WBS Principles
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WBS Principles

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The work breakdown structure

The work breakdown structure

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WBS Principles WBS Principles Presentation Transcript

  • The Work Breakdown Structure An Easy But Powerful Technique
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
      • A hierarchical outline (map) that identifies the products (deliverables) and work elements involved in a project;
      • Defines the relationship of the final deliverable (the project) to its sub deliverables, and in turn, their relationships to work packages (collection of elements related to work that must be done);
      • Best suited for design and build projects that have tangible outcomes rather than process-oriented projects.
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
      • A work package is just a collection of activities and tasks that fit together logically and could be “ring fenced” to assign to a responsible person
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
      • In order to create the WBS you have to understand the difference between deliverable and activity
    Deliverable = product or output. Written as if it has been produced already – thus usually phrased in the past tense (example" assembly completed”)
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
      • In order to create the WBS you have to understand the difference between deliverable and activity
    More important a deliverable does not consume time and resources (because they are produced through activities/tasks)
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
      • In order to create the WBS you have to understand the difference between deliverable and activity
    An activity/task is what you do to deliver (produce a deliverable) As such it does consume time and resources
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) In Essence: Decomposition of: Final deliverable to Sub deliverable to Activities