Digital natives or digital victims: children and the online world

1,256 views

Published on

Keynote address presented at the Connect! Childhood, Wellbeing and Risk event, University of Bath, UK, 22 April 2014.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,256
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
35
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Digital natives or digital victims: children and the online world

  1. 1. Digital natives or digital victims? Children and the online world Deborah Lupton, News & Media Research Centre, University of Canberra
  2. 2.  ‘Arguably, no one is monitored more closely in our society than children and young people.’ Surveillance Technologies and Children report, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, October 2012
  3. 3. Bringing interests together digitised children parenting cultures sociology of pregnancy surveillance studies digital sociology
  4. 4. Ways to digitise children  Pregnancy/childbirth/parenting websites  Social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube  ‘Mummy blogs’  Ultrasounds: 2D and 3/4D  Digital photography/archives  Baby monitors  Nanny cams, webcams in daycare centres & schools  Wearable devices & toys with GPS and bodymetrics trackers  RFIDS  CCTV cameras & fingerprint scanners  Predictive analytics/big data on school performance  Trace data from children’s online use  Software for tracking children’s online use by parents
  5. 5. It begins with the positive pregnancy test …
  6. 6. Continues with the ultrasounds …
  7. 7. and pregnancy tracking devices …
  8. 8. Then childbirth …
  9. 9. Tracking infant development
  10. 10. and biometrics …
  11. 11. and all the milestones.
  12. 12. Keeping tabs in children’s health …
  13. 13. their location …
  14. 14. and trying to ensure their safety
  15. 15. Into the school years  RFIDs  CCTV cameras (85% of UK schools)  digitised fingerprint scanners  digital tracking of school meals  school tracking of children’s internet use  predictive analytics  educational data-mining  parental monitoring of SMS messages
  16. 16. Digital educational tools valorised
  17. 17. Meanwhile, concern is growing  Childhood obesity  Cyberbullying/trolling  Paedophiles/stalkers  Mental health concerns  Social skills  Loss of face-to-face contact  Self-esteem  Over-sharing
  18. 18. Discourses of contemporary parenting  Intensive parenting  Parents as responsible for children’s wellbeing and health  The desire to manage risk/control fate
  19. 19. Discourses of childhood  The precious child  The vulnerable child  The uncivilized child  The pure child
  20. 20. Discourses of digital technologies  Big data as key to information  Tracking devices as accurate and producing valuable data  Children as digital natives  Digital tech as saviour and threat
  21. 21. Things to think about  Children’s privacy, dignity and consent  The over-monitored child  Children’s capacity to develop digital literacy  Surveillance as a form of control  How big data will be used  How predictive analytics will shape futures  The permanence of digital data archives

×