Storymapping The User Experience

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What does a great experience have in common with a great story? Everything. While creating an experience that engages, influences, and excites can sometimes seem daunting, crafting a great story is actually quite quick and easy.

See how simple storytelling techniques can transform your next product, feature, UI, flow, or strategy from good to great. Whether you are creating a product, service, or feature from scratch or improving one for conversion, activation, or engagement, strategic storytelling will help you figure out what you need to do, when, and how you need to do it, so that you get the results you need.

About Donna Lichaw
Donna is the author of The User’s Journey: Storymapping Products That People Love. Through her writing, speaking, and much loved Storymapping Workshop, Donna guides startups, non-profits, and global brands in optimizing their digital products and services by providing them with a simplified way to drive user engagement. Utilizing her ‘story first’ approach, she helps organizations define and refine their value proposition, transform their thinking, and better engage with their core customers.

Recognized as a thought leader in storytelling and customer engagement strategies, she has presented as a keynote speaker at design and technology conferences in the US, Canada and Europe. She has also taught courses at New York University, Northwestern University, The School of Visual Arts, and Parsons the New School for Design. Prior to her career in technology, she refined her talent for storytelling and narrative development as an award-winning documentary filmmaker. You can find her on the web at www.donnalichaw.com.

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Storymapping The User Experience

  1. 1. STORYMAPPING THE USER EXPERIENCE DONNA LICHAW DONNALICHAW.COM 
 @DLICHAW
  2. 2. TODAY’S AGENDA Why story? How stories work Developing your stories Applying stories Rules of thumb
  3. 3. INTRODUCTIONS Who you are What you do Why you are here today
  4. 4. THE WAY THINGS WERE
  5. 5. Designing for the Digital Age: Creating Human-Centered Products and Services Table 16.8. Sketching from a scenario. Scenario step Sketch Comments 1. Laura takes a call from Mr. Cowell, who needs to make an appointment for his cat to have a tumor removed. Laura finds him in the client list and opens his record to see detail in the client over- view display area, which shows that Mr. Cowell has three cats, one of whom is flagged for follow-up. cowell,bob cowell,tom find cowell client list workspace fluffy xenaclient 2 1 3 This first sketch draws upon the organizer/workspace pattern and the data model, which indicates that pets are parts of the client record. The “find” field is understood as a placeholder for some way or ways to locate clients.
  6. 6. Hinman, Rachel. 2012. The Mobile Frontier. New York: Rosenfeld Media. www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/mobile-design/
  7. 7. FLAT FLOWS High bounce rates Low conversion Low activation Low engagement High funnel drop-off
  8. 8. STORYTELLING
  9. 9. STORYTELLING there’s A Formula For That
  10. 10. STORYTELLINGMAPPING
  11. 11. http://www.denofgeek.com/tv/breaking-bad/27141/see-inside-the-breaking-bad-writers-room
  12. 12. http://www.sundance.tv/series/the-writers-room/photos/the-writers-room-breaking-bad#/9
  13. 13. Not to be confused with…
  14. 14. http://www.agileproductdesign.com/blog/the_new_backlog.html
  15. 15. It’s more like…
  16. 16. MAKE THINGS GO BOOM
  17. 17. HOW STORY WORKS
  18. 18. Beginning Middle End
  19. 19. Hero Goal Exposition
  20. 20. Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition
  21. 21. Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition
  22. 22. Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis
  23. 23. Climax or Resolution Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis
  24. 24. Falling Action Climax or Resolution Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis Denouement
  25. 25. End Climax or Resolution Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis Falling Action Denouement
  26. 26. End Falling Action Climax or Resolution Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis Denouement
  27. 27. EXERCISE End Falling Action Climax or Resolution Rising Action Inciting Incident or Problem Hero Goal Exposition Crisis Denouement
  28. 28. 3STORIES
  29. 29. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES USAGE STORIES
  30. 30. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES USAGE STORIES
  31. 31. Goal Met Who 
 Goal Value & Competitive advantage Problem Product Name Market Category Takeaway Competition
  32. 32. CONCEPT STORIES Who a product is for Why someone would use it What a product is How it’s better than the competition ORIGIN STORIES
  33. 33. EXERCISE Goal Met Who / Goal Value & Competitive advantage Problem Product Name Market Category Takeaway Competition } Concept Story
  34. 34. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES USAGE STORIES
  35. 35. Collect & Share Collect images
 Share images Visual collecting & sharing! It’s a pain Discover Pinterest Sign up Homepage Landing page App store Email Ad Eh
  36. 36. Goal met Who 
 Goal Why they should care
 problem solved Problem
 Trigger
 Painpoint Discover product Action Word of mouth Paid advertising Google search App store Other channels/touchpoints Acquisition Activation Conversion Awareness Measureable Homepage Landing page App store Email Ad } Resistance
  37. 37. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES Who a product is for Why someone would want to use it How they will discover the product What value/affordances someone should see What action(s) they should take
  38. 38. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES Who a product is for Why someone would want to use it How they will discover the product What value/affordances someone should see What action(s) they should take } Target market Problem space Acquisition funnels, Mktg, SEO Requirements, Copy, Assets CTA(s)
  39. 39. EXERCISE } Origin Story Goal met Who 
 Goal Why they should care
 problem solved Problem
 Trigger
 Painpoint Discover product Action Word of mouth Paid advertising Google search App store Other channels/touchpoints Homepage Landing page App store Email Ad Resistance
  40. 40. Sign up Collect and share something
  41. 41. Sign up Collect and share something
  42. 42. CONCEPT STORIES ORIGIN STORIES USAGE STORIES
  43. 43. Goal Met Who 
 Goal Solve Problem
 Experience Value Problem
 Incentive
 CTA Flow Finish
 Flow Impediment Sign up Payment Funnel drop-off (metrics) Mental hurdles Boredom Lack of value Usability
  44. 44. Inciting Incident
  45. 45. Rising Action
  46. 46. Rising Action
  47. 47. Rising Action
  48. 48. Crisis
  49. 49. Climax
  50. 50. Falling Action
  51. 51. End
  52. 52. Home 
 In the KnowWant To Be In the Know Access + Membership
 Friends Are Here? Sign up Onboarding Flow Finish
 Flow Boredom Lack of value
  53. 53. Inciting Incident
  54. 54. Rising Action
  55. 55. Rising Action
  56. 56. Rising Action
  57. 57. Crisis
  58. 58. Climax Falling Action
  59. 59. End
  60. 60. MICRO-STORIES AND HABIT LOOPS
  61. 61. Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 ∞ Days Months Years LONG-TERM ENGAGEMENT
  62. 62. Goal Met Who 
 Goal Solve Problem
 Experience Value Problem
 Incentive
 CTA Flow Finish
 Flow Impediment Sign up Payment Funnel drop-off (metrics) Mental hurdles Boredom Lack of value Usability
  63. 63. EXERCISE } Usage Story Goal MetWho 
 Goal Solve Problem
 Experience Value Problem
 Incentive
 CTA Flow Finish
 Flow Impediment Sign up Payment Funnel drop-off (metrics) Mental hurdles Boredom Lack of value Usability
  64. 64. CASE STUDIES
  65. 65. DAFFODILS
  66. 66. Ben, The Dutiful Citizen
 NARRATIVE ARC
 
 CPC donors tend to fit this profile.
 
 Action&Excitement Timeline Gives: “I use the park and should contribute.” Lives or works near the park.
 Loves spending time outdoors. Asked to donate • Broadcast media • Social media • Mail (paper, email) Deterrents: • Trust • Intangible ROI • Digital usability • Geographical relevance Sees: “I can see where my money is going when I’m at the park. I don’t get that with cancer research. I can’t see cells in a microscope.” Feels ownership and sees utility in Central Park Goals met: • To be a part of something bigger • To contribute to society by doing their duty
  67. 67. Ben, The Dutiful Citizen
 CONTENT & FUNCTIONALITY
 
 This content & functionality will help Ben stay informed and remind him to donate. 
 Action&Excitement Timeline Reminders • Signage about donations in strategic locations throughout park • Acquisition of e-mail address at time of previous gift, “Remind me to give in the future?” • Social reminders, e.g. Twitter, Facebook tied to park improvements • Simplified mobile sign-up for gift reminders (outside of a gift interaction) Making a Donation • Detailed needs and associated costs in giving menu • Focus on what gifts are supporting now in the blog, including recent projects and the Year in Review (beyond the annual report) • Information about the number and impact of smaller gifts (daffodils) • Information about where your money goes and where project support comes from After the Donation • E-mail campaign tied to specific deadlines • Tangible outcomes, such as a tote, water bottle, or lunch box • Deadlines with “blunt language” for donation categories, which explain why the deadline exists
  68. 68. COMMUNITY ACCESS GIVING
  69. 69. The Seton Hill University Student Story Goals met: • Educated • Job-ready • Community New student goals: • To learn • To be job-ready • To be a part of a community Timeline Action/Excitement/Awesomeness Admissions Graduation Thinks that attending SHU is the best way to meet her or his goal Attends SHU Finds and feels: Strong sense of community Access to faculty/staff Spirit and ethos of giving Extremely happy with SHU Feels like a part of SHU THE STUDENT STORY
  70. 70. The Seton Hill University Engaged Alumna/us Story Goals met Networked Community Alumna goals: • To get a job or extend professional network • To stay connected to her community Timeline Action/Excitement/Awesomeness Graduation ∞ Is asked to volunteer on the board Participates on the board Finds and feels: • Strong sense of community • Access to faculty/staff • Spirit and ethos of giving Extremely happy with SHU Feels like a part of SHU Struggles: • Registering for events online • Finding out news about campus • Accessing faculty/staff • Finding other alumni • Knowing about job opportunities • FB is easier way to meet goals THE ENGAGED ALUMNI STORY
  71. 71. Alumna Goals: • To get a job or extend professional network • To stay connected to her community ∞ The Seton Hill University Differently-Engaged Alumna/us Story Goals met Networked Community Seeks community of alumni through informal channels: • In-person meetups, meals, coffee • Facebook newsfeed, alumni groups Timeline Action/Excitement/Awesomeness Graduation Misses SHU community THE DISENGAGED DIGITAL ALUMNI STORY
  72. 72. ∞ Alumna Goals: • To get a job or extend professional network • To stay connected to her community Visits website and participates in digital services Finds and feels: • Strong sense of community • Access to faculty/staff • Spirit and ethos of giving Extremely happy with SHU Feels like a part of SHU The Seton Hill University Future-State Engaged Alumna/us Story Goals met Networked Community Timeline Action/Excitement/Awesomenessry Graduation Misses SHU community Becomes aware of alumni website GAPS & OPPORTUNITIES
  73. 73. SPREADSHEETS
  74. 74. FINDING YOUR STORY
  75. 75. LOOK
  76. 76. LOOK
  77. 77. AGENDA ‣ INSERT CHAPTER TITLES 94
  78. 78. LISTEN
  79. 79. USING YOUR STORY
  80. 80. COMMUNICATE
  81. 81. WRITE
  82. 82. ILLUSTRATED Cheng, Kevin. 2012. See What I Mean. New York: Rosenfeld Media. rosenfeldmedia.com/books/comics/ VISUALIZE
  83. 83. VISUALIZE
  84. 84. VISUALIZE
  85. 85. ACT IT OUT
  86. 86. Gap analysis SWOT analysis Requirements gathering Needs assessment SUPPORT
  87. 87. STRATEGIZE
  88. 88. STRATEGIZE
  89. 89. RULES OF THUMB Stories are character-driven Characters are goal-driven Conflict is key Goals are measurable Goals can change
  90. 90. WHAT IS THE STORY?
  91. 91. DONNALICHAW.COM | @DLICHAW THE USER’S JOURNEY

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