable breed at times. The next slide will be a recap of The Human Response Matrix, which will be good for printing or saving.
    157. 157. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    158. 158. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    159. 159. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    160. 160. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    161. 161. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    162. 162. Let’s bring this back down so you can see it at it’s proper angle.
    163. 163. Now, let’s revisit the NeedsParadigm and see how these two theories relate.
    164. 164. Now, let’s revisit the NeedsParadigm and see how these two theories relate.
    165. 165. Now, let’s revisit the NeedsParadigm and see how these two theories relate.
    166. 166. Now, let’s revisit the NeedsParadigm and see how these two theories relate.
    167. 167. Now, let’s revisit the NeedsParadigm and see how these two theories relate.
    168. 168. Positive Responses are the alternative. Since such responses are goingSince Negative Responses are going to reside in the to reside in the quadrants that are created by the portions of the axesquadrants that are created by the portions of the axes that that represent the traits: Fearless, Selfless, and Capable, individualsrepresent the traits: Fearful, Selfish, and Incapable, choosing such responses are concerned with others and all else beforeindividuals choosing such responses are, typically, not self. This can, or course, be a balancing act at times; self is not,simply carrying out preemptive protection measures, they typically, completely disregarded. The point is that actions are not theare also, typically, because of fear, performing preemptive result of fear for ones security. The responses are not acted out in totalstriking measures. Such responses cause a vicious cycle of ignorance of the pain and/or suffering in life, but in full awareness ofalways working backwards through the Needs Paradigm as them, especially the fact that the source of most of the pain and/orone consistently reenforces their personal security suffering is others, who likewise endured pain and/or suffering at themeasures at each Natural Need level. As others see the the hands of others. Such responses break the vicious cycle of Negativeincreased security measures, they too feel threatened and Responses, which most people are accustomed to. Bottom Line: Positiveenact their own measures. Again, the measures will very Responses focus on transcending the shackles of life - pain/suffering andoften manifest as preemptive strikes against each other. a narrowed perception and seeking the same for everyone.Bottom line: Negative Responses focuses on avoiding pain/suffering by protecting self alone and are often erroneouslyseen as the only alternative.
    169. 169. So, what drives you?
    170. 170. What Drives You? Directed by: Damian Niolet CG Design work by: Damian Niolet Animations by: Damian Niolet Copy written by: Damian Niolet Theories created by: Damian Niolet (except where indicated) Niolet’s Needs Paradigm and Niolet’s Human Response Matrix are properties of Damian Niolet. Feel free todisseminate this slideshow, so long as it remains intact. Feel free to share the theories so long as I am credited. (If I seem a little too protective of this material . . . Hey! I have needs!) Google SketchUp is owned by Google This is version 1.0 of “What Drives You?” Enhancements for Version 2.0 will include music and sound effects. Help me perfect version 2.0 with any comments or suggestions. Find me all over the internet by searching for me by name or my screen name, “dniolet.” Or contact me directly at dniolet@gmail.com “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” - Mahatma Gandhi

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