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Thinking about food and       embodiment  Deborah Lupton, Department ofSociology and Social Policy, University            ...
Bodies as social constructions• The lived experience of the body in everyday  life• How bodies are governed, regulated and...
• How other people’s bodies interact with our  bodies: interembodiment/intercorporeality• Bodies as conceptually fluid and...
•   Theorising fatness•   Fatness and morality•   The grotesque body•   The abject body•   The fluid, permeable body•   Fo...
Theorising fatnessFoucault:•   the body•   the medical gaze•   the care of the self•   governmentality•   biopower and bio...
Feminist philosophers: fluidities, leaky bodies• Elizabeth Grosz• Julia Kristeva• Margit Shildrick
Queer theory• The cultural construction of  embodiment/identity• Embodiment and identity as unstable• Gender and sexual id...
Health, diet and morality• Religious and spiritual beliefs• Health as an indicator of goodness• Body size as an indicator ...
The grotesque body•   Transgression•   Excess•   Lack of self-discipline and self-control•   Ugliness
The abject body•   Fluid, permeable•   Not tightly contained or controlled•   Monstrous•   Object of loathing and disgust
The food/health/beauty triplex• Health, diet and attractiveness all linked to  body size• Healthy = thin = beautiful
‘Queering’ Health at Every Size• HAES positions concepts of the body as  natural and instinctive• By changing our view of ...
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
Thinking about Food and Embodiment
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Thinking about Food and Embodiment

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Keynote address given at the Second International Critical Diatetics Conference, 2 September 2012, University of Sydney by Deborah Lupton.

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Transcript of "Thinking about Food and Embodiment"

  1. 1. Thinking about food and embodiment Deborah Lupton, Department ofSociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney
  2. 2. Bodies as social constructions• The lived experience of the body in everyday life• How bodies are governed, regulated and controlled• How bodies are culturally portrayed
  3. 3. • How other people’s bodies interact with our bodies: interembodiment/intercorporeality• Bodies as conceptually fluid and permeable: how body boundaries (literal and symbolic) are regulated• Bodies as assemblages
  4. 4. • Theorising fatness• Fatness and morality• The grotesque body• The abject body• The fluid, permeable body• Food/health/beauty triplex• HAES
  5. 5. Theorising fatnessFoucault:• the body• the medical gaze• the care of the self• governmentality• biopower and biopolitics
  6. 6. Feminist philosophers: fluidities, leaky bodies• Elizabeth Grosz• Julia Kristeva• Margit Shildrick
  7. 7. Queer theory• The cultural construction of embodiment/identity• Embodiment and identity as unstable• Gender and sexual identity as performed (Judith Butler)• The challenging of normativity
  8. 8. Health, diet and morality• Religious and spiritual beliefs• Health as an indicator of goodness• Body size as an indicator of self-control and self-discipline• Ill-health and fat embodiment as indicators of excessive consumption, lack of self-discipline
  9. 9. The grotesque body• Transgression• Excess• Lack of self-discipline and self-control• Ugliness
  10. 10. The abject body• Fluid, permeable• Not tightly contained or controlled• Monstrous• Object of loathing and disgust
  11. 11. The food/health/beauty triplex• Health, diet and attractiveness all linked to body size• Healthy = thin = beautiful
  12. 12. ‘Queering’ Health at Every Size• HAES positions concepts of the body as natural and instinctive• By changing our view of our selves, we change others’ views• But can ‘nature’ and the ‘instinctive’ be separated from society and culture?
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