Promoting Safety for the Whole Child Presented by Deanna E. Mayers
WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES AND FEARS ABOUT EDUCATING THE WHOLE CHILD? <ul><li>Type your fears in RED and Type your hopes in GREEN...
Safety and Whole Child Education <ul><li>“ Each student learns in an intellectually challenging environment that is physic...
To ensure that all students are safe, ASCD recommends: <ul><li>Students, school staff, and family members establish and ma...
Facts <ul><li>87% of all youth ages 12 through 17 or 21 million teens use the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Nineteen percent ...
Facts <ul><li>65% of high school students admit to unsafe, inappropriate, or illegal activities online </li></ul><ul><li>S...
Why does bullying happen? <ul><li>Reasons Students Are Bullied </li></ul><ul><li>Students perceived that “being overweight...
First Steps to stop bullying… <ul><li>Identifying where, when, and how students experience bullying at your school </li></...
The Triple Challenge
Steps to Safety <ul><li>Learn the Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Community Parent Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Social and Emoti...
Where can BSN help? <ul><li>Internet and Cyber Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Cyber Bullying </li></ul><ul><li>Course Safety con...
Policy against cyber bullying <ul><li>Formulate clear guidelines to protect students and teachers against cyber bullying a...
Learn the Tools <ul><li>Familiarize themselves about all aspects of computer technology, including the mechanics of the In...
Effective use of the Internet <ul><li>Guide teachers and students on how the Internet can serve as effective educational t...
Social-Emotional Education <ul><li>Integrate social-emotional education into the curriculum. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project...
Community Partnerships <ul><li>Form a technology team that comprises staff members, parents and students to act in an advi...
Parent outreach <ul><li>Conduct orientation sessions for parents regarding student use of the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>U...
The Internet at Home <ul><li>Reinforce these guidelines with parents and encourage vigilance of Internet use at home, incl...
Course Safety <ul><li>Each course has a section devoted to course information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent information an...
Steps to Whole Child Education in your district Or classroom…
Review of Step One:  Form a Good working group <ul><li>Ask your local school board to pass the resolution supporting educa...
Step Two:  Think and Act Locally <ul><li>Approach local government to embrace the whole child resolution </li></ul><ul><li...
Step 3: Spread the Word <ul><li>Ask friends and neighbors to sign the whole child petition </li></ul><ul><li>Attach the re...
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Whole Child Safety

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Whole Child Safety

  1. 1. Promoting Safety for the Whole Child Presented by Deanna E. Mayers
  2. 2. WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES AND FEARS ABOUT EDUCATING THE WHOLE CHILD? <ul><li>Type your fears in RED and Type your hopes in GREEN on the white board now. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  3. 3. Safety and Whole Child Education <ul><li>“ Each student learns in an intellectually challenging environment that is physically and emotionally safe for students and adults. “ </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.wholechildeducation.org/about/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>About two-thirds (62 percent) of high school dropouts say their schools should have done more to enforce classroom discipline ( Civic Enterprises and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation ). </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  4. 4. To ensure that all students are safe, ASCD recommends: <ul><li>Students, school staff, and family members establish and maintain behavioral expectations, rules, and routines </li></ul><ul><li>Families are welcomed by school staff as partners in their children's education </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  5. 5. Facts <ul><li>87% of all youth ages 12 through 17 or 21 million teens use the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Nineteen percent (4 million) keep a blog and 38% read blogs </li></ul><ul><li>49% of high school students have posted personal information on their Web pages such as name, age, or address – that could help a stranger identify or locate them </li></ul><ul><li>50% of high school students “talk” in chat rooms or use instant messaging with Internet strangers </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  6. 6. Facts <ul><li>65% of high school students admit to unsafe, inappropriate, or illegal activities online </li></ul><ul><li>Students are increasing their use of technology at a rapid pace in all grades. This includes using the Internet for research, and doing multimedia presentations for schoolwork </li></ul><ul><li>23% of students know someone who has been bullied online. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  7. 7. Why does bullying happen? <ul><li>Reasons Students Are Bullied </li></ul><ul><li>Students perceived that “being overweight” and “not dressing right” were the most common reasons an individual might be bullied. </li></ul><ul><li>Students' Reactions to Bullying </li></ul><ul><li>The most common strategies students reported using when confronted by bullies were walking away, saying mean things back, hitting back, or telling the bully to stop. </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate Adult Response </li></ul><ul><li>Most students said they were not confident that adults could protect them from being bullied. </li></ul>How We Treat One Another in School Donna M. San Antonio and Elizabeth A. Salzfass May 2007 | Volume 64 | Number 8
  8. 8. First Steps to stop bullying… <ul><li>Identifying where, when, and how students experience bullying at your school </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize and name all forms of bullying. </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Triple Challenge
  10. 10. Steps to Safety <ul><li>Learn the Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Community Parent Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Social and Emotional Activities in Courses </li></ul><ul><li>Effective Use of the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Policy/rules specific to bullying </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  11. 11. Where can BSN help? <ul><li>Internet and Cyber Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Cyber Bullying </li></ul><ul><li>Course Safety concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Training Teachers and other staff </li></ul><ul><li>Parent outreach </li></ul><ul><li>Intentional design of social interaction in courses </li></ul>
  12. 12. Policy against cyber bullying <ul><li>Formulate clear guidelines to protect students and teachers against cyber bullying and other criminal activities </li></ul><ul><li>Implement an anti-bullying policy. </li></ul><ul><li>Train all school employees on the policy and the discipline procedures that goes with this </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  13. 13. Learn the Tools <ul><li>Familiarize themselves about all aspects of computer technology, including the mechanics of the Internet, blogs, social networking Web sites, and the liability issues associated with the use of these technologies </li></ul><ul><li>NACOL lists the ability to monitor and facilitate appropriate interaction among students as a quality standard of online teaching. </li></ul><ul><li>BSN offers many forms of professional development FREE to its members to help with this. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  14. 14. Effective use of the Internet <ul><li>Guide teachers and students on how the Internet can serve as effective educational tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher training on how to be an effective online teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet Safety Professional Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scholar bookmark streams </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NACOL sites effective use of synchronous and asynchronous tools and appropriate online etiquette as a quality standard of online teaching . </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  15. 15. Social-Emotional Education <ul><li>Integrate social-emotional education into the curriculum. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Projects focus on self-understanding, understanding of others, appreciation for diversity, and responsibility to the community. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Learning opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NACOL lists the ability to create a warm inviting atmosphere in the course as a quality standard of online teaching. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  16. 16. Community Partnerships <ul><li>Form a technology team that comprises staff members, parents and students to act in an advisory capacity to the larger school community </li></ul><ul><li>Courses all have safety information provided for the parent, teacher and students that is pertinent to the course materials </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on school-wide relationships, not only on student bullying. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  17. 17. Parent outreach <ul><li>Conduct orientation sessions for parents regarding student use of the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Use the blackboard as a resource to create a course that is guest accessible by parents to post information and resources to protect their students </li></ul><ul><li>Help the bullied and the bullies. </li></ul><ul><li>Parent access to content in Blackboard </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  18. 18. The Internet at Home <ul><li>Reinforce these guidelines with parents and encourage vigilance of Internet use at home, including the elimination of derogatory statements against other students or staff. </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  19. 19. Course Safety <ul><li>Each course has a section devoted to course information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent information and connections section </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safe Internet Research guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proper social collaboration tool etiquette </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety in using course materials, activities, experiments. </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Steps to Whole Child Education in your district Or classroom…
  21. 21. Review of Step One: Form a Good working group <ul><li>Ask your local school board to pass the resolution supporting education of the whole child. </li></ul><ul><li>Present the whole child resolution for reading and offer to speak to the board concerning the need for such a movement </li></ul>
  22. 22. Step Two: Think and Act Locally <ul><li>Approach local government to embrace the whole child resolution </li></ul><ul><li>Ask the school board to recommend other local officials or interest groups that they think would support the project </li></ul>
  23. 23. Step 3: Spread the Word <ul><li>Ask friends and neighbors to sign the whole child petition </li></ul><ul><li>Attach the resolution and petition and take to any local social events and meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Submit letters to the editor in the local newspaper </li></ul>Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)

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