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City of Austin -  Volunteerism Benchmarking Study
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City of Austin - Volunteerism Benchmarking Study

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I'm serving on the City of Austin Volunteerism Strategy committee. This enviromental benchmarking study was one of the first project we reviewed to help shape the future landscape of volunteering in …

I'm serving on the City of Austin Volunteerism Strategy committee. This enviromental benchmarking study was one of the first project we reviewed to help shape the future landscape of volunteering in Austin, TX.

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  • No data on Native American volunteer rates
  • Transcript

    • 1. Volunteerism in Austin:How we can regain our position and help our community
    • 2. Cities of Service•Bloomberg Philanthropies•Impact Volunteering Fund•Grant provisions •Chief Service Officer •Four issue-based programs •Recruitment tools
    • 3. Concluding the Grant Process•Make Austin model city of service•Increase volunteerism and civic engagement•Chief Service Officer Sly Majid•Tailor to Austin landscape •NPOs, businesses, demographics, culture and lifestyle •Existing resources, functions, needs•Optimize position of Mayor’s Office
    • 4. Moving Forward•Identified best practices, patterns in service/engagement•Four themes in national service•Austin’s high points•Ideas for future pathways
    • 5. Corporation for Nationaland Community ServiceVolunteering In America2011
    • 6. Top Volunteering Cities•Twin Cities•Seattle•Portland•Salt Lake City•Columbus•Hartford•Kansas City•Oklahoma City•Washington D.C.•Milwaukee•St. Louis•Rochester*
    • 7. The Themes Demographics Corporate InvolvementInstitutional Support Civic Engagement and City Culture
    • 8. PopulationExplosion
    • 9. GROWTH RATES FOR BENCHMARKING CITIES 2000- 2010 Metro City• Twin Cities 10.5% -0.35%• Seattle 13% 8%• Portland 15.5% 10.3%• Salt Lake City 16% 2.6%• Columbus 13.9% 10.6%• Hartford 5.6% 2.6%• Kansas City 10.9% 4.1%• Oklahoma City 14.4% 14.6%• Washington D.C. 16.4% 5.2%• Milwaukee 3.7% -0.4%• St. Louis 4.2% -8.3%• Rochester 1.6% -4.2%• Austin 37.3% 20.4%
    • 10. CHANGE IN POPULATION AND CHANGE IN VOLUNTEER RATE 2004-2010 20%Change in Volunteer Rate from 2004 to 15% 10% 5% 2010 0% -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% -5% -10% -15% -20% Change in Population from 2000 to 2010
    • 11. Magnet for Young Adults
    • 12. Austins Age Distribution 85+ 80-84 75-79 70-74 65-69 60-64 55-59 50-54 45-49Age 40-44 35-39 30-34 25-29 20-24 15-19 10-14 05-09 00-04 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 Population 2010 Census Data via DSHS Center for Health Statistics
    • 13. VOLUNTEER RATE BY AGE GROUP35.00% 31.80% 30.60%30.00% 28.10% 24%25.00% 23.30% 22.50%20.00%15.00%10.00%5.00%0.00% 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65+ Volunteer Rate in 2011 Bureau of Labor Statistics Volunteering in United States, 2011 Economic News Release
    • 14. Fast GrowingOlder Population
    • 15. Austin Growth by Age Group from 2005-2010 60-69 35.00% 32.90% 30.00% 0-9 25.00% 010-19 80+ 20-29Percent Growth 20.00% 18.83% 10-19 50-59 30-39 15.76% 16.21% 40-49 0-9 70-79 15.00% 13.10% 13.39% 50-59 30-39 60-69 20-29 9.30% 10.00% 70-79 7.71% 40-49 5.34% 80+ 5.00% 0.00% Age Groups 2005-2010 Census Data via DSHS Center for Health Statistics
    • 16. Bureau of Labor Statistics Volunteering inUnited States, 2011 Economic News Release
    • 17. “Majority-Minority”
    • 18. Volunteer Rate by Ethnicity 28.2%30%25% 20.8% 20.0%20% 14.9%15%10%5%0% White Black/African Asian Hispanic/Latino American Bureau of Labor Statistics Volunteering in United States, 2011 Economic News Release
    • 19. Tale of Two Cities
    • 20. City Examples RochesterMinneapolis-St. Paul Seattle Columbus Portland
    • 21. Local SupportAustin Pro Bono•Connect organizations and skilled individuals who offer probono services to nonprofitsUnited Way for Greater Austin•Seeks the root of problems in the community to ensure lastingsolutions and to offer alternatives for a better lifeHands on Central Texas•Program of United Way•Strengthens communities through volunteer service focused oneducation, income, health, and the environment
    • 22. Government Initiatives Conference on Service •Learn, Connect, Be Inspired, and Make a Difference •Inclusion of nonprofit, government, business, and faith-based sectors Volunteer Recognition •Annual Volunteer Recognition awards •Lieutenant Governor’s Volunteer Recognition Certificate Volunteer Management •Thorough certificate program •After certified, trainers are able to teach volunteer management courses to nonprofits
    • 23. Government Initiatives Non-profit Liaison to the Governor •Established in 2011 •Cabinet-level position which serves as a state advocate for nonprofit community providers “This position provides an important linkage between community providers and the Executive Branch…of its ongoing commitment to the nonprofit health and human services organizations that serve as the safety net for 500,000 of the state’s residents.” -Terry Edelstein
    • 24. Volunteer Center Efforts Wisconsin •Partnership between Nonprofit Center of Greater Milwaukee and Volunteer Center of Greater Milwaukee •Over 600 member organizations following consolidation •VolunteerWisconsin.org operated by Volunteer Center Association of Wisconsin
    • 25. Austin Business and Service•Job growth: 21.3%; 140,200 jobs •Funding  Jobs  Growth •Startups•Lack of proportional service growth•Unorganized business engagement structures •Volunteering •Giving
    • 26. Unemployment and Volunteer Trends Unemployment and Volunteering in•Austin T Five Service Cities and Austin op 40 •Lowest 38 Volunteer Rate (% Population) unemployment 36 •Greatest affect 34 32•Unemployment 30 Austinrelatively less affecting 28 T Cities winin top cities Portland 26 •Downward and 24 Salt Lake City upward trends 22 Seattle •Portland outlier 2 4 6 8 10 12 Unemployment Rate (% Work Force)
    • 27. Volunteering and Job Creation Volunteering in Top Five Job Creation Cities 40 Volunteer Rate (% Population)•Salt Lake City 38service not 36affected by jobs 34 Austin: 21.3%•Service in Texas 32 Salt Lake City: 13.5%not reacting to 30 San Antonio: 13.1%economic 28 Houston: 15.7% Fort Worth: 10.8%recovery 26 24•Texas civic 22engagement 20 2007 2008 2009 2010 Year
    • 28. Good Business Practices Companies St. Louis, Anheuser-Busch J.P. Morgan Chase, Tech for Social Good Corporate/Business Volunteer Councils Twin Cities, Corporate Volunteerism Council Philanthropic Foundations Columbus, The Columbus Foundation
    • 29. Philanthropy in Austin•1997-2008: individual giving fell 5.8% to 4.2%•Young city•Major corporations•Multiple organizations handling philanthropic donations •I Live Here, I Give Here •Austin Community Foundation •United Way
    • 30. Top Giving Cities and Austin City City Population MDI Med % Med Contribution Total ContributionsHouston, TX 2,099,451 $66,264 5.00% $3,332 $3,100,000,000San Jose, CA 945,942 $65,831 3.50% $2,277 $1,200,000,000Austin, TX 790,390 $64,597 4.10% $2,630 $790,800,000Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1,939,022 $63,504 5.30% $3,394 $3,700,000,000San Antonio, TX 1,327,407 $61,386 4.60% $2,846 $650,000,000Boston, MA 617,594 $60,312 2.80% $1,719 $2,500,000,000San Diego, CA 1,307,402 $58,845 4.00% $2,328 $1,400,000,000Jacksonville, FL 821,784 $58,811 5.20% $3,078 $617,300,000Philadelphia, PA 1,526,006 $57,523 4.00% $2,295 $3,000,000,000Indianapolis, IN 820,445 $56,830 4.60% $2,632 $762,800,000San Francisco, CA 805,235 $56,594 3.90% $2,180 $3,100,000,000Memphis, TN 646,889 $56,240 7.20% $4,035 $703,800,000Baltimore, MD 620,961 $56,161 4.80% $2,683 $1,600,000,000Charlotte, NC 731,424 $54,862 5.80% $3,162 $1,100,000,000Chicago, IL 2,695,598 $54,858 4.20% $2,296 $5,100,000,000Detroit, MI 713,777 $53,508 4.40% $2,329 $1,800,000,000Phoenix, AZ 1,445,632 $53,064 4.60% $2,445 $1,700,000,000Los Angeles, CA 3,792,621 $51,300 5.10% $2,630 $6,700,000,000New York, NY 8,175,133 $51,038 4.60% $2,361 $12,900,000,000Columbus, OH 787,033 $47,696 4.30% $2,062 $735,800,000
    • 31. Austin’s Culture•Small scale/individual volunteering not included in CNCSstudy •Hours per person volunteering above average •Matching personalized interest – likely more effective than broad “volunteering” campaigns •ATX niche culture: favoritism for “the new” works as an idea incubator & a barrier to collaboration •New Austinites have limited resources for orientation •Correlation between election turnout & homeownership
    • 32. City Examples•Twin Cities: history of volunteerism•Civic engagement in Milwaukee, TwinCities, Salt Lake City, and Rochester•Milwaukee: “City of Festivals”•St. Louis: home-ownership & neighborhoodinvolvement•Portland: Office of Neighborhood involvement
    • 33. Culture•Vibrant and diverse•Local and independent•Active•Artistic•Pride
    • 34. Higher Education•One of the most educated metropolitan areas in thenation 43.3% of Austin has a college degree 23.3% of Texas and 24.4% of the US has a college degree•High level of support from community Approved proposition for new medical school
    • 35. Tech Sector• Headquarters for well-known companies, particularly for semiconductors and software• City support through the Emerging Technologies Program• Diversifies job market• Booming tech start up industry  http://austinstartup.com
    • 36. Nonprofit Community•More nonprofits per capita than any other city in Texas•Broad range of services offered•Multitude of volunteer opportunities
    • 37. Organizational OutreachAustin Youth CouncilMayor’s Taskforce on Aging
    • 38. Framework for Planning• Thinking systematically• Designing a centralized web resource hub which supports and advertises nonprofit opportunities• Structures for engaging business sector: incentives process, Corporate Volunteerism Council, Chamber of Commerce representation for non-profit sector• Neighborhood involvement & investment
    • 39. Contact:Ellen Ray- ellen.ray@austintexas.govCarrie Powell-carrie.powell@austintexas.govAnisha Vichare-anisha.vichare@austintexas.govTaylor Timinsky-taylor.timinsky@austintexas.gov

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