• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Big Facilitation Skills Presentation
 

Big Facilitation Skills Presentation

on

  • 8,084 views

Big Facilitation Skills Presentation

Big Facilitation Skills Presentation

Statistics

Views

Total Views
8,084
Views on SlideShare
8,045
Embed Views
39

Actions

Likes
6
Downloads
522
Comments
3

3 Embeds 39

http://www.slideshare.net 33
http://baridoo.com 5
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

13 of 3 previous next Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Good one can i have soft copy on karvesumit@gmail.com plz
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Very detailed
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Very Helpfull
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Big Facilitation Skills Presentation Big Facilitation Skills Presentation Presentation Transcript

    • FACILITATION SKILLS
      • A Skills Development Program
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    •  
      • Facilitate..
      • "to free from difficulties or obstacles; make easier, aid, assist."
      • The role of the facilitator - to design and coordinate a process that helps a group accomplish, while optimizing group functioning
      • The facilitator is a neutral guide who takes an active role in guiding the process while adhering to principles of effective facilitation.
    • Facilitate.. The role of the facilitator is to coordinate the exchange by prescribing procedural steps, initiating and guiding discussion and by adjusting procedures during a workshop to fit the personal, cultural and professional characteristics of participants
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    • Facilitation is about change
    • Facilitation is about change
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
      • Applications of Facilitation:
        • Analysis and action research
        • Structured decision making
        • Planning in all its forms
        • Problem solving
        • Conflict resolution, mediation, negotiation
        • Learning (training and development)
        • Team development
      • Benefits of Facilitation:
        • Improving decision making
        • Improving group dynamics
        • Assisting decision makers through change process
        • Creative problem solving
        • Achieving common focus and priorities for groups with divergent views
        • Challenging existing paradigms
        • Improved planning;
        • Higher levels of buy in and ownership for planning and change.
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    •  
    • Characteristics of a good facilitator 1. Enjoy working with , and helping people to feel good about themselves and achieve their desired results; 2. Ability to analyze comments, understand how they relate to the topic, and develop appropriate responses; 3. Communicate clearly by making specific, concise points, using appropriate levels of energy to build excitement and enthusiasm; 4. Practice active listening by engaging a speaker, listening attentively, and asking probing questions; 5. Convey warmth to others by using smiles, praises, and gestures in one-on-one and group interactions; 6. Demonstrate self-confidence and leadership when working with others, being the person others look to for direction and counsel; 7. Have a business-orientation with an interest in finding methods to improve the way things are done, looking beyond the narrow focus of a job to the greater scope of the business.
    •  
    • Competencies of a good facilitator
      • Workshop design
      • Coordinate discussion to logical conclusion
      • Use tools and techniques to create a participative environment e.g. ice breakers, games, activities using drawings, diagrams, role play, discussions in pairs, small groups etc
      • Creating an atmosphere of trust, confidence and support
      • Promoting empowerment of participants, and being able to let go and trust the group
      • Transferring a sense of ownership and responsibility to the participants
      • Exercise effective listening
      • Use micro facilitation skills to move discussion to a desired conclusion (example, paraphrasing)
      • Use tools and techniques for analysis, problem solving, generating creative solutions, prioritizing and decision making
      • Communicating verbally (including making presentations) and in writing.
    • Habits of a good facilitator Habit #1 : Be Proactive. Take responsibility. Habit #2: Begin With The End In Mind. Decide first what the outcome of the workshop should be. Habit # 3 : Put First Things First. Preparation and logistics are as important as the process; Habit #4: Think Win/Win. Seek solutions so everyone wins; Habit #5: Seek First to Understand. Listen until you understand; Habit #6 : Synergize. Cooperate creatively. Create a climate where people can “speak out”; Habit #7 is Renewal. Facilitation is like golf – you always have something to learn (stay humble).
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Trusts the process;
      • Believing that groups can make good decisions;
      • Ensuring participation;
      • Be a neutral guide;
      • Foster group work;
      • Using effective processes;
      • Harnessing diversity;
      • Builds trust;
      • Goal orientated, and
      • Learn from experience.
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    • Emotional Intelligence: “ The capacity to handle your own emotions and your relationships with others.” U.S. News & World Report “The Secret Skill of Leaders” 1/14/2002
      • Emotional high jacking:
      • Heart 10 beats per minute above resting rate - can jump 30 beats per minute within single heart beat;
      • Body pumping adrenaline and other disruptive hormones;
      • Swamped by toxic/angry feelings;
      • Thinking distorted, difficulty organizing thoughts and feeling overwhelmed.
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    • Ninety percent of executives rate themselves as effective communicators. Only thirty percent of their subordinates agree.
    • Facts alone seldom persuade and rarely inspire; To communicate effectively you need to have the skills of a story teller.
    • Let us remember those who…
    • How big is an acre of land.. The size of a football field
    • Communication
    • “ What we sell is the opportunity for a 43 year-old accountant to dress up in black leather, ride through small towns and have people be afraid of him.”
      • It is forbidden to steal hotel towels please. If you are not the person to do such a thing please do not read this notice – Hotel in Tokyo;
      • The manager has personally passed the water served here – Hotel in Acapulco;
      • You are invited to take advantage of the chambermaid – Hotel in Tokyo;
      • Drop your trousers here for best results – Dry cleaner in Bangkok.
    • The language of influence - presuppositions
      • “ If the cat meows, again, I’ll have to put him outside.”
      • “ It was her friendly smile that made me walk up and say ‘Hey’.”
      • “ If only he had come home on time, the party wouldn’t have gotten out of control.”
      • “ People have always given me more to do than I can handle.”
      • “ P.R. people are always easy-going.”
      • “ Stop watching so closely, and listen to me.”
      • “ Not only you can learn this.”
      • “ Either she goes crazy or I do.”
      • “ First the winds came then the rain.”
      • “ Opera makes me want to cry.”
    • The language of influence Mind Reading: Claiming to know the thoughts or feelings of another without specifying the process by which you came to know the info. • "I know that you are wondering..."
    • The language of influence Lost Per formative: Value judgments where the performer of the value judgment is left out. • "And it’s a good thing to wonder..."
    • The language of influence Complex Equivalence: Where two things are equated - as in their meanings being equivalent. • "That means..."
    • Program Content
      • Definition of facilitation
      • Facilitation is about change
      • Applications and benefits of facilitation
      • Characteristics and competencies of the facilitator
      • Key principles of quality facilitation
      • Basics of understanding people
      • Basics of communication
      • The anatomy of the facilitation process
    •  
      • Process only
      • (pure facilitation)
      Content only (presentation skills)
    •  
      • Invitations include:
        • Letter of invitation
        • Purpose of workshop
        • Agenda
        • Date and times
        • Venue
        • Arrangements for sleep over, sustenance etc
      • Coordinate and confirm
        • Venue
        • Dates and times for tea, meals etc
        • Equipment required
        • Business required
        • Treatment of VIP's
      • Pre workshop inspections and meetings to confirm all logistical arrangements
    •  
      • Registering of candidates - proper desk and administrative assistance;
      • Personal reception - ensure that all delegates are settled;
      • Brief delegates re:
        • Meals. teas, times;
        • Sleep-over arrangements if applicable.
    •  
      • Proper introductions;
      • Allow for rituals without being offensive to certain sections of the group.
      • Introductions accomplish many things for the session participants: -
        • they break the ice,
        • help form relationships and trust, and
        • provide information to help the team form and norm.
        • For facilitators, introductions also add value by providing insight into participant personality, interest level, and biases.
      • They encourage buy-in to the process and assist in the review of concepts and issues.
      • Introductions are powerful tools that every facilitator should exploit.
      • Do an introduction at the start of each session;
      • Pick people from various locations in the room when soliciting volunteers; don't "go around the room" and let the person at the very end of the line get nervous waiting for his or her turn;
      • Make introductions fun and non-threatening;
      • Listen to what is said, and
      • Use the information to ensure session success.
      • Ask participants to state their names, area of responsibility, years with the company, expectations for the session, and a one-word description of themselves. Write the expectations on a flip chart; keep a running total of the of years of experience.
      • Purpose: a low risk introduction to use when the group is first getting together; provides participants with basic information; gives group a sense of the group's total experience level; gives the facilitator insight into what to expect.
      • Welcome Mat:
        • Create a welcome mat using a piece of flipchart paper.
        • Tom wrote “Welcome”, “Relax” and “Have Fun” on the flipchart paper and drew a graphic of a happy person.
        • Place it on the floor where people have to step on it.
      • I found myself stopping to read it, smiling at its silliness and then walking on into the room with a more “at ease” feeling.
      • Pair up the participants, preferably with people they don't know. Ask participants to interview each other on several topics: name, title, expected contribution to the session, family, home, hobbies, interests. Each interviewer introduces his partner to the group;
      • Purpose: a fun, non-threatening way to get participants to open up more and to get to know each other on many levels, including non-work areas; especially useful if the group is going to meet over a long period of time; encourages individuals to put "skin in the game" during the session by focusing on what they bring to the table.
      • Ask participants to share an observation about a previous session - something they learned, a question, a metaphor to describe their feelings, or a symbol that describes the progress of the group;
      • Purpose: a way to build on relationships, provide continuity between sessions, check for understanding, demonstrate expertise, provide insight into how participants are feeling and relating to each other.
      • State purpose;
      • Outline agenda;
      • Allow adoption of the agenda.
      • Ensure that in any icebreaker, game, exercise you have the participants engage in has a purpose and that you emphasize that point when the exercise is complete. Most people don’t feel they have time for games.
      • Enable the group to raise issues - in a non-judgmental fashion;
      • At this point only allow questions for clarification;
      • Use appropriate facilitation techniques - brainstorming; Nominal Group Technique; SWOT Analysis; Projective Techniques.
    •  
    • Brain storming
    • Nominal Group Technique
    • Projective techniques
    •  
      • Paraphrasing – Re stating to reflect meaning, and test own understanding
      • Rephrasing – Phrasing in own words to make understanding clearer for all and identifying the essence of what is being said
      • Summary – Taking the essence at the end of a discussion and using it not only for clarification, but also to gain commitment and approval to move the discussion forward.
    •  
      • Agenda (50/50);
      • Preparation:
        • Logistics;
        • Knowledge and understanding.
      • “ Gestalt”
      • Silences;
      • Nerves;
      • Language;
      • Process suggestions from the group;
      • What is the group saying to you;
      • Self awareness;
      • Control, time etc;
      • Problem people;
      • Conflict
      • Acknowledge:
      • The process;
      • The people.
      • Allow issues to be raised;
      • Allow discussion of issues;
      • Allow decision making;
      • Allow next steps;
      • Allow closure
      • What knowledge do I have ?
      • What is my mindset in preparing ?
      • What reference materials are to be consulted? (Local and National)
      • Are there previous workshop agendas/outputs or research findings?
      • What literature/documents should I research ?
      • What videos and other resource materials etc might be consulted
      • What materials are already available within the organization ?
      • Which local 'experts' might be usefully consulted?.
      • What do the delegates/trainees know?
      • Has a needs analysis already been done ?;
      • Can you visit some delegates/trainees in their workplace to get a better feel for their mindsets and needs ?;
      • What about their customers/clients ? Is research required ?;
      • Is there a need to workshop and agree the agenda up front.
        • Willingness;
        • Equal number of participant groupings;
        • Ideally 15 to 20;
        • Project sponsor;
        • Clients and/or potential clients or suppliers ;
        • Potential customers;
        • Known adversaries of the subject;
        • Officials controlling service delivery and budgets;
        • Employees/members.
      • The facilitation will take place in a building. Some buildings are more appropriate than others. Here is a checklist of things to think about:
      • Heating: does it exist and who is responsible for turning it on?
      • Lighting: is this adequate and are there blackout facilities if you need to show a film?
      • Electricity: where are the sockets, will you need an extension cable and adapter?
      • Furniture: are there enough chairs and tables and is it OK to shift them around?
      • Walls: is it OK to stick things on the walls or will you have to bring flip chart stands?
      • Equipment: what equipment is available, is it working, are there spare bulbs, TV aerial?
      • Kitchen: can food be prepared at the venue (are there cups etc) or will they have to be brought in?
      • Toilets: do they exist, are they clean, is there toilet paper, will they be open?
      • Access :is it easy to find or will participants need a map? Car parking? Disabled access?
    •  
      • The materials and equipment that you need will depend on the methods that you use. Some will be needed for preparation (e.g. computer, printer and photocopiers) and others during the workshop itself. No list of these things would ever be complete but here are some ideas for starters - you can brainstorm and categorize your own checklist!
      • Equipment and Materials:
        • Blackboard/ Whiteboard;
        • Flip chart stand;
        • Overhead projector;
        • Film/ Slide projector;
        • TV/ Video and remotes
        • Cassette/ CD players
        • Sound system and Microphones;
        • Video camera;
        • Chalk (white/colored);
        • Felt pens (water/ spirit);
        • Flip charts.
      • Transport
      • Access roads;
      • Sleepover.
      • Sellotape/ masking tape
      • Drawing Pins
      • Post-it pads
      • Pens/pencils
      • Rulers/ geometry sets
      • Calculators
      • Scissors
      • Stapler/ staples
      • Writing paper
      • Folders/ files
      • Overhead Transparencies
      • Slides/ videos/ cassettes
      • Storage boxes
      • Attendance register
      • Expense claim forms
    • “ There is no use trying,” said Alice. “One can’t believe impossible things.” “I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” Lewis Carroll