Using Map Data To Build A Data Driven
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Using Map Data To Build A Data Driven

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  • Materials : Tables 4, 10 and 16 from School Growth Study - Workbook pp. 19-20 Facilitator Note: A copy of the full report is available to participants. However, they must request it from NWEA by emailing training@nwea.org. Key Idea: The two tables are part of the NWEA Research Report: Study of growth index performance by school. They show us school growth for the areas of reading and mathematics from fall to spring. Talking Points: The highlighted bars on each table show us the percentage of students meeting or exceeding their growth targets in schools performing at: 10th percentile growth Examining the 10th percentile line will help us to know what schools producing the lowest growth among our clients nationally see in terms of percentage of students meeting their targets. 50th percentile growth Examining the 50th percentile line will help us to know what schools producing average growth among our clients nationally see in terms of percentage of students meeting their targets. 90th percentile growth Examining the 90th percentile line will help us to know what schools producing the highest growth among our clients nationally see in terms of percentage of students meeting their targets. Activity: Purpose – to engage participants in thinking about how this information might inform appropriate growth evaluation and goal setting At your tables discuss each of the questions below: Mr. Jones is having conferences with teachers in his school about student growth. What would the conversation sound like with a 3rd grade teacher who has 60% of her students meeting or exceeding their growth targets in mathematics? Would it be appropriate for a 7th grade team in a school to celebrate the fact that 65% of their students met or exceeded their reading targets? Why or why not? Talking Points for whole group debrief: Her students are growing at a rate that is commensurate with 70 percentile growth. These folks are performing at the 95th percentile for growth, and they teach 7th graders! Give them a party!

Using Map Data To Build A Data Driven Using Map Data To Build A Data Driven Presentation Transcript

  • Minnesota NWEA Member’s Conference Nov. 10, 2009 Dan Henderson, NWEA Partner Relations Rep.
    • Creating the Vision
    • Administrative Leadership
    • Goal Setting & Celebrating Growth
    • Differentiated Instruction
    • Professional Development
    • QnA
    • One District’s Story
      • Real District In Iowa
      • Been Using MAP since 2004
      • Administrator attended a “Growth & Goals” workshop last summer
      • Has strong district support
  • An Iowa School District School Grade Test 2006-2007 percent of students meeting growth target 2006-2007 National Percentile Rank 2007-2008 percent of students meeting growth target 2007-2008 National Percentile Rank A Elem 3 math 55.6% 55%ile 69.2% 85%ile A Elem 3 reading 61.1% 67%ile 80.8% 96%ile B Elem 3 math 41.6% 12%ile 61% 65%ile B Elem 3 reading 55.1% 52%ile 69% 85%ile
  • An Iowa School District School Grade Test 2006-2007 percent of students meeting growth target 2006-2007 National Percentile Rank 2007-2008 percent of students meeting growth target 2007-2008 National Percentile Rank A Elem 4 math 32.1% 9%ile 83.3% 97%ile A Elem 4 reading 60.7% 70%ile 66.7% 85%ile B Elem 4 math 37.3% 17%ile 78.9% 95%ile B Elem 4 reading 59% 68%ile 72% 93%ile
  • An Iowa School District School Grade Test 2006-2007 percent of students meeting growth target 2006-2007 National Percentile Rank 2007-2008 percent of students meeting growth target 2007-2008 National Percentile Rank A Elem 5 math 58.3% 67%ile 83.3% 97%ile A Elem 5 reading 70.8% 91%ile 61.5% 72%ile B Elem 5 math 38.2% 18%ile 71.4% 87%ile B Elem 5 reading 37.3% 9%ile 67.5% 85%ile
  • An Iowa School District School Grade Test 2006-2007 percent of students meeting growth target 2006-2007 National Percentile Rank 2007-2008 percent of students meeting growth target 2007-2008 National Percentile Rank MS 6 math 41.6% 22%ile 68.4% 80%ile MS 6 reading 54.5% 55%ile 81.8% 99%ile MS 7 math 68.8% 90%ile 63.1% 79%ile MS 7 reading 45% 27%ile 65.3% 92%ile MS 8 math 50.6% 42%ile 59.3% 69%ile MS 8 reading 44.4% 28%ile 59.4% 74%ile
  • Fall Spring Subject Grade Mean Growth Mean Growth Target Growth Index Percent Meeting Growth Target 2004 2005 Reading 6 3.5 3.9 -0.4 50 2004 2005 Reading 7 3 3.3 -0.3 51.2 2004 2005 Reading 8 3.1 3 0.1 56.9 2005 2006 Reading 6 5 4 1 57.9 2005 2006 Reading 7 2.2 3.2 -1 44.4 2005 2006 Reading 8 0.5 3.1 -2.6 41.3 2006 2007 Reading 6 4.6 4.1 0.5 54.5 2006 2007 Reading 7 1.3 3.3 -2 45.3 2006 2007 Reading 8 3.2 3.2 0 55.9 2007 2008 Reading 6 9.6 4.3 5.2 81.8 2007 2008 Reading 7 5.9 3.3 2.6 65.3 2007 2008 Reading 8 4.2 3.1 1 57.4
  • Fall Spring Subject Grade Mean Growth Mean Growth Target Growth Index Percent Meeting Growth Target 2004 2005 Math 6 4.9 7 -2.1 42.3 2004 2005 Math 7 6.3 6 -0.3 56 2004 2005 Math 8 6 5.2 0.8 60.7 2005 2006 Math 6 4.4 7 -2.6 35.6 2005 2006 Math 7 5.9 5.9 0 57.1 2005 2006 Math 8 3.6 5.2 -1.7 45.2 2006 2007 Math 6 4.7 7 -2.3 41.6 2006 2007 Math 7 7.9 6 1.9 68.8 2006 2007 Math 8 3.8 5.2 -1.4 44.4 2007 2008 Math 6 9.5 7 2.5 68.4 2007 2008 Math 7 6.3 5.8 0.5 63.1 2007 2008 Math 8 5.7 5.1 0.6 59.4
  • What Actions Did This School Take?
      • Every student, teacher, grade level, building and district has a growth goal
      • Teachers are having regular data conversations & collaborate (PLC)
      • Teachers are focusing instruction on areas of need identified by data
      • Reflect on & celebrate growth every year
  • What Actions Did the Principal Take?
    • Developed a monthly MAP data analysis planner – stuck to it religiously
    • Established data protocols – made data analysis routine and expected
    • Personally met with teachers and students for goal setting (took 2 days)
    • Required teachers to use data during weekly PLC time
  • I. Administrative Leadership – Creating the Culture
    • Assessments used once per year are only for summative analysis (not for instruction)
    • FREQUENCY OF ASSESSMENT:
      • Once per year = “autopsy assessment”
      • Twice per year = “before and after” picture
      • Three per year = “half-time” adjustment
      • BUT WHAT ABOUT TEACHING TIME?
  • A “Fishing” Parable
  •  
  • Administrative Leadership – Creating the Culture
    • Changing the Paradigm on Assessment
    • Are Instruction & Assessment separate events? (Assessment of Learning)
    • Assessment & Instruction are inseparable! (Assessment FOR learning)
    • Assessment IS Learning……if:
      • Results are frequent
      • Immediate
      • Tied to important learning outcomes
      • Provides feedback that can be used to change learning
  • Administrative Leadership – Creating the Culture
    • Providing collaborative time regularly for staff to use and analyze data:
      • Identify important decisions that will be made with data.
      • Have a “data dialog” at every teacher’s meeting
      • Have data analysis as part of every in-service
      • Celebrate data successes publicly and frequently
      • Create data analysis routines or protocols annually
  • Managing Data Analysis – Using A Monthly Planner
  • II. Goal Setting Using Growth Data
    • WHY focus on growth data?
    • Main reason: to move the whole system forward, not just some students.
    • Cannot consider trends with status data only.
  • A B Proficient Cut Point Which student had a “better” school year? Fall Spring Fall Spring
  • Growth Makes All The Difference
  • Setting Growth Goals Systemically
    • Every Student
    • Every Class/Teacher
    • Every Grade/Subject Team
    • Every Building
    • Whole District
  • Student Growth Goal Setting
    • Use “Student Goal Setting Worksheet”
    • Identify a RIT Target Score from fall to spring
    • Meet with students to review their goal and progress several times a year
    • Teachers review the goal worksheet with parents – get parent involvement
    • Principal reinforces goals with short student interviews
  •  
  • Every Class/Teacher Has Growth Goals
    • Use Achievement Status & Growth Report
    • Teachers should identify historical performance in “percent of students meeting or exceeding target growth”
    • Use Growth Percentiles Charts
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Every Grade/Subject Team Needs Growth Goals
    • Identify strengths and weaknesses in growth trends
    • Use Student Growth Summary Report
    • Identify:
      • % of students meeting/exceeding growth targets
      • Growth Index
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 211.3 217.2 5.9 8 -2.1 209.3 215.6 213.1 218.3 210.7 218.9 6.3 5.2 8.2 211.5 214.9 212.7 216.8 210.5 216.3 211.3 217.7 3.4 4.1 5.8 6.4 Number Sense Computation Algebra Geometry Measurement Data Analysis, Stats. Problem Solving
  • Building Level Growth Goals
    • Principal login to Dynamic Reporting Suite
    • Use: Four Quadrant Building Report
    • Have a Building Level Goal and/or grade level goals
    • Identify the Four Quadrant percent for the building. Set a goal based on prior year data.
  • Low growth Not Proficient High growth Not Proficient High growth Proficient Low Growth Proficient State Proficiency Growth Targets
  •  
  • District Level Growth Goal
    • Supt./Curriculum Directors/Associate Supt. develop growth goals for the district.
    • Use Dynamic Reporting Suite : “District by School”
    • Identify the Four Quadrant percent for the district. Set a goal based on prior year data.
    • “ Move the Whole System Forward” (MWSF)
  •  
  • III. Using MAP To Inform Instruction
    • Teacher role: requires systematic professional development
    • Principal role: how can you assure teachers have the skills, resources and time necessary to use data for differentiated instruction?
    • Two Ideas:
      • Set a class focus area each fall using goal strand information
      • Collaborate with other teachers to provide differentiated instruction
  • IV. Professional Development
    • Use data to identify areas of need in instructional practice – focus area for professional development as a staff or individual teachers
    • NWEA Workshop Continuum: provide teachers with necessary training:
      • Stepping Stones to using Data
      • Climbing the Data Ladder
      • Growth & Goals
    • Professional Development experts advocate for at least 20-40 hours of professional development PER NEW STRATEGY OR PROGRAM
        • Showers, 2001
    How Much Time Is Enough?
  • Percent of Participants Attaining Transfer Theory/Information Only 0% Demonstration 0% Practice 5% Peer Coaching 95% Showers, 2001
        • Design provides for:
          • Theory
          • Demonstration
          • Practice
          • Collaboration & Peer Coaching
          • Adjusting training in response to data
          • Continuous Improvement
    Research-Based Process for Professional Development Workshop Format
  • Consider This: What is the probability that your achievement results will be any different next year if you do the same things that you’ve done this year?
  • Wrap-Up: What Will You Do Next?
    • Plan
    • Set goals
    • Provide the Time
    • Questions?