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In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences
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In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences

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how to think conceptually the human dynamics …

how to think conceptually the human dynamics
considering humans as agents of multiple
complex systems that they are part of
– which analytical dimensions that we must
take into consideration for building an efficient
method to research human dynamics

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  • 1. In search of a model of human dynamics analysis applied to social sciences Dalton Lopes Martins dmartins@gmail.com Federal University of Goiás Student Conference on Complexity Science (SCCS) University of Sussex Brighton United Kingdom 2014 Image by: Marc Ngui - http://athousandplateaus-drawings.tumblr.com/
  • 2. Who I am ● Dalton Martins – PhD in Information Science – Federal University of Goias ● Information and Communication LAB – Working with: ● Information management ● Infometrics,Scientometrics ● Human Dynamics ● Social networks LABICOM - UFG
  • 3. Human Dynamics ● 2 questions drives my research: – how to think conceptually the human dynamics considering humans as agents of multiple complex systems that they are part of – which analytical dimensions that we must take into consideration for building an efficient method to research human dynamics
  • 4. Human Dynamics ● Definition of complex system: – “A system in wich large networks of components with no central control and simple rules of operation give rise to complex collective behavior, sophisticated information processing, and adaptation via learning or evolution” (Mitchell, 2009). – “Systems in wich organized behavior arises without an internal or external controller or leader are sometimes called self-organizing” (Mitchell, 2009). – It'a a tradition to think in complex systems without an internal or external controller or leader. ● But, in terms of Human Dynamics: – Culture, habits, power structures could not be thought of as something that exerts some kind of control or driving behavior?
  • 5. 3 analytical dimensions ● Philosophical – explanatory models of human behavior ● Mathematical – strategies to analyze and describe the human dynamics ● Technological – strategies to collect, process, and visualize data from social interactions
  • 6. philosophical dimension ● Dispositif – A fundamental concept to my research; – Michel Foucault generally uses the term "dispositif," to refer to the various institutional, physical, and administrative mechanisms and knowledge structures which enhance and maintain the exercise of power within the social body; – Represents discursive and non discursive human practices; – Machines that make something visible and speakable
  • 7. philosophical dimension ● Dispositif as practices – “A practice is a preconceptual, anonymous, socially sanctioned body of rules that govern one's manner of perceiving, judging, imagining and acting” (Flynn, 2003). – “Foucault describes practice as the point of linkage of what one says and what one does, of the rules one prescribes to onesef and the reasons one ascribes, of projects and of evidences” (Flynn, 2003). – “Practices establish and apply norms, controls, and exclusions; on the other, they render true/false discourse possible” (Flynn, 2003).
  • 8. philosophical dimension ● Dispositif – 4 lines could be used to describe a dispositif (Deleuze, 1990) ● Visibility – Wich allows the dispositif to be visible ● Enunciation – Wich allows the dispositif to be speakble ● Forces – words and things to be affirmed ● Subjectivity – Modes of life
  • 9. philosophical dimension Dispositifs as practices which makes the difference: complex natural and human systems Image Source: http://serc.carleton.edu/details/images/23167.html
  • 10. philosophical dimension ● My research proposes: – We study the human dynamics from the analysis of the dispositifs that emerge in the social field. – The dispositifs form patterns of relationships and relational practices that can be studied and described by mathematical and technological tools – We should be able to create analytical methods that use these 4 lines as a means to understand and describe what emerges from the dynamic human processes.
  • 11. Mathematical and technological dimension: a propose of a framework Lines to describe a dispositf objects of study mathematical resources technological resources Visibility documents natural language modeling data mining standards bibliometrics data visualization norms infometrics natural language processing laws scientometrics statistical processing packages organizational hierarchies Enunciation courses natural language modeling data mining books bibliometrics data visualization articles infometrics natural language processing science fields scientometrics statistical processing packages public policies Forces social networks Structural social network analysis social network analysis package Dynamic social network anaysis System dynamics Subjectivity people multivariate statistics and analysis statistical processing packages groups, communities qualitative research spreadsheets
  • 12. Applications Visibility Enunciation Forces Subjectivity Human practices Human dynamics This is a way to study human dynamics considering the existence of subtle forms of control and influence from the existence of dispositifs
  • 13. First Application: enunciation how organizations describe theirselves speech of 81 organizations on sustainability proximity of organizations through speech
  • 14. First Application: how the same organizations are related with each other social relations of partnership between the organizations
  • 15. Next steps ● find ways to investigate the connection between the social network and the position of organizations through speech; ● find ways of investigating the subjective positions of the organizations for their positions in the discursive network and social network.
  • 16. References ● MITCHELL, Melanie. Complexity: a guided tour. Oxford Press. 2009. 349p. ● DELEUZE, Gilles. What is a dispositif. In: Michel Foucault: philosopher. Ed.: ARMSTROMG, Timothy J. Routledge. pp. 159- 168. 1990. ● FLYNN, Thomas. Foucault`s Mapping of History. In: The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Ed. GUTTING, Gary. Cambridge. 2003. 465p.

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