From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts
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From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts

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Kudryavtsev, D. V. (2006). From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts, In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Knowledge Management, 6-8 September, 2006, ...

Kudryavtsev, D. V. (2006). From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts, In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Knowledge Management, 6-8 September, 2006, Graz, Austria. – Graz: J.UCS. – P. 97-104.

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From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts Presentation Transcript

  • From context to knowledge: consecutive mapping ontologies and contexts Dmitry Kudryavtsev Saint-Petersburg, Russia 2006
  • Outline
    • General problems of ontology-based knowledge communication
    • Building requirements for effective knowledge communication
    • Practical knowledge communication p roblem – case description
    • Knowledge Navigator – Concept and Framework
    • Task-oriented navigator
    • Role-oriented navigator
    • Conclusions and future work
  • General problems of ontology-based knowledge communication
    • 1. A Content ontology user is
    • unable to set links between
    • his/her task, problem, situation and
    • notions in the Content ontology because of insufficient knowledge
    • 2. A Content ontology user is
    • unable to match
    • his/her personal mental model with the
    • notions in the Content ontology
    • because of semantic and syntactical specialties
    • of a person and ontology-creator.
    All these problems are related with context issues...
  • TWO CONTEXT TYPES
    • Type 1. Context - Model of intended application of a knowledge item
    • … is expressed in terms of the enterprise ontology in knowledge management or e-commerce field
    • This type of context will be considered in the presentation as pragmatic context
    Type 2. Context - Local (not shared) model that encode a party's view of a domain … on the other hand, Ontologies are shared models of some domain that encode a view which is common to a set of different parties. This type of context will be considered in the paper as local context
  • Mapping requirements
    • … is a methodical basis for solving knowledge communication problems
    Requirement 1: Every knowledge resource and corresponding elements of content ontology must be mapped with a pragmatic context . And Requirement 2: Every ontology must be either shared by all the communication participants or be mapped with corresponding local contexts of every participant (group of similar participants). ... guarantee effective knowledge representation R1 R2
  • Practical knowledge communication p roblem – case description
    • Content ontology - EXAMPLE
    • 1. Ideology of Modern Organization
    • 2. Business Engineering as a Management Method
      • 2.1. Business Engineering and Modeling
      • 2.2. Corporate Architecture as a Control Object
      • 2.3. Tools of Business Engineering
    • 3. Strategic Management and Business Development
      • 3.1. Strategic Management Process
      • 3.2. Mission development
      • 3.3. Goal setting
      • 3.4. BSC development
      • 3.5. Strategic control
    • 4. Operational management
      • 4.1. Creating operational model
      • 4.2. Business process modeling
      • 4.3. Business process analysis and improvement
      • 4.4. Project management
    • 5. Supporting activities
      • 5.1. Human resource management
      • 5.2. Knowledge management
    A management consulting company codified the experience of its consultants and received Formalized management methodology (“methodology” hereinafter) as a result. This methodology was further structured using content ontology which consists of topics .
  • Practical knowledge communication p roblem – case description
    • Problem - hard to communicate the management methodology to potential users…
    P1 a. Different organizations that intend to use the methodology face different problems and tasks. Many problems and tasks of organization do not require reading and learning of every topic of methodology, BUT users are unable to do the right choice . P2 P3 b. Target audience (potential users) for the methodology in any organization is very different and involves different people in management procedures (ranging from board of directors to linear managers). Different users categories have to read and learn only a subset of topics, BUT users are unable to do the right choice . c. Words and phrases used in the topic headings can be misunderstood Users will be unable to set a relation between their mental models and topics of the methodology, BUT this infer low motivation and interest.
  • Knowledge Navigator
    • - end-user solution for knowledge communication problems
    • “ External” Framework
    Semantic navigator Task- oriented navigator Role- oriented navigator Content ontology Content Formalized management methodology It helps users to choose topics for learning with respect to Tasks and Problems of organization . It helps users to choose topics for learning with respect to his/her Role in the organization . it helps users to relate topics in authors’ language with their knowledge and thus refines a subset of topics to learn P1 P2 P3
  • Knowledge Navigator - “Internal” Framework Task- oriented navigator Task Context ontology Local Task&Problem Context n Local Task&Problem Context 2 Local Task&Problem Context 1 Content Formalized management methodology Semantic navigator Role- oriented navigator It helps users to choose topics for learning with respect to his/her Role in the organization . it helps users to relate topics in authors’ language with their knowledge and thus refines a subset of topics to learn P2 P3 Content ontology R1 R2
  • Knowledge Navigator - “Internal” Framework Task- oriented navigator Role- oriented navigator Task Context ontology Activity Context ontology Role Context ontology Local Task&Problem Context n Local Task&Problem Context 2 Local Task&Problem Context 1 Content Formalized management methodology Semantic navigator it helps users to relate topics in authors’ language with their knowledge and thus refines a subset of topics to learn P3 Content ontology R1 R2 R1 R1 R2
  • Knowledge Navigator - “Internal” Framework Semantic navigator Task- oriented navigator Role- oriented navigator Content ontology Task Context ontology Activity Context ontology Role Context ontology Local Task&Problem Context n Local Task&Problem Context 2 Local Task&Problem Context 1 Local Content Context n Local Content Context 2 Local Content Context 1 Content Formalized management methodology R1 R2 R1 R1 R2 R2
  • Task-oriented navigator (“What for” – navigator) Users of this navigator do two consecutive mappings, see Step 1 and Step 2 Task Context ontology Content ontology Local Task&Problem Context Step 1 Step 2
  • Task-oriented navigator: Step 1 Task Context ontology Local Task&Problem Context Step 1 In order to help the users identify their local problems every notion in Task Context ontology is mapped with a set of descriptive local task and problem contexts of users. These local contexts are given even in user linguistics. Task 1: To change structures and business processes. Descriptive local task and problem contexts for Task 1 LC 1 You feel the necessity to change organizational structure because it does not correspond to the business processes and market requirements . LC 2 You feel that your company operation is inefficient, and you always encounter the same problems, for example, in processing your clients’ orders. “We either lose clients order, or we have many claims and nobody works with them, or incur costs because we bought non-appropriate raw materials. Such raw materials were bought because we initially planned another kind of production, but such a production plan is a result of a deficient sales plan.” Task 2: To establish order Descriptive local task and problem contexts for Task 2 LC 3 You might have encountered situations of complete chaos resulted from disorganization in your company. These cause the same problems to reoccur . LC 4 The strategy issues are left unheeded in your company. The main question your company managers are faced with is “how to cater to the clients’ order” Task 3 …
  • Task-oriented navigator : Step 2 Task Context ontology Content ontology Step 2
  • Task-oriented navigator - Integration
    • If you face situation similar to LC 1 or LC 2 then you need To establish order according to Step 1.
    • If you need To establish order then according to Step 2:
    • learning topic Ideology of Modern Organization is useful for you
    • learning topic Business Engineering and Modeling is important for you,
    • learning topic Corporate Architecture as a Control Object is useful for you
    • learning topic Tools of Business Engineering is critical for you
    Task Context ontology Content ontology Local Task&Problem Context Step 1 Step 2
  • Role-oriented navigator (“Who” – navigator) Users of this navigator also do two consecutive mappings Role Context ontology Content ontology Activity Context ontology Step 1 Step 2
  • Role-oriented navigator: Step 1 Role Context ontology Activity Context ontology Step 1 Similarly to task-oriented navigator, Role Context ontology is ambiguous and polysemantic for the users, because Roles (notions of Role Context ontology) can bear different responsibilities in different organizations. Thus the Role Context ontology is mapped with the elements derived from the next Pragmatic context - Activity Context ontology. The Activity Context ontology can be considered as shared by potential users, because all the management activities presented are typical for different organizations. • Setting corporate values and principles • Define the business concept and long-term vision • Develop business strategy • Choose and develop methods of management  CEO (Chief Executive Officer) • Perform external and internal analysis of business • Develop business strategy • Develop and set organizational goals  Director of Business Development … other activities and roles.
  • Role-oriented navigator: Step 2 Role Context ontology Content ontology Step 2
  • Role-oriented navigator - Integration
    • If you Perform external and internal analysis of business , Develop business strategy and Develop and set organizational goals then your responsibilities correspond to the role of Director of Business Development based on the consultants’ experience (Step 1).
    • If you comply with this type of a role then according to Step 2:
    • learning topic Ideology of Modern Organization is critical for you
    • learning topic Business Engineering and Modeling is important for you,
    • learning topic Corporate Architecture as a Control Object is useful for you
    Role Context ontology Content ontology Activity Context ontology Step 1 Step 2
  • Conclusions and future work
    • Future work:
    • Establishing and obtaining a feedback on the Knowledge Navigator from the end-users
    • Defining the learning paths (sequence of content ontology elements)
    • Transition of the methodology described above together with KN from the book form into an electronic environment.
    Conclusions: Effective knowledge communication must satisfy two requirements for effective knowledge representation, which are based on mapping between ontologies and context with respect to two types of context .
  • Thanks . Questions ? Dmitry Kudryavtsev [email_address]