Tools And Metrics For Analyzing Showsite Behavior Iaee E Merge 2008

666
-1

Published on

Slidedeck used for an education session during the IAEE Expo! Expo! event in Miami

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
666
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Tools And Metrics For Analyzing Showsite Behavior Iaee E Merge 2008

    1. 1. Exhibitors and Attendees in Their Natural Habitat: Tools and Metrics for Analyzing Showsite Behavior to Improve Your Show Roger Lewis - Panelist
    2. 2. Introduction to Tradeshow Booth Analysis <ul><li>2/3 of CMO’s state events are vital </li></ul><ul><li>Key Challenge: “ Difficult to quantify and measure ” </li></ul><ul><li>Leads are key tradeshow metrics </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of Metrics in a troubled economy </li></ul><ul><li>Tradeshow Analytics </li></ul><ul><li>Improving ROI </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why should you analyze showsite attendee behavior? <ul><li>Number 1 indicator of buying intent </li></ul><ul><li>Uncover qualified leads </li></ul><ul><li>Measure interest level by product area </li></ul><ul><li>Increase both ROI and Revenue </li></ul>Benefits
    4. 4. Tools to understand attendee behavior in a booth? <ul><li>Human Observation </li></ul><ul><li>Video Capture </li></ul><ul><li>RFID </li></ul>
    5. 5. Introduction to RFID <ul><li>What is RFID? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RFID = Radio Frequency Identification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology has been in use since WWII and is used in Toll Tags </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do we implement? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An RFID tag on the badge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readers & Antennas are setup at designated areas around the booth </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Types <ul><li>Spectrum </li></ul><ul><ul><li>902 ... 928 MHz Long Range (10-500 ft) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>13.6 MHz Close proximity (6 inches) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Active vs. Passive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Passive – Accurate / inexpensive / shorter range (up to 50 ft) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Active – Accurate / expensive / long range (up to 500ft) </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Benefits
    8. 8. Exhibitors & Attendees in their Natural Habitat
    9. 9. Capture visits & duration to understand attendee interests
    10. 10. Measure interest level by product area
    11. 11. Where is the executive with budget looking for a solution? <ul><li>Know your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing Revenue Potential </li></ul>
    12. 12. Targeted Messaging <ul><li>Know your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing Revenue Potential </li></ul>
    13. 13. Increasing Revenue with Revenue Predictability Score Lead Prioritization scoring which is calculated based upon attendee role, preferences, behavior, and lead qualification
    14. 14. i-Quadrant
    15. 15. Recap <ul><li>#1 indicator of purchase intent is behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Technologies such as RFID are being readily adopted because of their ROI </li></ul><ul><li>It is all about Metrics, ROI, and increasing Revenue </li></ul>
    16. 16. Why measure? <ul><ul><li>Produce high-impact and highly successful events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop events that deliver measurable strategic business results </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Satisfy the real needs and expectations of participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand data on attitudes, behaviors, interests, preferences and applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide quantifiable value of events to key stakeholders: accountability </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Which metrics should I capture? <ul><ul><li>Attendance figures, broken out by function (buyer, exhibitor, speaker, staff, guest, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic contact information for each participant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing effectiveness: source codes and special links in e-mails that capture attendee responses to vehicle during the registration process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Traffic flow and crowd positioning on the show floor relative to specific booths and presentation areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preferences and interests, via survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Application of knowledge obtained at the event and impact of that knowledge on business, via ROI study </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Definition of ROI </li></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Why ROI? <ul><li>Information for analysis provided directly from experts – the participants </li></ul><ul><li>Uses most conservative methods for data collection </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies event impact on business </li></ul><ul><li>Accounts for intangible benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Data adjusted for confidence factor </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporates fully loaded costs </li></ul>
    19. 19. Harness the power of complexity by taming it taming complexity TM A little background…
    20. 20. Who is MAYA?
    21. 21. MAYA Design: Who <ul><li>taming complexity TM </li></ul>Human Sciences (Peter Lucas) How people think and form mental models • Cognitive Psychology • Anthropology • HCI (Human Computer Interaction) Design (Joe Ballay) Form and Function - makers Brainstorming/Creativity • Industrial/Graphic Designers • Film Makers • Animators • Architects Engineering (Jim Morris) Technologists • Computer Scientists • Electrical Engineers • Mechanical Engineers • Mathematicians
    22. 22. Why was MAYA formed?
    23. 23. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 More taming complexity TM
    24. 24. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] More $$$ At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM
    25. 25. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare Trend 1: The cost of powerful, complex products and systems has dropped precipitously over the last hundred years. taming complexity TM
    26. 26. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM
    27. 27. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ Information is Rare At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM
    28. 28. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Amount of Structured Information Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ i Information is Rare At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare Trend 2: The amount of structured information in the world has exploded with the advent of Radio, TV, and most recently the Internet. taming complexity TM
    29. 29. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Amount of Structured Information Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ i Information is Rare At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM
    30. 30. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Amount of Structured Information Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ i [Human evolution takes place on a much longer scale] Information is Rare At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM Trend 3: The ability for Humans to cope with these increases is limited by our own speed to evolve new “capabilities.”
    31. 31. 1900… 1970 1980 1990 [Printing Press, Telephone System] Amount of Structured Information Powerful Systems are cheap and ubiquitous Cost of Power & Complexity More $$$ ¢ i [Human evolution takes place on a much longer scale] Information is Rare MAYA was formed to help close this gap and match information and complex systems to the way people think. At the turn of the last century powerful/complex systems were expensive and hence Rare taming complexity TM
    32. 32. “ Most Advanced Yet Acceptable” -Raymond Loewy
    33. 33. MAYA | Human-Centered Design Design FORMING CONCEPTING • Sketching • Ideation • Concept Mapping . . . • Representation • Renderings • Models + Prototypes . . . Human-Centered Design OBSERVING EVALUATING • Interviewing • Field Studies • Contextual Inquiry . . . • Questionnaires • Usability Testing • Heuristics . . . Participatory Human-Centered Design We apply design thinking to business challenges…
    34. 34. taming complexity TM
    35. 35. What do customers experience (and expect)? taming complexity TM
    36. 36. Documenting “breakpoints” taming complexity TM
    37. 37. The Invisible Experience
    38. 38. Attendee-focused
    39. 39. Title
    40. 40. Title
    41. 41. Title
    42. 43. Attendee-Focused… WAYFINDING ACTIVITYFINDING INFORMATION ACCESS AND PACKAGING SOCIAL NETWORKING
    43. 44. Exhibitor-focused
    44. 45. Voice of the customer . . . Wary Pressured Disrespected Frustrated Anxious Victimized
    45. 46. First-time exhibitor
    46. 47. Typical forms
    47. 48. Title Often key information is managed like this…
    48. 49. Let’s follow one Exhibitor…
    49. 50. Exhibitor-Focused… ANXIETY COST BUSYNESS CONFUSION
    50. 51. For details, check out the white papers.

    ×