LAFS PREPRO Session 1 - Introduction
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LAFS PREPRO Session 1 - Introduction

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Project Management Lecture for Session 1 of The Los Angeles Film School's Game PreProduction course.

Project Management Lecture for Session 1 of The Los Angeles Film School's Game PreProduction course.

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  • Think: Thinking allows beings to make sense of or model the world in different ways, and to represent or interpret it in ways that are significant to them, or which accord with their needs, attachments, objectives, plans, commitments, ends and desires.Understand: Understanding implies abilities and dispositions with respect to an object of knowledge sufficient to support intelligent behavior.Reflect and Connect: Arguably, the most important aspects of education is to provide students with knowledge that they can transfer in meaningful ways to other aspects of their present or future lives. For example, we do not teach history simply so students can pass a quiz, but so that they can reason better about the world around them.

LAFS PREPRO Session 1 - Introduction LAFS PREPRO Session 1 - Introduction Presentation Transcript

  • Session 1 David Mullich Concept Workshop - Game PreProduction The Los Angeles Film School
  • Who Am I?  David Mullich  dmullich@lafilm.edu  @David_Mullich  davidmullich.wordpress.com  Instructor at LAFS  Producer from Activision, Disney, 3DO  Co-creator of BSA Game Design Merit Badge
  • Who Are You? 1. What is your name? 2. Where are you from? 3. What is your favorite movie? 4. What is your favorite game? 5. What is your career goal?
  • How to Succeed in This Class Studying game development at college is still college study.  Take Notes  Study  Do Your Work
  • Take Notes Game producers constantly take notes. So, having one of these is a minimum requirement. At all times.
  • Study  Review the Lecture Notes  Think  Understand  Reflect and Connect
  • On Time Means 5 minutes early. Unless the stakes are really high, in which case it means 24 hours early. Or a week early. Pssst....Sometimes developers make false internal deadlines to avoid calamity such as missed milestone payments. Maybe you could do the same if graduation is at stake?
  • Tests  Study for your tests! Refer to the slides.  If you see on a slide, it will probably be on the test.  If you don’t know the answer to a test question, guess!  There are no points deducted for wrong answers on multiple-choice questions  I will award some points for clever or knowledgeable answers on short-answer questions, even if they weren’t the answer I was looking for.
  • Do You Have Skillz?  Gamers are good at digital interfaces  Gaming professionals are good at both digital and human interfaces
  • This means communication. With grammar‐Nazis. “...the different ways they done it like in the game play and the scenes ad the props” ...is not communicating and will incur their wrath. Game development is a team sport for Geeks.
  • All Business is Communication  Business to Consumer  Business to Business  Boss to Team  Team to Boss  Team Member to Team Member
  • Good Communication  Precise  Clear  Brief
  • Written Communication Informal Communication “Its cool to werk in gamez.u get too do anything u want & stuff” Formal Communication “It’s cool to work in games. You get to do anything you want and stuff.”
  • Written Communication  Capitalize the beginning of sentences, names, game titles, and the word “I”  Use proper spelling and punctuation  Put a space between punctuation mark ending a sentence and the start of the next sentence  Don’t use “u” for “you”, or “&” for “and”  Don’t confuse “its” and “it’s”
  • Attention to detial It matters.
  • Emails  Use a meaningful subject line (e.g., “Homework 2”)  Send attachments as PDF files only  Put your name on all attachments
  • Assignments If you can’t be bothered to:  be creative  strive for originality even within established norms or constraints  look beyond your initial idea  actually enjoy and actively want to do the above Then get used to the phrase “Would you like fries with that?”
  • Tokenism The practice or policy of making no more than a token effort or gesture.  Token verbal presentations.  Token game documentation.  Token effort. Does NOT belong in game development practice ANY kind. Do not aim to do the minimal required. Aim to exceed expectations.
  • “I just want to pass this” Classes are not kidney stones. If you think about them in these terms, maybe you’re on the wrong career path?
  •  Send an email to dmullich@lafilm.edu from your school email account.  Use “Email MiniQuest” as the Subject line.
  • Let’s go to the next topic!