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Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
Evaluating Online Sources
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Evaluating Online Sources

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  • 1. Evaluating online sources Remember CARS
  • 2. CARS <ul><li>Not the cars from the popular Disney movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Not the sporty ones you dream about owning. </li></ul><ul><li>A method to evaluate whether or not a print or online source is worth research. </li></ul>
  • 3. CARS <ul><li>Credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy </li></ul><ul><li>Reasonableness </li></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul>
  • 4. Credibility <ul><li>Who is the author and publisher? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the author and publishers authoritative – are they “experts” in the field they are writing about? </li></ul><ul><li>What are their credentials in relation to the topic they are discussing? </li></ul><ul><li>This is particularly important with online sources as anyone can post a site or blog to the Internet. </li></ul>
  • 5. Accuracy <ul><li>How up-to-date is the author’s information (check publishing dates)? </li></ul><ul><li>How comprehensive is the work – does it cover all or most of the important details? </li></ul><ul><li>For what type of audience was the work written? (children, scholars, anyone) </li></ul><ul><li>What is the author’s purpose? </li></ul>
  • 6. Reasonableness <ul><li>Author’s purpose is also important in determining reasonableness. </li></ul><ul><li>How biased and slanted is the author? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the author’s worldview (religious views, political views, philosophies about life)? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the author fair and looking at all sides of an argument (the author does not have to agree with all sides, but should acknowledge it). </li></ul>
  • 7. Support <ul><li>What documentation does the author have for his/her claims? </li></ul><ul><li>Are their sources listed (these can often point you towards other research sources)? </li></ul><ul><li>Do other authors and sources speak highly of the author and his/her research and writing? </li></ul>
  • 8. CARS <ul><li>This becomes important too when evaluating your own final writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Credibility – Are you writing from your own point of view and using your own argument? </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy – Are you presenting the whole truth with up to date information? </li></ul><ul><li>Reasonableness – Are you looking at the sides objectively before making a final conclusion? </li></ul><ul><li>Support - Are your points backed up with data and details? </li></ul>
  • 9. Remember CARS <ul><li>To move full speed ahead to writing a successful research essay </li></ul>

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