Navajo weaving

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Navajo weaving

  1. 1. NAVAJO WEAVING http://www.camerontradingpost.com/navajo-weaving.html http://www.camerontradingpost.com/navajo-weaving.html By David Moya
  2. 2. A Brief History  Navajo (nomadic) weavings are believed to have an origin with the Pueblo Natives.
  3. 3. A Brief History   Navajo (nomadic) weavings are believed to have an origin with the Pueblo Natives. The Navajo had no word for “art”, and their weavings were essentially served practical purposes.
  4. 4. A Brief History    Navajo (nomadic) weavings are believed to have an origin with the Pueblo Natives. The Navajo had no word for “art”, and their weavings were essentially served practical purposes. Their weavings were very fine and water resistant due to the use of Churro sheep, but this changed in 1863.
  5. 5. A Brief History     Navajo (nomadic) weavings are believed to have an origin with the Pueblo Natives. The Navajo had no word for “art”, and their weavings were essentially served practical purposes. Their weavings were very fine and water resistant due to the use of Churro sheep, but this changed in 1863. Were given new sheep, but had to adapt and therefore weavings became heavier, thicker, and dyed differently.
  6. 6. A Brief History      Navajo (nomadic) weavings are believed to have an origin with the Pueblo Natives. The Navajo had no word for “art”, and their weavings were essentially served practical purposes. Their weavings were very fine and water resistant due to the use of Churro sheep, but this changed in 1863. Were given new sheep, but had to adapt and therefore weavings became heavier, thicker, and dyed differently. trading post was 1860s the Hubble established, which exposed Navajo weaving to the rest of the national economy.
  7. 7. Two Gray Hills rugs http://www.medicinemangallery.com/NativeAmericanIndians/Rugs/TwoGrey-Hills/2/Belinda-Wilson-Two-Grey-Hills
  8. 8. Teec Nos Pos, which means "cottonwoods in a circle" http://www.garlandsrugs.com/collections/teec-nos-poshome/products/teec-nos-pos-elouise-shorty
  9. 9. Ganado rug http://www.medicinemangallery.com/NativeAmericanIndians/Rugs/Ganado -Navajo/9/Navajo-Ganado-Rug
  10. 10. Crystal rugs http://www.medicinemangallery.com/NativeAmericanIndians/Rugs/CrystalNavajo/12/Navajo-Crystal-Rug

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