Part 5e of final

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Part 5e of final

  1. 1. Part 5e of Final<br />Radon Detection and Dangers<br />
  2. 2. Radon is a gas that is a biproduct of the alpha decay of radium.<br />Radon is a dangerous, radioactive element.<br />Radium is naturally present in the Earth, and especially in Pennsylvania.<br />This radium decays naturally, and therefore radon is a significant issue in Pennsylvania<br />What is Radon?<br />
  3. 3. Second Leading cause of lung cancer in US (after smoking)<br />Adverse respiratory effects from inhalation<br />Stomach cancer and other problems associated with the stomach<br />Dangers of Radon<br />
  4. 4. How radon Enters the Body<br />
  5. 5. How Radon Enters Your Home<br />
  6. 6. Mitigation units can be placed in home<br />In addition to detecting radon, mitigation units can also ventilate radon out of your home<br />Simpler Radon Kits can be obtained at<br />Hardware stores<br />Online shopping<br />Home improvement Stores<br />County Health Departments<br />Radon Detection<br />
  7. 7. Two Categories:<br />Short-Term<br />Charcoal Canisters<br />Continuous Monitors<br />Long-term<br />Alpha-Track Detectors<br />Electret Ion Detectors<br />Radon Detection<br />
  8. 8. Charcoal Canisters:<br />Charcoal canisters are small containers that contain activated charcoal, which adsorbs toxins. Radon adsorbs to the charcoal and after about 3 to 7 days, the sample is taken to a lab where the concentration of radon in air is calculated. From this point, scintillation liquid is added to the sample and the sample is analyzed by a scintillation counter, which will measure in terms of concentration. Radon is then converted into counts per minute. <br />Short-Term Detection<br />
  9. 9. Continuous Monitor<br />Air is diffused into a scintillation cell, which is able to determine the radon concentration through electronic calculations.<br />Short-Term Detection (cont’d)<br />
  10. 10. Short-Term Detection (cont’d)<br />Charcoal Canister<br />Continuous Radon Monitoring<br />
  11. 11. Alpha-Track Radon Detectors<br />When radon enters the detector, the radon will decay and in doing so will release alpha particles. The alpha particles are detected by the detector. By performing microscopic analyses, the places where the alpha particles hit the detector can be seen. A computer counts the number of alpha particles that hit the detector. These analyses are collected over a long period, so the average radon level is calculated by dividing the number of hits (called tracks) by the number of days. This value is then converted into picocuries per liter.<br />Long-Term Detection<br />
  12. 12. Electret-Ion Detection<br />Electret-Ion Detectors contain a Teflon disc, which has a negative charge. When radon enters the detector, it decays and releases alpha particles. When these alpha particles hit the Teflon disc, the charge of the Teflon disc is reduced. The concentration of radon in your home can be determined through laboratory analysis. <br />Long-Term Detection (cont’d)<br />
  13. 13. Long-Term Detection (cont’d)<br />Alpha-Track Detector<br />Electret-ion Detector<br />
  14. 14. Get Your Home Detected Today!<br />

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