How to Leverage the Social Graph with Facebook Platform

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Facebook is about more than just Pages and Groups. Facebook's set of powerful APIs, Facebook Platform, has made it easier than ever to create engaging social experiences on your own sites. We'll talk …

Facebook is about more than just Pages and Groups. Facebook's set of powerful APIs, Facebook Platform, has made it easier than ever to create engaging social experiences on your own sites. We'll talk about why you will want to take advantage of Facebook Platform, share an example of using Facebook Platform to drive engagement and give you several strategies for how you can go back to your campus and quickly take advantage of Facebook Platform.

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  • Thanks for that introduction CJ. So the talk is all about Facebook Platform and…
  • Again, my name is Dave Olsen and for the last eight years I’ve worked at West Virginia University as a programmer and project manager for the Web unit of University Relations. So a technical unit within our marketing and communications group which gives us a lot of flexibility and allows us to work on some really cool projects. For scale, West Virginia University is a land grant university with 32,000 students. On twitter @dmolsen.

  • This presentation is currently available on SlideShare at the address shown here. I think this is the only site where my account name is not just dmolsen. My entire script for the talk is included as notes for each slide so feel free to relax and just jot down reactions to the things shown here. All the important numbers and what not are listed in the notes on slideshare. Which is a good thing because…

  • The presentation on the USB drives you’ve received has been trashed. I’m very sorry about that but two things happened that caused me to do a rewrite, actually multiple rewrites. The first…

  • Was that our content management system decided to throw a temper tantrum during the summer. A month and a half long temper tantrum to be exact. It put us seriously behind on our project schedule. When I handed in the slides we still hoped to get our “case study” facebook platform site live in time for this talk. Unfortunately that didn’t happen as the project eventually got axed. So no case study from us but hopefully the examples I provide are still helpful. The second cause was…

  • This guy. This is Luke Wroblewski, former chief design architect at Yahoo! And currently an entrepeuneur in residence at benchmark capital. That’s his twitter username there. Luke gave a talk at the Design for Mobile conference in September, and, while he only spent about three minutes on facebook platform the point he made regarding it and its implications for engaging users really blew my mind. Hopefully the excitement he had, that I have, can come through this talk and show you why Facebook Platform is going to be a game changer in your efforts to directly engage users with your marketing campaigns. So with that backstory out of the way what are you going to get out of this talk…

  • First, I’ll talk about the What. So basically what Facebook Platform is.
  • Second, I’ll talk about the Why. Why you should use Facebook Platform. Why it matters to your organization.
  • And, thirdly, I’ll talk about the How. How your organization can take advantage of Facebook Platform and some examples that I think we’ll get you pointed in the right direction for developing great social experiences for your users.

    So let’s start with the What…
  • Instead of talking about what it is let me lay out what it isn’t…

  • It isn’t Facebook Pages.
  • It isn’t Facebook Groups.
  • And it isn’t Facebook Places.

    All of these I can be accessed from Facebook Platform via the Graph API but they’re not at the core of Facebook Platform.

    Ok, so if they aren’t at the core of facebook platform what is?

  • It’s all about your website. So you can leverage…
  • …your branding and identity,…
  • …your content and…
  • …your web address. I think the web address also ties back into branding as well.
  • So Facebook Platform is really about makeing your website personalized and social. You don’t have to rely on Pages or Groups for your only interaction with users on Facebook. They’re nice, definitely useful, but they have really limited opportunity to develop experiences or leverage your own brand and identity and make an impression on the user. Facebook Platform allows you to provide that customized experience for users on your own terms.
    So that’s the sort of high-level philosophy of Facebook Platform. So much so that their documentation even touts what we’re going to be talking about today as Facebook for Websites.
  • So in order to implement this philosophy that Facebook espouses they provide essentially four tools via Facebook Platform.
    Social Plugins
    The first tool is Social Plugins. They are, by far, the easiest Facebook Platform tool to implement. Social plugins require just one line of code. And because they’re implemented via an iframe and are served directly by Facebook, the content is personalized to the viewer whether or not they have signed into your site. So there’s no real work for you beyond copying that one line of code and your site will be connected with Facebook. Examples of social plugins would be the like button or the live stream plugin.

    Authentication
    The second tool is authentication. Facebook authentication enables your website to interact with the Graph API (aka Facebook data) on behalf of Facebook users, and it does this through a cool single-sign on mechanism. It is the most powerful tool in the Facebook Platform toolbox. It definitely takes a bit more work to implement but I think the pay-off is well worth it.

    Graph API
    The third tool is the Graph API. Facebook considers this the core of Facebook Platform. This is all the data stored in Facebook and the API enables you to read and write that data to and from Facebook. Basically it provides a simple and consistent view of items in Facebook (like people, photos, events, and pages) and then the connections between those items (like friendships, likes, and photo tags).

    Open Graph Protocol
    The last tool, and, so far for me, the least useful as far as higher ed is concerned, is the Open Graph protocol. It enables you to integrate your regular web pages into what Facebook terms the social graph. Essentially add some common meta-data tags to your web pages and Facebook can get a better idea of what the content of the page is related to.

    I’ll go into more depth on these tools during the How section. For now I want to talk about…

  • So in order to implement this philosophy that Facebook espouses they provide essentially four tools via Facebook Platform.
    Social Plugins
    The first tool is Social Plugins. They are, by far, the easiest Facebook Platform tool to implement. Social plugins require just one line of code. And because they’re implemented via an iframe and are served directly by Facebook, the content is personalized to the viewer whether or not they have signed into your site. So there’s no real work for you beyond copying that one line of code and your site will be connected with Facebook. Examples of social plugins would be the like button or the live stream plugin.

    Authentication
    The second tool is authentication. Facebook authentication enables your website to interact with the Graph API (aka Facebook data) on behalf of Facebook users, and it does this through a cool single-sign on mechanism. It is the most powerful tool in the Facebook Platform toolbox. It definitely takes a bit more work to implement but I think the pay-off is well worth it.

    Graph API
    The third tool is the Graph API. Facebook considers this the core of Facebook Platform. This is all the data stored in Facebook and the API enables you to read and write that data to and from Facebook. Basically it provides a simple and consistent view of items in Facebook (like people, photos, events, and pages) and then the connections between those items (like friendships, likes, and photo tags).

    Open Graph Protocol
    The last tool, and, so far for me, the least useful as far as higher ed is concerned, is the Open Graph protocol. It enables you to integrate your regular web pages into what Facebook terms the social graph. Essentially add some common meta-data tags to your web pages and Facebook can get a better idea of what the content of the page is related to.

    I’ll go into more depth on these tools during the How section. For now I want to talk about…

  • So in order to implement this philosophy that Facebook espouses they provide essentially four tools via Facebook Platform.
    Social Plugins
    The first tool is Social Plugins. They are, by far, the easiest Facebook Platform tool to implement. Social plugins require just one line of code. And because they’re implemented via an iframe and are served directly by Facebook, the content is personalized to the viewer whether or not they have signed into your site. So there’s no real work for you beyond copying that one line of code and your site will be connected with Facebook. Examples of social plugins would be the like button or the live stream plugin.

    Authentication
    The second tool is authentication. Facebook authentication enables your website to interact with the Graph API (aka Facebook data) on behalf of Facebook users, and it does this through a cool single-sign on mechanism. It is the most powerful tool in the Facebook Platform toolbox. It definitely takes a bit more work to implement but I think the pay-off is well worth it.

    Graph API
    The third tool is the Graph API. Facebook considers this the core of Facebook Platform. This is all the data stored in Facebook and the API enables you to read and write that data to and from Facebook. Basically it provides a simple and consistent view of items in Facebook (like people, photos, events, and pages) and then the connections between those items (like friendships, likes, and photo tags).

    Open Graph Protocol
    The last tool, and, so far for me, the least useful as far as higher ed is concerned, is the Open Graph protocol. It enables you to integrate your regular web pages into what Facebook terms the social graph. Essentially add some common meta-data tags to your web pages and Facebook can get a better idea of what the content of the page is related to.

    I’ll go into more depth on these tools during the How section. For now I want to talk about…

  • So in order to implement this philosophy that Facebook espouses they provide essentially four tools via Facebook Platform.
    Social Plugins
    The first tool is Social Plugins. They are, by far, the easiest Facebook Platform tool to implement. Social plugins require just one line of code. And because they’re implemented via an iframe and are served directly by Facebook, the content is personalized to the viewer whether or not they have signed into your site. So there’s no real work for you beyond copying that one line of code and your site will be connected with Facebook. Examples of social plugins would be the like button or the live stream plugin.

    Authentication
    The second tool is authentication. Facebook authentication enables your website to interact with the Graph API (aka Facebook data) on behalf of Facebook users, and it does this through a cool single-sign on mechanism. It is the most powerful tool in the Facebook Platform toolbox. It definitely takes a bit more work to implement but I think the pay-off is well worth it.

    Graph API
    The third tool is the Graph API. Facebook considers this the core of Facebook Platform. This is all the data stored in Facebook and the API enables you to read and write that data to and from Facebook. Basically it provides a simple and consistent view of items in Facebook (like people, photos, events, and pages) and then the connections between those items (like friendships, likes, and photo tags).

    Open Graph Protocol
    The last tool, and, so far for me, the least useful as far as higher ed is concerned, is the Open Graph protocol. It enables you to integrate your regular web pages into what Facebook terms the social graph. Essentially add some common meta-data tags to your web pages and Facebook can get a better idea of what the content of the page is related to.

    I’ll go into more depth on these tools during the How section. For now I want to talk about…

  • The Why of Facebook Platform. Again, why should you use Facebook Platform and why is it going to be useful and make a difference to your organization.
  • The first number that anyone talks about when they’re discussing Facebook in general is this number, 500 million. 500 million users to be exact. That is a whole lot of folks.

  • So many folks in fact that Facebook would be the 3rd largest country in the world just based on all those users. Unfortunately when talking about Facebook Platform I think folks get easily swayed by this large user base. As if that’s the only reason to use it. “Looks, lots of people to market too!”

    But that mindset misses the real power of Facebook Platform. Because, when it really comes down to it, it isn’t really just this mass of 500 million faceless users floating out in the ether of the internet. Instead Facebook is filled with 500 million…


  • …individuals. Individuals that have their own and quite varying…
  • …tastes, …
  • …likes, …
  • …passions, and…
  • …interests.

    And these individuals spend some inordinate amount of time telling Facebook all about themselves. Really they’re telling friends and family what they like, what’s going on in their life but Facebook is quietly compiling all this data. And in the end, after they’ve entered in all this data, what they’ve done for themselves is build…
  • …an identity. I hate to refer to it as an “online” identity because I don’t think a user sees it that way. It’s not virtual. They see what they enter into Facebook as a basically true reflection of themselves. And Facebook users spend a lot time to cultivating these identities by the way, they add to them, prune them and they tend to continue to take an active role in it. 50% of Facebook’s active users log in on any given day. Maybe they login to cultivate their fields in Farmville but they do interact with other people.

    To me, this notion of identity is the first of two core reasons to use Facebook Platform.

    A user’s identity on Facebook can be shallow or deep. It can just be basic information like…

  • …a profile picture…
  • …a hometown…
  • …or more detailed interests like favorite movies, books, music, sports teams, work history,…
  • …and there’s a lot to be learned by the relationships that people have.
  • So why does this identity matter to you? “Great, Facebook users have spent all this time on it but the data is in Facebook?” Let’s walk through what I think is a good example for showing why it can be relevant to your institution.
  • Let’s say you have a plan to engage prospective students for the Class of 2015 with a special site just for them.
  • You read in Noel Levitz 2010 E-Expectations report that 76% of prospects like the idea of a special, separate social network on your site. Taking that bit of data you’re hoping for a better yield by engaging this class early and in the way they said they wanted to. You especially hope to engage higher-ability students. You decide to build the site in-house.
  • You use a traditional plan to advertise the site by using postcards and email addresses based on data you’ve bought or otherwise collected…
  • And maybe the site looks like this. Pretty. Has the ever-present photo of a “girl under a tree” since that’s what all the kids like to see. A prospect is intrigued from a postcard, they see the join button and attempt to do so…
  • … and they get this. Where you ask for basic information like first name, last name, maybe preferred name to make this extra “personal”, you ask for their email address again, obviously we’ll have to confirm that email address just in case the user messed up the first time,
  • maybe we also ask hometown so we can customize the information you show them by location or send them a brochure. then maybe you just have a bunch of non-required but it’d be nice to have questions that admissions wants to collect data on…

    This form… just to create an account, to show some level of interest in a school. Remember, we’re talking about prospects here. It’s overwhelming. Almost exhausting. How many people drop out at this point from considering your school?
  • In that same 2010 E-Expectations report they noted that 1 in 4 students reported removing a school from their prospective list because of a bad experience. These sign-up forms seem like a bad experience to me. I think a lot of folks say, the bad experience must be design or content... maybe it’s registration. At this point I’d love to say and at WVU we see X% bounce rate. Well, it turns out we don’t track analytics on these pages so I don’t know if we have a big bounce rate or not. We’re going to rectify that but I’d be curious to know if others see any source of bounce on these pages...

  • So lets say the main page now looks like this afterwards. Note that is does say a name and there’s a section where you can find friends already on the network. Pretty bland and not much different than the non-customized version even though they spent all that time entering in their information. Pay off for you surely but not for them.

    But let me suggest a different scenario…

  • …and let’s try using Facebook Platform. In that E-Expectations report it was noted that 76 percent of students reported using Facebook so there’s a good chance your prospect will be able to use this feature
  • Also, according to Facebook more than 150 million people engage with Facebook on external websites every month. That number is more than double the number of users using the service just 10 months prior.

  • ...and obviously lets leverage that identity the prospect has already created on Facebook

  • Now instead of just having the regular sign-up form to fill out the user has the option to login with Facebook. So this is using the Authentication feature of Facebook Platform. So after clicking on the Facebook logo, and I’m sure you’ve done this, the user is prompted to give your site access to their information. Assuming the user says yes they’re redirected to facebook to authorize the link to your site and then they get...

  • …back to your main page already filled out and customized. No long form to collect all that data. Your system simply grabs the data from Facebook to customize this page. They’re name, profile pic,their interests, their friends. You can also get their email address, their high school information, birthday, hometown, current location if they’re using places… Just a whole host of data that someone may have filled out. And maybe you notice they they have the interest of National Honor Society. Might be a good way of tagging higher ability kids to interact with. And there’s no reason why this data can’t be leveraged when they finally apply to school.

    The flipside is that you are going to be missing some data as well. Facebook obviously doesn’t have the term that a user is interested in when applying to your school or maybe some other really specific bit of data you want. There’s no reason you couldn’t put up an overlay and ask for that info once the user returns. Keep it short and make sure it’ll add value in the short-term. If you’re not going to customize anything for them based on term don’t ask for it. Is it nice data to have? sure. But you don’t necessarily *need* it. Think about the importance of data before asking for it.

  • So to answer the question I posed earlier “Why does this online identity matter to you?” It lets you create an…

  • … instant-on social experience. It lowers the barrier for your users to start getting to know you and in a way that makes them feel comfortable and included. The first experience with you is a positive one and, hopefully with the halo effect, that informs the rest of their interactions with you and your institution making it that much more likely they apply and then enroll. User experience is everything. It really is a differentiator. Keep that in mind when thinking about the full set of interactions a user will have with you during the get to know you, apply, be admitted and finally enroll in your school path.
  • Three things to note:
  • One, I’m showing you the most labor-intensive use of Facebook Platform here, though, in my mind, this is also the most useful type. Again, this was using the Facebook Platform authentication piece. In the “How” section I’ll touch on some easier tools that you can use called social plugins.
  • Two, the data you collect via Facebook Platform can be stored indefinitely unless the user asks you to delete it. Also, you can only use that data on your website. So, if you get their email address via Facebook Platform you need to get separate permission from the user to send them email per Facebook Platform rules.
  • As I noted earlier it won’t supply all data. And, frankly, some data that you want may be missing. Maybe high school? You just have to keep that in mind when setting up the site.

    So to quickly review what I think is the first core reason for using Facebook Platform…

  • …so Facebook has 500 million individuals who have spent a lot of time developing their identities there. By using Facebook Platform to grab that data we can make our boring websites into attractive, useful and engaging Instant-on Social Experiences.

    Ok, so if identity and then the resulting instant-on social experience is one of the two core reasons to use Facebook platform what’s the second…
  • The second core reason is “Relationships.” On average each user on Facebook has 130 friends. So when these users are having their great instant-on social experience on your site Facebook will help them share their great time via the Like Button and the other social plugins to these connections on Facebook. So not only have you affected or engaged one person but you now have an easy way to influence 130 of their friends.

    And if that person is a prospects then you have a chance to influence 130 other prospects all from a trusted source. So speaking of trusted sources I want to talk about how that works…
  • So there is this 0-1-2 effect and it explains the likelihood of users joining in an online activity based on their friends joining the same online activity. Basically, how likely am I to jump off a bridge because my friends do the same thing. In this example though we’ll use your new prospect site that you’ve built with Facebook Platform.

  • So to explain the 0-1-2 effect I, obviously, have to talk some math. It should be pretty easy math though especially considering it’s about probability, we’re in vegas, and you all boned up on your poker odds before getting here.

    I would like to note before starting this explanation, for my examples I’m going to offer some percentages. They are merely illustrative and are not meant to imply that click through rates for Facebook news feed items are this high. So no tweeting that I think there is some crazy high click through rates, ok? And in this example I haven’t received any emails or postcards from you advertising your new prospect site. The idea is that I’m relying on my friends to influence me to do something…

  • …so the first number is zero. None of my friends have recommended that new prospect site you’ve built with Facebook Platform. Again, I haven’t heard from you either so… out-of-sight, out-of-mind and I’m not joining in on the fun. Pretty simple.
  • Now one of my friends recommends your new prospect site. It shows up in the Facebook news feed of each of their 130 friends including my own. We’ll say the average click through rate on a Facebook news feed item is 5%.

  • So each of us has a 1 in 20 chance of clicking through to your prospect site. As it turns out I’m not one of them. But six of the people who were exposed to that news item did though so not too bad. One recommendation led to the possibility of six new users joining your site.
  • Now two of my friends have recommended your new social experience. On this second go around the odds of me joining are now much, much better. And this is the key point of the 0-1-2 effect. I’m now more than twice as likely to join your online experience as I was after the first recommendation. So the click through rate goes from 5% after that first recommendation to 12.5% for this second one. Just think about a new restaurant in town. Are you a lot more likely to go to it if you have 2 friends recommend as opposed to one? Unless that one happens to be quite the gourmond, yeah, probably.

  • So instead of a 1 in 20 chance there is now a 1 in 8 chance of me joining. I’m intrigued and this time around I join in your social experience. If those two social groups match up exactly between friends (unlikely) you could see 20 people join based on two recommendations.
  • But what if three people recommend your prospect site? Or more for that matter? Obviously it helps but at some point the rate of people joining based on their friends recommendations actually flattens out. Two seems to be the tipping point in terms of getting the most people joining with least number of friends recommending.

  • So what did all that math tell us? Getting that second person in a social group to recommend your site makes a huge difference in getting people to join in online activities. Having this incredibly easy mechanism in Facebook Platform to push back to a users news feed plus that large population of friends that user has gives you the most bang for the buck in terms of the power of recommendation. And if you can couple that recommendation with an easy sign-up prospect on the prospect site? You’ve pretty much struck gold.

  • So to review are to core reasons for using Facebook Platform. We have 500 million individuals who have created identities on Facebook. By using Facebook Platform to grab that data we can make our boring websites into attractive, useful and engaging Instant-on Social Experiences. Then our new users recommend our new prospect site back to their friends via their Facebook news feeds and then we get their friends joining and hopefully the cycle continues.

    While I said there were two core reasons for using Facebook Platform there is actually a third reason to use Facebook Platform so with that let’s segue into…

  • When Matt Arnold and I talked about this conference and what I should give a talk on the big thing for us was something that you all could go back and act on right away. I really want you to see that you can take advantage of this technology starting when you get back into the office on Monday morning. Obviously you won’t be able to roll-out that big prospect site I used as an example earlier but you can at least start getting your feet wet.

  • So again, here are the four parts of Facebook Platform you can take advantage of and I’ve ordered these by how easy they will be to implement at your institution as well as how useful I think they’ll be. I’ll only be discussing the first two because of time constraints. If you have questions about the last two feel free to hit me up after the talk.

  • The best resource for learning more about all of these technologies, including the ones I’m not covering today, is the Facebook Developer site. Just hit up this site and it has a ton of information and examples to lead you through implementing Facebook Platform.

  • Ok, so the first part of Facebook Platform we’ll look at are social plugins. Again, these are by far the easiest to implement feature. For the most part they only require one line of HTML and because the plugins are served by Facebook, you don’t have to worry about any kind of login or authentication for the user. Facebook takes care of all that for you.

    There are eight plugins but for the purpose of this talk I’m only going to talk about five of them. The ones I’ll talk about are:

    •The Like Button
    •The Like Box
    •Recommendations
    •Activity Feed
    •Live Stream

    The three I’m leaving out are:

    •The login button and Facepile which, to me, seem basically pointless.
    And the third is the Comments Box which requires a bit of extra configuration.
  • All of the information regarding these plugins can be found at this site. One of the cooler things about these plugins is that Facebook has…

  • … developed little widget builders. So you visit the site, fill out the required information for the widget, click “Get Code” and you have everything you need to copy and paste into your site. It really doesn’t get much simpler than that.

    Ok, so let’s review each plugin.

  • I think most of us are pretty familiar with the Like button. It shows up on a lot of sites. This example shows our implementation of the Like button on our news site, WVU Today. And if you can’t see it…

  • Here it is circled in red. The Like button lets a user share your content with friends on Facebook. When the user clicks the Like button on your site, a story appears in the user's friends' News Feed with a link back to your website. Simple but definitely an effective way to get users to share your content with others. As for where you can use the like button… At the moment I think it only makes sense on news articles, blogs posts and maybe photos if you have a photo gallery of some kind. For departments and what I would assume they already have a Facebook page and you can’t currently link the Like button with a specific Facebook Page. Instead for that you’d want to use the next Social Plugin, the Like Box.

  • And just so you get an idea of how simple the HTML is here is an example of the code behind a Like button. Again, doesn’t get much easier than that.

  • The Like Box is a social plugin that enables Facebook Page owners to attract and gain Likes directly from their own website. The Like Box enables users to: See how many users already like this page, and which of their friends like it too (0-1-2 effect? Got friends who like it maybe you’re more likely to like the page too?). You can also read recent posts from the page which can be customized on or off. A user can Like the page with one click, without needing to visit your actual page on Facebook. Again, lowering that barrier for participation should encourage more participation.
    Like Boxes should be on your department pages or organizational pages that have related Facebook Pages. There’s no easier way to highlight those Facebook Pages. And if you don’t already have a facebook.institution.edu page get one and put the like box on it.

  • The next social plugin is Recommendations. It shows personalized recommendations to your users. Since the content is hosted by Facebook, the plugin can display personalized recommendations whether or not the user has logged into your site. To generate the recommendations, the plugin considers all the social interactions with URLs from your site. For a logged in Facebook user, the plugin will give preference to and highlight objects her friends have interacted with. You may only want to use this on your main page for your institution but it’s useful in highlighting what’s popular.

  • Related to the Recommendations plugin is the Activity Feed. It even has an option to show recommendations as well as your friends’ activity. The Activity Feed plugin displays the most interesting recent activity taking place on your site. Again, since the content is hosted by Facebook, the plugin can display personalized content whether or not the user has logged into your site. The activity feed displays stories both when users like content on your site and when users share content from your site back to Facebook. If a user is logged into Facebook, the plugin will be personalized to highlight content from their friends. Content that you may have missed in your own news feed but now that you’re on the site the information is not only in front of you - but also relevant to your user experience.
    If the user is logged out, the activity feed will essentially become the recommendations plugin and just show general content from your site, and give the user the option to log in to Facebook.
    One interesting use of this plugin could actually be for monitoring things that people recommend from your own domain as a domain can simply be institution.edu.
    The last social plugin I’m going to cover, Live Stream, is probably the coolest social plugin. In order to use it though you need to grab a Facebook Application ID. So let’s show you how easy it is to do that…
  • First, you go to the developers.facebook.com application set-up page at this address. It simply asks for an app name and an app URL which you can basically make-up. Then you’re asked if you’re human by filling out a captcha.

  • And then here are the results of setting up your Facebook application.
  • And the App ID is the bit circled here. So with the App ID you now use the widget builder to set-up the Live Stream plugin.
  • The Live Stream plugin lets users visiting your site or application share activity and comments in real time. Live Stream works best when you are running a real-time event, like live streaming video for concerts, speeches, webcasts, live Web chats, or webinars. Simply provide your app ID and you can have a chat box that’s integrated with Facebook to support any live event you might be running. And when a user comments on your event that comment can be posted back to Facebook so their friends might see it and join in as well.
    So what kinds of sites are using social plugins & Facebook Platform?
  • Well, two-thirds of comScore’s U.S. Top 100 websites and half of comScore’s Global Top 100 websites have already integrated with Facebook. That’s who.
    And an example of one that I’m sure you’re probably very familiar with is CNN. In 2009, CNN and Facebook enabled millions to experience the Inauguration of Barack Obama with their friends directly on CNN.com and set a new record for the largest live video event in Internet history using the Live Stream plugin. And there were 2 million facebook updates based on the event posted from the plugin.
  • Today CNN.com has a site-wide integration of Facebook’s new social plugins. The enhancements incorporate multiple ways for CNN.com users to seamlessly recommend, share or comment on the news site’s content with their friends on Facebook, as well as see when their friends have recommended, shared or commented on CNN.com content including articles, videos, blogs and iReports.

    In this screenshot of the CNN home page you can see the Activity Feed social plugin. On individual stories they have the “Like Button”.

    So if they’re using it and seeing value in Facebook Platform why not you, right?
  • So after social plugins the next thing you might want to do is directly access user data and create a truly custom solution similar to the one I presented in the prospect site example. For that you’d want to use authentication because the user is going to have to give you permission to access that type of content.
    And this is actually pretty straightforward process. Facebook has done a great job providing tools and documentation. The first of the tools are SDKs:

  • There are multiple SDKs you can use depending on which language you like and the platform you’re developing for:
    •JavaScript
    •PHP
    •Python
    •Android
    •iOS
    For what it’s worth JavaScript seems to be the preferred SDK. I’ve found the PHP SDK pretty straightforward once I properly understood the example. Another tool is the Facebook specific markup language called…
  • Facebook Markup Language, a very original name there, is basically HTML tags that are specific to Facebook and allow you to do some very interesting things really easily and have Facebook do the heavy lifting. It will also be referred to as XFBML. Here’s a quick example of FBML.

  • This creates draws the profile pic for the user id listed. You can also replace that uid with a generic “me” value to draw the profile pic for whomever is logged in. Really simple, right? And the last tool is…
  • FQL, or Facebook Query Language, lets you to use a SQL-style interface to query the data exposed by the Graph API.
    You can specify the response format for the FQL as either XML or JSON depending on the type of data you want and the type of data you feel comfortable handling. There are 49 tables that you can query including the users status, general users info like we discussed earlier in our prospect example, and you can even query if the user is a fan of your facebook page. The user table alone as 52 bits of data you can play with.

  • Hopefully today you’ve learned what facebook platform is, why it’d be good for your institution, in that by leveraging an already created identity it can give you that instant-on social experience and then a user has an easy outlet to share with their 130 closest friends. And then how easy it is to build in the functionality to your site.

  • Again, if you missed it earlier this is the URL for the slidedeck. It’s already up and all the stuff I said, give or take a few words, is available in the notes.

  • Got any questions or comments?
  • My contact info...
  • Thanks! You didn’t really read this note, did you?

Transcript

  • 1. Facebook Platform Dave Olsen, West Virginia University
  • 2. About Me • 8 Years with West Virginia University • Programmer/Project Manager • WVU has 32,000+ students • On Twitter: @dmolsen
  • 3. Presentation available at: slideshare.net/dmolsenwvu
  • 4. www.flickr.com/photos/26760446@N04/3247693174/
  • 5. this past summer www.flickr.com/photos/angelina_creations/4336718492/
  • 6. www.flickr.com/photos/shoobe01/5012487320/
  • 7. What
  • 8. Why
  • 9. How
  • 10. What
  • 11. Pages
  • 12. Groups
  • 13. Places
  • 14. Your Website
  • 15. Your Branding
  • 16. Your Content
  • 17. Your Web Address
  • 18. Facebook Platform makes your website Personalized & Social
  • 19. Social Plugins
  • 20. Social Plugins Authentication
  • 21. Social Plugins Authentication Graph API
  • 22. Social Plugins Authentication Graph API Open Graph Protocol
  • 23. Why
  • 24. 500 million active users www.flickr.com/photos/mrlerone/2543332000/
  • 25. “3rd Largest Country in the World” www.flickr.com/photos/phauly/4350497965/
  • 26. Individuals www.flickr.com/photos/mikedefiant/2113045001/
  • 27. www.flickr.com/photos/toniblay/54611082/ Tastes
  • 28. Likes www.flickr.com/photos/haniamir/2377822286/
  • 29. Passions www.flickr.com/photos/stephenpoff/2495555005/
  • 30. Interests www.flickr.com/photos/orangeacid/3027792757/
  • 31. An Identity
  • 32. Me
  • 33. My Hometown
  • 34. My Interests
  • 35. My Friends & Family (pictures purposefully omitted)
  • 36. Why Does it Matter?
  • 37. Prospect Site our example
  • 38. 76% prospects who want private social network
  • 39. Postcards & Email your communication plan
  • 40. an example prospect site
  • 41. a sign-up form
  • 42. a sign-up form
  • 43. 1 in 4 prospects removed a school based on a bad web experience
  • 44. Let’s Go Back in Time...
  • 45. 76% prospects who use Facebook
  • 46. 150 million users using Facebook on an external site
  • 47. An Identity
  • 48. Postcards & Email your communication plan
  • 49. prospect site with fb sign-in
  • 50. Why Does it Matter?
  • 51. Facebook Platform gives your website an Instant-on Social Experience
  • 52. Caveats there are always some...
  • 53. Labor Intensive great experiences always are
  • 54. Data Usage website only!* * - unless you get explicit permission from the user
  • 55. Won’t Supply All Data you’ll still have to ask for some things
  • 56. Lotsa’ Individuals Developed Identities Facebook Platform Instant-on Social Experience
  • 57. Each Facebook user averages 130 friends www.flickr.com/photos/armitage/48405833/
  • 58. 0-1-2 Effect
  • 59. Math Ahead!
  • 60. 0 recommendations
  • 61. 1 recommendation
  • 62. 1 in 20 I don’t join...
  • 63. 2 recommendations
  • 64. 1 in 8 I’m in!
  • 65. 3+ recommendations
  • 66. Relationships www.flickr.com/photos/armitage/48405833/
  • 67. Lotsa’ Individuals Developed Identities Facebook Platform Instant-on Social Experience Facebook News Feed Friends Joining In
  • 68. How
  • 69. Social Plugins Authentication Graph API Open Graph Protocol
  • 70. developers.facebook.com
  • 71. developers.facebook.com/plugins
  • 72. Social Plugin Builder
  • 73. Like Button Source Code <iframe src="http://www.facebook.com/widgets/like.php?href=http://example.com" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="border:none; width:450px; height:80px"> </iframe>
  • 74. Like Box
  • 75. Recommendations
  • 76. Activity Feed
  • 77. developers.facebook.com/setup to create an application ID
  • 78. Live Stream
  • 79. Authentication
  • 80. JavaScript SDK PHP SDK Python SDK Android SDK iOS SDK
  • 81. FBML
  • 82. <fb:profile-pic uid="12345" linked="true" />
  • 83. FQL
  • 84. What, Why, & How
  • 85. Presentation available at: slideshare.net/dmolsenwvu
  • 86. Questions?
  • 87. Contact Me www.dmolsen.com twitter.com/dmolsen dmolsen@gmail.com
  • 88. Thanks!