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Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
Whole Child Healthy
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Whole Child Healthy

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Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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Transcript

  • 1. The Healthy and Whole Child Presented by Deanna E. Mayers
  • 2. WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES AND FEARS ABOUT EDUCATING THE WHOLE CHILD?
    • Type your fears in RED and Type your hopes in GREEN on the white board now.
  • 3. Health and Whole Child Education
    • To ensure that all students are healthy, ASCD recommends four steps:
      • Students are routinely screened for immunizations and vision, hearing, dental, and orthopedic concerns
      • Schools have a health advisory council with students, family, community and business members
      • Healthy food choices are available at school
      • Physical education and health classes emphasize lifetime healthy behaviors
  • 4. Screening for Health
    • Students are routinely screened for immunizations and vision, hearing, dental, and orthopedic concerns
    • Do you have a Nurse that follows this up?
    • Do you have a dental hygienist or doctor come in for physicals and check-up for those who can not afford this?
  • 5. Advisory Council
    • Schools have a health advisory council with students, family, community and business members
    • Perhaps create BSN accounts for your advisory council and create a course in the system to share resources
    • Online communication may get more involvement that arranging face to face meetings
    • Use Wimba classroom for live meetings to take meeting physically and travel concerns
    • Make certain to meet the first time face to face to gain an initial relationship
  • 6. Healthy Food Choices
    • Healthy food choices are available at school
    • One of four students buy unhealthy choices, and most of these were bought from the school cafeteria
    • Most school lunch programs depend in part to the sales to support the program and staff, so we need to snacks that students want to purchase
    • Work with your advisory team and your school lunch coordinator to come up with some healthy choices that students will choose to purchase and also allow for a reasonable profit margin
    SCHOOL FOOD UNWRAPPED: WHAT’S AVAILABLE AND WHAT OUR KIDS ACTUALLY ARE EATING By Elizabeth Hair, Ph.D., Thomson Ling, and Laura Wandner November 2008
  • 7. Lifetime Healthy Behaviors
    • Physical education and health classes emphasize lifetime healthy behaviors
      • Blendedschools.net will be releasing a high school fitness and wellness course
      • Developing elementary health courses
      • Adding to health and fitness content for middle school students
  • 8. Learning Object Challenge
    • Topics needed:
    • Health
      • Grades 2-5
    • Elementary Science
      • Grades 2-5
    • Elementary Language Arts (word wall words, phonetics, grammar, etc)
      • Grades K-5
    • All must be:
    • Aligned to PA and national standards
    • Submitted in the Learning Objects submission library
    • Engaging activities designed to deliver instruction or remediate skills or knowledge
    • Use BSN approved development tools
  • 9. How to get involved?
    • All Learning Object developers for this project must:
      • attend the online training for Learning Objects on April 29, 2009 at 3:30
      • OR
      • View the archive of the session and complete a short quiz at the end of the viewing.
  • 10. How to submit a Learning Object for this project
    • All submissions will be evaluated by the rubric shared with developers during the training
    • The best 150 learning objects will earn the developer a minimum of $40 with up to $100 possible.
    • The best learning object developed will win a Flip video camera
    • Each developer can submit up to 10 entries, but no more, so pick only your best learning objects to submit!
  • 11. Steps to Whole Child Education in your district Or classroom…
  • 12. Review of Step One: Form a Good working group
    • Ask your local school board to pass the resolution supporting education of the whole child.
    • Present the whole child resolution for reading and offer to speak to the board concerning the need for such a movement
  • 13. Step Two: Think and Act Locally
    • Approach local government to embrace the whole child resolution
    • Ask the school board to recommend other local officials or interest groups that they think would support the project
  • 14. Step 3: Spread the Word
    • Ask friends and neighbors to sign the whole child petition
    • Attach the resolution and petition and take to any local social events and meetings
    • Submit letters to the editor in the local newspaper
    Internet Safety Policy Recommendations. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), 2007. (web commentary)
  • 15. Step 4: Make Friends
    • Tap into groups of community stakeholders with ready made audiences who are interested in Whole Child
    • Parents
    • Businesses
    • Doctors, health care
    • Education groups
  • 16. Step Five
    • Know that you may win some and lose some
    • If you are unsuccessful getting support from an official, perhaps ask someone else to speak with them using a different approach
    • If that doesn’t work, agree to disagree and move along

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