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The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs
 

The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs

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The Behavior Design Checklist Tool to Identify Strengths and Weaknesses in Physical Activity Employee Wellness Programs.

The Behavior Design Checklist Tool to Identify Strengths and Weaknesses in Physical Activity Employee Wellness Programs.

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    The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs Presentation Transcript

    • The Checklist:A Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness ProgramsThis checklist was influenced by leading behavior change and persuasion frameworks. It was bornout of a Stanford Honors Thesis research project to evaluate physical activity wellness programs.The purpose of The Checklist is to guide wellness directors and designers to systematically thinkthrough and identify strengths and weaknesses in behavior change programs.Research 1: Fogg Behavior ModelResearch 2: Positive ReinforcementResearch 3: Cialdini Influence PrinciplesThe Fogg Behavior Model (FBM) serves as a high level glance test in The Checklist. The FBMposits that a behavior will only happen if three things are simultaneously present:1) A call to action: The trigger2) Simplicity: easy enough to do3) Motivation: a desire to doPositive reinforcement research is based on shaping behavior through “rewards” in small doses atrandom intervals. The timing of the positive reinforcer is key because you want it to happenDURING the target behavior. Also, the reward (positive reinforcer) is most powerful at RANDOMintervals. For example, imagine the common habit of checking emails or text messages: we neverknow what email or message we will receive, but SOMETIMES we hear from someone worthwhile(the reward). Your program should aim to be this addicting.Dr. Robert Cialdini’s research on the six universal principles of influence targets the most specificaspects of the program.1) Authority2) Commitment/Consistency3) Similarity4) Scarcity5) Social Proofbit.ly/foggmodelResourcesbit.ly/positivereinforcementhttp://bit.ly/cialdiniprinciples
    • The Checklist:A Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness ProgramsThis checklist was influenced by leading behavior change and persuasion frameworks. It was bornout of a Stanford Honors Thesis research project to evaluate physical activity wellness programs.The purpose of The Checklist is to guide wellness directors and designers to systematically thinkthrough and identify strengths and weaknesses in behavior change programs.Set 1: Glance TestA. Trigger: Is it clear how this program triggers Bob or Susan to participate inthe program? (i.e., email, brochure, weekly in-person meeting)B. Ability: Is it easy for Bob or Susan to actually engage in the targetphysical activity program?C. Motivation: Have Bob or Susan expressed desire to participate in theprogram?Set 2: Reinforcement Test (program perspective)A. Do Bob or Susan receive positive reinforcement DURING theirparticipation in the wellness program?B. Are you giving positive reinforcement/rewards at random frequenciesthroughout the program?Set 3: Influence TestA. Authority: Is the program represented by a respected/admired brand orfigure?B. Commitment/Consistency: Has Bob or Susan made a commitment tosomething small that relates to the goal of the target program?(i.e., employees expressing interest on a form to learn more about dance classes will be morelikely to attend dance classes because they want to stay consistent with their commitment).C. Similarity: Are there existing participants similar to Bob or Susan?(i.e., 20-25 year old males will most likely not attend a class that is 95% 40-50 year oldmothers because it seems like a class for “Mothers”).D. Scarcity: Is a valuable aspect of the program deliberately hard to obtain?(i.e., Limited enrollment and first come first served makes a program more desirable)E. Social Proof: Do Bob or Susan see this wellness program as popular?Yes/NoTotal_ _Yes/NoNotes & Things to Consider
    • The Checklist:A Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness ProgramsWhat now?The Checklist helps wellness directors and designers think through the strengths andweaknesses of their programs. The next step is to look at the results and make smallprogram modifications based on:-What you learned.-What surprised you.-What you still need to know.1. What did you learn?2. What surprised you?3. What do you still want to know?4. What is one thing you can do about this now?