The Greek/Latin roots “vis/vid” mean<br />A. see<br />
The Greek/Latin root “spec(i/t)” means…<br />D. Look at, examine<br />
The Greek/Latin roots “aqua/hydr(a/o)” mean…<br />A. water<br />
The Greek/Latin root “auto” means….<br />C. self<br />
The Greek/Latin root “bio” means…<br />B. life<br />
The Greek/Latin root “graph/script/scrib” means…<br />C. write<br />
the basic part of a word that carries meaning<br />A. root<br />
one or more letters placed before the root word or base word that changes the meaning<br />D. prefix<br />
one or more letters placed after the root word or base word that changes the meaning<br />B. suffix<br />
word element, such as a prefix or suffix, that is added before or after a root or base word to modify its meaning<br />A. ...
a set of symbols used to describe sounds<br />C. pronunciation key<br />
indication of which syllables are emphasized when the word is said aloud<br />D. stress marks<br />
indicates how a word is used in a sentence, either as a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb<br />A. part of speech label<br />
a list of undefined words that are a combination of the entry word and familiar endings, also used to indicate how to spel...
indication that there is another entry that sounds the same, but is spelled differently	<br />A. homophone<br />
another entry that is spelled the same but has different meanings<br />D. homograph<br />
genre of written/spoken language artistically arranged into lines instead of sentences, and stanzas instead of paragraphs<...
poetry written to express emotions<br />C. lyric poetry<br />
poetry written to tell a story<br />D. narrative poetry<br />
poetry that has meter and may have rhyme scheme<br />B. traditional poetry<br />
poetry that has no meter or rhyme scheme<br />C. free verse poetry<br />
the rhythm created by the words in a poem<br />A. meter<br />
a regular pattern of rhyming words in a poem<br />D. rhyme scheme<br />
when words rhyme at the end of lines<br />A. end rhyme<br />
when one of a pair of rhyming words is located within the line, not at the end<br />D. internal rhyme<br />
when words almost rhyme<br />B. slant/near rhyme<br />
when words appear as if they should rhyme, but when they are pronounced correctly they do not actually rhyme<br />C. visua...
the dictionary definition of a word, its literal meaning<br />B. denotation<br />
the emotional association(s) or implied meaning beyond the literal meaning of a word<br />A. connotation<br />
a comparison of two things that are essentially different, usually using the word like or as<br />D. simile<br />
a comparison in which the author describes a person or thing using words that are not meant to be taken literally without ...
representing nonhuman things or abstractions (ideas, concepts) as having human qualities<br />A. personification<br />
an intentionally exaggerated figure of speech used for emphasis or effect<br />C. hyperbole<br />
a group of words repeated at key intervals in poetry, similar to the chorus of a song<br />B. refrain<br />
when one thing, usually an object, stands for/represents another thing, usually an idea or concept<br />D. symbol<br />
writing that appeals to one of the five senses to create a vivid (intense, lifelike) image in the reader’s mind<br />C. im...
the idioms, pronunciations, and connotations associated with a language spoken by people in a particular region or by a pa...
repetition of beginning consonant sounds to draw the reader's attention to specific words or to create a sense of imagery<...
repetition of vowel sounds to draw the reader's attention to specific words or to create a sense of imagery<br />B. assona...
the use of words that imitate sounds<br />A. onomatopoeia<br />
a seven-line, diamond-shaped poem<br />B. Diamante<br />
A three-line form of Japanese poetry, traditionally about  nature. <br />A. Haiku<br />
a poem that is written in the shape of the object it is describing, for example a poem about football would be written in ...
a humorous poem with five lines (rhyme scheme AABBA)<br />B. Limerick<br />
a brief, memorial statement for a dead person, often inscribed on a tombstone<br />D. Epitaph<br />
The following is an example of what poetic form? There once was a teacher named Deb,Who came dressed one day as if still i...
The following is an example of what poetic form?				Behind me the moonBrushes shadows of pine treesLightly on the floor.<b...
The following is an example of what poetic form?Here lies red-headed Deb,Who fell off of her horse, then got kicked in the...
OOPS! Nevermind<br />
The following is an example of what type poetic form?         Deborah        Adventurous, DrivenRocking, Skiing, TeachingL...
Based on purpose, “The Highwayman” is a _________________poem.<br />B. Narrative<br />
Based on arrangement, “The Highwayman” is a __________________poem. <br />C. Traditional<br />
briefly restates the main idea/theme and important details<br />B. summary<br />
how to punctuate the title of an entire/ whole work<br />D. underline<br />
how to punctuate the title of a portion of a larger work<br />D. put in quotation marks<br />
what you should do to the first word of the title, and any major/important words<br />A. capitalize<br />
what you should do to articles such as "the", "an", "a" and minor/unimportant words like "with", "or", "and"<br />B. do no...
Which of the following is NOT part of the introduction/exposition of a narrative plot summaryA. characters (protagonist/an...
the time and place in which the action of a narrative occurs<br />C. setting<br />
the character the author is in favor of/focused on<br />A. protagonist<br />
the character in conflict with the protagonist, can be the protagonist himself<br />B. antagonist<br />
the struggle between opposing forces/characters, the problem<br />A.  conflict<br />
Which of the following is NOT a type of conflict?A. Man vs. ManB. Man vs. NatureC. Man vs. RobotsD. Man vs. Himself<br />C...
Which type of conflict is internal?<br />B. man vs. himself<br />
events that lead up to the climax<br />B. complication/rising<br />
the moment in the narrative when the reader knows how the conflict will turn out, frequently the moment of greatest tensio...
Everything that happens after the climax to "wrap up" the narrative<br />A. falling action/denouement<br />
how the conflict turns out, how the problem is solved, or who "wins"<br />C. resolution<br />
the central, universal idea of a piece of nonfiction, the point the author is trying to make<br />C. main idea<br />
the central, universal idea of a piece of fiction, the life-lesson that the reader learns (maybe the same lesson the main ...
the way things really are<br />C. de facto<br />
where you went to school (school that fed you knowledge like a mother feeds her baby)<br />A. alma mater<br />
this for that<br />B. quid pro quo<br />
in the year…, around/about this time<br />A. circa<br />
fake name<br />A. pseudonym<br />
motherhood<br />C. maternity<br />
fatherhood<br />D. paternity<br />
brotherhood<br />B. fraternity<br />
enemy<br />A. nemesis<br />
work done voluntarily for the public good, for free<br />B. pro bono<br />
the current situation, the way things have always been<br />C. status quo<br />
day by day, each day<br />B. per diem<br />
counting by heads, for each person<br />B. per capita<br />
tales that explain the action of gods, goddesses and the human heroes who interact with them while attempting to explain t...
long narrative poem that tells the story of a larger-than-life hero who goes on a dangerous journey or quest<br />A. epic<...
stories based on real life events that, as the story is told and retold, become fictionalized and fantastical<br />C. lege...
type of folk tale that uses hyperbole for comic effect, usually the protagonist is a hero who performs  impossible feats<b...
a brief story featuring animals that speak and which ends with a moral<br />B. fable<br />
in myths and epic tales, when the hero embarks on a journey and faces difficulties while trying to reach a goal or obtain ...
tales that begin and end in the same place<br />A. circle story<br />
lesson about life<br />C. moral<br />
the author of a play<br />A. playwright<br />
the set/group of actors in a play<br />B. cast<br />
the construction on the stage that suggests the time and place of the action (setting)<br />C. scenery/set<br />
small movable item that the actors use to make their actions look realistic<br />D. prop<br />
the text of a play, with dialogue and directions for actors<br />C. script<br />
bracketed information that describes the scenery and how the characters should move and speak<br />B. stage direction<br />
playwright’s technique for creating believable characters<br />A. characterization<br />
a conversation between more than one person/character<br />C. dialogue<br />
a speech by a single person/character, may reveal their private thoughts and feelings or advance the plot<br />B. monologu...
Text organizational pattern in which events or steps are presented in the order in which they occur in time<br />A. chrono...
Text organizational pattern in which the author is explaining the similarities and differences between things<br />C. comp...
Text organizational pattern in which an event which occurs first in time has an impact on and leads to a second event<br /...
Text organizational pattern in which the author gives the reader a mental image or clear understanding of something<br />B...
Text organizational pattern in which the author is making a judgment about things and placing them in order based on the j...
Text organizational pattern in which the author is describing (a) problem(s) and the possible solution(s)<br />D. problem/...
Text organizational pattern which divides or groups a topic into parts that are based on shared or common characteristics<...
Text organizational pattern in which the author is presenting an idea and the reasons why it is a good idea<br />A. propos...
Who is the protagonist in “The Iliad”?<br />C. the Greeks<br />
Who is the antagonist in “The Iliad”?<br />D. the Trojans<br />
What is the main conflict in “The Iliad”?<br />C. Greeks vs. the Trojans for Helen<br />
What is the climax in “The Iliad”?<br />A. when the Greeks came pouring out of the wooden horse<br />
What of the following idioms does not represent a theme in “The Iliad”?<br />D. Forgive and forget.<br />
unrestricted power to act<br />C. carte blanche<br />
region’s style of preparing food<br />B. cuisine<br />
clumsy person<br />D. klutz<br />
castle, fort, country house<br />A. chateau<br />
let the buyer beware<br />A. caveat emptor<br />
I am to blame, apology<br />B. mea culpa<br />
to carry<br />C. schlep<br />
past one’s prime, behind the times<br />D. passe’<br />
extraordinary event<br />D. phenomenon<br />
god of time<br />B. Kronos/Saturn<br />
king of the gods<br />A. Zeus/Jupiter<br />
god of war<br />D. Ares/Mars<br />
god of the sea<br />B. Poseidon/Neptune<br />
king of the underworld<br />C. Hades/Pluto<br />
goddess of love and beauty<br />A. Aphrodite/Venus<br />
messenger of the gods<br />B. Hermes/Mercury<br />
god of love<br />D. Eros/Cupid<br />
Finger:hand :: _______:foot<br />D. toe<br />
Menelaus:Greeks::Priam:______<br />B. Troy<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

1st sem exam rev

399

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
399
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

1st sem exam rev

  1. 1. The Greek/Latin roots “vis/vid” mean<br />A. see<br />
  2. 2. The Greek/Latin root “spec(i/t)” means…<br />D. Look at, examine<br />
  3. 3. The Greek/Latin roots “aqua/hydr(a/o)” mean…<br />A. water<br />
  4. 4. The Greek/Latin root “auto” means….<br />C. self<br />
  5. 5. The Greek/Latin root “bio” means…<br />B. life<br />
  6. 6. The Greek/Latin root “graph/script/scrib” means…<br />C. write<br />
  7. 7. the basic part of a word that carries meaning<br />A. root<br />
  8. 8. one or more letters placed before the root word or base word that changes the meaning<br />D. prefix<br />
  9. 9. one or more letters placed after the root word or base word that changes the meaning<br />B. suffix<br />
  10. 10. word element, such as a prefix or suffix, that is added before or after a root or base word to modify its meaning<br />A. affix<br />
  11. 11. a set of symbols used to describe sounds<br />C. pronunciation key<br />
  12. 12. indication of which syllables are emphasized when the word is said aloud<br />D. stress marks<br />
  13. 13. indicates how a word is used in a sentence, either as a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb<br />A. part of speech label<br />
  14. 14. a list of undefined words that are a combination of the entry word and familiar endings, also used to indicate how to spell the various forms of a word<br />C. run-on entry<br />
  15. 15. indication that there is another entry that sounds the same, but is spelled differently <br />A. homophone<br />
  16. 16. another entry that is spelled the same but has different meanings<br />D. homograph<br />
  17. 17. genre of written/spoken language artistically arranged into lines instead of sentences, and stanzas instead of paragraphs<br />D. poetry<br />
  18. 18. poetry written to express emotions<br />C. lyric poetry<br />
  19. 19. poetry written to tell a story<br />D. narrative poetry<br />
  20. 20. poetry that has meter and may have rhyme scheme<br />B. traditional poetry<br />
  21. 21. poetry that has no meter or rhyme scheme<br />C. free verse poetry<br />
  22. 22. the rhythm created by the words in a poem<br />A. meter<br />
  23. 23. a regular pattern of rhyming words in a poem<br />D. rhyme scheme<br />
  24. 24. when words rhyme at the end of lines<br />A. end rhyme<br />
  25. 25. when one of a pair of rhyming words is located within the line, not at the end<br />D. internal rhyme<br />
  26. 26. when words almost rhyme<br />B. slant/near rhyme<br />
  27. 27. when words appear as if they should rhyme, but when they are pronounced correctly they do not actually rhyme<br />C. visual/eye rhyme<br />
  28. 28. the dictionary definition of a word, its literal meaning<br />B. denotation<br />
  29. 29. the emotional association(s) or implied meaning beyond the literal meaning of a word<br />A. connotation<br />
  30. 30. a comparison of two things that are essentially different, usually using the word like or as<br />D. simile<br />
  31. 31. a comparison in which the author describes a person or thing using words that are not meant to be taken literally without using the words like or as<br />A. metaphor<br />
  32. 32. representing nonhuman things or abstractions (ideas, concepts) as having human qualities<br />A. personification<br />
  33. 33. an intentionally exaggerated figure of speech used for emphasis or effect<br />C. hyperbole<br />
  34. 34. a group of words repeated at key intervals in poetry, similar to the chorus of a song<br />B. refrain<br />
  35. 35. when one thing, usually an object, stands for/represents another thing, usually an idea or concept<br />D. symbol<br />
  36. 36. writing that appeals to one of the five senses to create a vivid (intense, lifelike) image in the reader’s mind<br />C. imagery<br />
  37. 37. the idioms, pronunciations, and connotations associated with a language spoken by people in a particular region or by a particular group of people<br />C. dialect<br />
  38. 38. repetition of beginning consonant sounds to draw the reader's attention to specific words or to create a sense of imagery<br />D. alliteration<br />
  39. 39. repetition of vowel sounds to draw the reader's attention to specific words or to create a sense of imagery<br />B. assonance<br />
  40. 40. the use of words that imitate sounds<br />A. onomatopoeia<br />
  41. 41. a seven-line, diamond-shaped poem<br />B. Diamante<br />
  42. 42. A three-line form of Japanese poetry, traditionally about nature. <br />A. Haiku<br />
  43. 43. a poem that is written in the shape of the object it is describing, for example a poem about football would be written in the shape of a football.<br />C. Concrete/shape<br />
  44. 44. a humorous poem with five lines (rhyme scheme AABBA)<br />B. Limerick<br />
  45. 45. a brief, memorial statement for a dead person, often inscribed on a tombstone<br />D. Epitaph<br />
  46. 46. The following is an example of what poetic form? There once was a teacher named Deb,Who came dressed one day as if still in bed.Her boss got so madHe said, "Enough I have had!" So he fired the teacher named Deb.<br />C. Limerick<br />
  47. 47. The following is an example of what poetic form? Behind me the moonBrushes shadows of pine treesLightly on the floor.<br />A. Haiku<br />
  48. 48. The following is an example of what poetic form?Here lies red-headed Deb,Who fell off of her horse, then got kicked in the head,Now you’re reading this stone cuz she's dead.<br />D. Epitaph<br /> <br />
  49. 49. OOPS! Nevermind<br />
  50. 50. The following is an example of what type poetic form? Deborah Adventurous, DrivenRocking, Skiing, TeachingLake, Classroom, Couch, HouseKnitting, Shopping, Sleeping Sedentary, Old Boredom<br />B. Diamante<br />
  51. 51. Based on purpose, “The Highwayman” is a _________________poem.<br />B. Narrative<br />
  52. 52. Based on arrangement, “The Highwayman” is a __________________poem. <br />C. Traditional<br />
  53. 53. briefly restates the main idea/theme and important details<br />B. summary<br />
  54. 54. how to punctuate the title of an entire/ whole work<br />D. underline<br />
  55. 55. how to punctuate the title of a portion of a larger work<br />D. put in quotation marks<br />
  56. 56. what you should do to the first word of the title, and any major/important words<br />A. capitalize<br />
  57. 57. what you should do to articles such as "the", "an", "a" and minor/unimportant words like "with", "or", "and"<br />B. do not capitalize<br />
  58. 58. Which of the following is NOT part of the introduction/exposition of a narrative plot summaryA. characters (protagonist/antagonist)B. climaxC. conflictD. setting (time/place) <br />B. climax<br />
  59. 59. the time and place in which the action of a narrative occurs<br />C. setting<br />
  60. 60. the character the author is in favor of/focused on<br />A. protagonist<br />
  61. 61. the character in conflict with the protagonist, can be the protagonist himself<br />B. antagonist<br />
  62. 62. the struggle between opposing forces/characters, the problem<br />A. conflict<br />
  63. 63. Which of the following is NOT a type of conflict?A. Man vs. ManB. Man vs. NatureC. Man vs. RobotsD. Man vs. Himself<br />C. Man vs. Robots<br />
  64. 64. Which type of conflict is internal?<br />B. man vs. himself<br />
  65. 65. events that lead up to the climax<br />B. complication/rising<br />
  66. 66. the moment in the narrative when the reader knows how the conflict will turn out, frequently the moment of greatest tension and/or excitement in the story<br />D. climax<br />
  67. 67. Everything that happens after the climax to "wrap up" the narrative<br />A. falling action/denouement<br />
  68. 68. how the conflict turns out, how the problem is solved, or who "wins"<br />C. resolution<br />
  69. 69. the central, universal idea of a piece of nonfiction, the point the author is trying to make<br />C. main idea<br />
  70. 70. the central, universal idea of a piece of fiction, the life-lesson that the reader learns (maybe the same lesson the main character learns)<br />A. theme<br />
  71. 71. the way things really are<br />C. de facto<br />
  72. 72. where you went to school (school that fed you knowledge like a mother feeds her baby)<br />A. alma mater<br />
  73. 73. this for that<br />B. quid pro quo<br />
  74. 74. in the year…, around/about this time<br />A. circa<br />
  75. 75. fake name<br />A. pseudonym<br />
  76. 76. motherhood<br />C. maternity<br />
  77. 77. fatherhood<br />D. paternity<br />
  78. 78. brotherhood<br />B. fraternity<br />
  79. 79. enemy<br />A. nemesis<br />
  80. 80. work done voluntarily for the public good, for free<br />B. pro bono<br />
  81. 81. the current situation, the way things have always been<br />C. status quo<br />
  82. 82. day by day, each day<br />B. per diem<br />
  83. 83. counting by heads, for each person<br />B. per capita<br />
  84. 84. tales that explain the action of gods, goddesses and the human heroes who interact with them while attempting to explain the causes of natural phenomena<br />B. myths<br />
  85. 85. long narrative poem that tells the story of a larger-than-life hero who goes on a dangerous journey or quest<br />A. epic<br />
  86. 86. stories based on real life events that, as the story is told and retold, become fictionalized and fantastical<br />C. legends<br />
  87. 87. type of folk tale that uses hyperbole for comic effect, usually the protagonist is a hero who performs impossible feats<br />D. tall tales<br />
  88. 88. a brief story featuring animals that speak and which ends with a moral<br />B. fable<br />
  89. 89. in myths and epic tales, when the hero embarks on a journey and faces difficulties while trying to reach a goal or obtain an object<br />B. quest<br />
  90. 90. tales that begin and end in the same place<br />A. circle story<br />
  91. 91. lesson about life<br />C. moral<br />
  92. 92. the author of a play<br />A. playwright<br />
  93. 93. the set/group of actors in a play<br />B. cast<br />
  94. 94. the construction on the stage that suggests the time and place of the action (setting)<br />C. scenery/set<br />
  95. 95. small movable item that the actors use to make their actions look realistic<br />D. prop<br />
  96. 96. the text of a play, with dialogue and directions for actors<br />C. script<br />
  97. 97. bracketed information that describes the scenery and how the characters should move and speak<br />B. stage direction<br />
  98. 98. playwright’s technique for creating believable characters<br />A. characterization<br />
  99. 99. a conversation between more than one person/character<br />C. dialogue<br />
  100. 100. a speech by a single person/character, may reveal their private thoughts and feelings or advance the plot<br />B. monologue<br />
  101. 101. Text organizational pattern in which events or steps are presented in the order in which they occur in time<br />A. chronological<br />
  102. 102. Text organizational pattern in which the author is explaining the similarities and differences between things<br />C. compare/contrast<br />
  103. 103. Text organizational pattern in which an event which occurs first in time has an impact on and leads to a second event<br />D. cause/effect<br />
  104. 104. Text organizational pattern in which the author gives the reader a mental image or clear understanding of something<br />B. description/definition<br />
  105. 105. Text organizational pattern in which the author is making a judgment about things and placing them in order based on the judgment<br />C. rank/order of importance/hierarchical<br />
  106. 106. Text organizational pattern in which the author is describing (a) problem(s) and the possible solution(s)<br />D. problem/solution<br />
  107. 107. Text organizational pattern which divides or groups a topic into parts that are based on shared or common characteristics<br />B. classification<br />
  108. 108. Text organizational pattern in which the author is presenting an idea and the reasons why it is a good idea<br />A. proposition/support<br />
  109. 109. Who is the protagonist in “The Iliad”?<br />C. the Greeks<br />
  110. 110. Who is the antagonist in “The Iliad”?<br />D. the Trojans<br />
  111. 111. What is the main conflict in “The Iliad”?<br />C. Greeks vs. the Trojans for Helen<br />
  112. 112. What is the climax in “The Iliad”?<br />A. when the Greeks came pouring out of the wooden horse<br />
  113. 113. What of the following idioms does not represent a theme in “The Iliad”?<br />D. Forgive and forget.<br />
  114. 114. unrestricted power to act<br />C. carte blanche<br />
  115. 115. region’s style of preparing food<br />B. cuisine<br />
  116. 116. clumsy person<br />D. klutz<br />
  117. 117. castle, fort, country house<br />A. chateau<br />
  118. 118. let the buyer beware<br />A. caveat emptor<br />
  119. 119. I am to blame, apology<br />B. mea culpa<br />
  120. 120. to carry<br />C. schlep<br />
  121. 121. past one’s prime, behind the times<br />D. passe’<br />
  122. 122. extraordinary event<br />D. phenomenon<br />
  123. 123. god of time<br />B. Kronos/Saturn<br />
  124. 124. king of the gods<br />A. Zeus/Jupiter<br />
  125. 125. god of war<br />D. Ares/Mars<br />
  126. 126. god of the sea<br />B. Poseidon/Neptune<br />
  127. 127. king of the underworld<br />C. Hades/Pluto<br />
  128. 128. goddess of love and beauty<br />A. Aphrodite/Venus<br />
  129. 129. messenger of the gods<br />B. Hermes/Mercury<br />
  130. 130. god of love<br />D. Eros/Cupid<br />
  131. 131. Finger:hand :: _______:foot<br />D. toe<br />
  132. 132. Menelaus:Greeks::Priam:______<br />B. Troy<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×