Digital Citizenship: Responsible Behavior in a Digital World

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  • Either one may not know how to use technology properly – we need to find common ground and become members of a digital citizenry.
  • Why is it so important for someone to be a contributing member of a digital society? The concept of Digital Citizenship reinforces the positive aspect of technology. It helps us understand how to behave so we can all work and play safely in a digital world.
  • How many of you have AUP’s at your school? Acceptable Use Policies aren’t enough Tell a student what they can and cannot do Do NOT tell them what is APPROPRIATE and why! The majority of schools today have adopted acceptable use policies. Do you have one in your school? What does it say? Most AUP tell students what they can and can not do, but not what’s APPROPRATE to do and why. The Nine Elements of DC help us bring clarity to our digital world. The Information Superhighway is part of our society now, we’d better got on the road and navigate safely or risk going for a bumpy (and sometimes unpleasant) ride
  • ESE – low income families can’t afford Physical Location – low income schools have no or too few computers Rural locations have no access to the internet Are there programs available in your area for access outside of school? Disabilities – special needs students require access
  • ESE – low income families can’t afford Physical Location – low income schools have no or too few computers Rural locations have no access to the internet Are there programs available in your area for access outside of school? Disabilities – special needs students require access
  • Teachers don’t’ think it’s their responsibility
  • Ask the group: Do you really think this is what’s happening outside these doors? Why? Flip chart or ask the group first. Ask yourself – ask your students: do we REALLY need to be in contact with other people ALL the time? These aren’t BAD things… it’s just how/when we use them!
  • This slide shows various ways of sharing information in this digital age. How can you use some of these tools in your classroom? Examples: Pop quizzes using text messaging Podcasting through an Ipod Discussion Board forums using Blogs Wikis to research information for group projects and or introductions Can use an online chat room for special meetings, topics, special people Video conferencing for engaging with other students in other states, countries. Pen Pals
  • This slide shows various ways of sharing information in this digital age. How can you use some of these tools in your classroom? Examples: Pop quizzes using text messaging Podcasting through an Ipod Discussion Board forums using Blogs Wikis to research information for group projects and or introductions Can use an online chat room for special meetings, topics, special people Video conferencing for engaging with other students in other states, countries. Pen Pals
  • What’s happening is that the focus is on learning the technology itself, with little time discussing what is or isn’t appropriate. We need to learn new ways of presenting information to students who are eager to be engaged.
  • What’s happening is that the focus is on learning the technology itself, with little time discussing what is or isn’t appropriate. We need to learn new ways of presenting information to students who are eager to be engaged.
  • Certain Tech skills are CRITICAL when entering the work world. Just “liking” technology isn’t enough! Important to know how it works and how to use it appropriately Set the tone by looking at the MLK, Jr. website
  • This would then lead to the discussion as to how one knows whether or not a digital source is reliable. Help students develop their critical thinking abilities to discriminate between real and bogus online information. Divide the class up into 4 groups, each group taking one website. Their job is to critique the website and to be prepared to share their comments with the class.
  • Certain Tech skills are CRITICAL when entering the work world. Just “liking” technology isn’t enough! Important to know how it works and how to use it appropriately Set the tone by looking at the MLK, Jr. website
  • Take a poll of the number of participants who have the following accounts: Facebook MySpace Twitter Shutterfly (or other photo sharing) Linkdin Others… as suggested by group When students see adults using technology inappropriately, they assume it’s ok. Seeks out others to see how they view the use of technology Makes adjustments It’s important that we model the appropriate behavior.
  • When students see adults using technology inappropriately, they assume it’s ok. Seeks out others to see how they view the use of technology Makes adjustments
  • Open the floor for discussion. How did you feel when you heard about this?
  • Hand out the ISTE Compass. Explain to the group that they can create scenarios for their class and hand out the compass for interaction.
  • Responsible digital behavior makes every user a role model
  • Responsible digital behavior makes every user a role model
  • Responsible digital behavior makes every user a role model
  • After the clip, give out the handout and have the group complete it.
  • When students see adults using technology inappropriately, they assume it’s ok. Seeks out others to see how they view the use of technology Makes adjustments
  • When someone becomes a member of a group, they must abide by the rules and regulations that are agreed upon. No different to becoming a digital citizen
  • When someone becomes a member of a group, they must abide by the rules and regulations that are agreed upon. No different to becoming a digital citizen
  • Safety concerns are more than being worried about the physical security of your technology equipment. We need to consider the physical well-being and security of technology USERS!
  • Safety concerns are more than being worried about the physical security of your technology equipment. We need to consider the physical well-being and security of technology USERS! After the clip have the group take the internet addiction test. What were their thoughts? Concerns?
  • While the following illustration identifies the recommended steps to building a digital citizenship program, the first priority of any digital citizenship program depends on what’s currently in place in the school district. If your school has basic knowledge issues, such as how to use the Internet, basic browsing and collaboration tools, then Student Learning and Academic Performance is where you should start. If Cyberbullying is an issue in your school, maybe you start at School Environment. It doesn’t matter where you begin to focus your attention. It just seems logical, much like Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs, that there must be some sense of fullfilment of the previous level before you can safely move up to the next leve.

Transcript

  • 1. Are YOU a Digital Citizen? Copyright for the cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On , readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org. An Introduction to the Nine Elements Florida TechNet Debra L Hargrove, Ed.D.,Director Kimberly Gates Fayne Johnson Joan Luebbe Jana Whitehead Most of the scenarios were adapted from http://www.slideshare.net/katisearcy as well as Digital Citizenship in Schools , by Mike Ribble and Gerald Bailey. Used with permission
  • 2. A Vision of Students Today http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o
  • 3. Quick Definitions (circa 1970’s) Backup What you need to do when you run into a tree Byte What those darn flies do Cache What you need to buy groceries Crash When you go to a party uninvited Hacker Uncle Buddy after 40 years of smoking Modem What you did when the grass and weeds got too tall
  • 4. Are you a Native or Immigrant?
    • Digital Native
      • a person who has grown up with digital technology such as computers, the Internet, mobile phones and MP3.
    • Digital Immigrant
      • an individual who grew up without digital technology and adopted it later.
    http://tinyurl.com/digitalimmigrant
  • 5. Formal and Informal Groups
    • We started interacting technologically with each other since the early 1990’s
    • Created our own digital society
      • Comes with assumptions that we all behave an accepted way
      • Not everyone does
    • We must prepare our students to live in a world without boundaries
    • Help them work with others virtually or otherwise!
    Follow the rules!
  • 6. Are there specific rules for behaving in a digital world?
    • Introduce the concept of Digital Citizenship (DC)
    • Explain the Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship
    • Provide resources for teaching and implementing a DC program in your school
  • 7. Why (Digital) Citizenship?
    • Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city or town but now usually a country) and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen .
    • Citizenship status often implies some responsibilities ...
    • cit·i·zen·ship   ˈsɪtəzənˌʃɪp, -sən- - Show Spelled Pronunciation [ sit - uh -z uh n-ship, -s uh n-] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
    • – noun
    • 1.the state of being vested with the rights, privileges, and duties of a citizen.
    • 2.the character of an individual viewed as a member of society; behavior in terms of the duties, obligations, and functions of a citizen: an award for good citizenship. [Origin: 1605–15; citizen + -ship]
    • Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen
  • 8. Adopting the DC Philosophy
    • A way to approach the challenges facing all technology users
    • A good starting point for both Natives and Immigrants
    • The first step in helping our students (and ourselves) become good digital citizens
    • Acceptable Use Policies Aren’t Enough!
  • 9. What would you do?
    • You’ve finally been able to escape to the beach for the weekend. You found the perfect spot… no children, no pets, no people.
    • All of a sudden, a person shows up and starts talking loudly on their cell phone.
    • Is it OK to talk on your cell phone in public?
    While the copyright for these cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On, readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org.
  • 10. Be thinking…
    • Do I see similar issues in my classroom or school?
    • If not, could they BE an issue in the next year or two?
  • 11. Getting in the Mindset Who will YOU be? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX0aycyAAJA
  • 12. Digital Access full electronic participation in society
    • Technology allows opportunities for large numbers of people to communicate quickly
    • Not everyone has access
    SES Physical Location Disabilities The haves and have nots Low income schools Rural schools Meeting ADA?
  • 13. Digital Access full electronic participation in society From “News & Trends” Technology & Learning , 28(10), p.16
  • 14. Digital Access Scenario
    • The students in your GED class have been given the task of watching a 20-minute Discovery Education streaming movie outside of regular class time.
    • They have one week in which they are to watch the online movie and take the online quiz.
  • 15. What the Teacher said…
    • The students have been told that they will receive a “zero” if they do not watch the movie and take the quiz at home, even though some students do not have Internet access, and some students who do have Internet access, have a dial-up connection.
  • 16.
    • The teacher gives the assignment that all students are to view the movie and take the quiz. For students who do not have the appropriate Internet connections at home, he/she offers the opportunity for them to
    • come to the classroom 30 minutes before school starts, or
    • come to the classroom after school, or
    • take home a CD with the movie and a printed quiz so they may complete the assignment .
    What SHOULD have happened?
  • 17. Let’s think about it! Other possible alternatives to watching the online video Library Ipod Smart Phone Friend’s What else?
  • 18. What could make a difference
    • When giving online assignments for students to complete outside of school, it is important to remember that they may not have access to the Internet.
    • For some this may be an ongoing situation and for others it may be a temporary non-access issue.
    • Since the Internet is a valuable resource, teachers need to provide alternative ways for the students to access the information in order to complete assignments.
  • 19. Digital Commerce Buying and selling of goods online
    • Most difficult element to address
    • Generation Y (8-24 yr olds) spent $196 Billion/year
    • Do they really know
      • All sides of the transaction process
      • Internet scams
      • Identity theft
      • Source: Shop.org 2006
  • 20. Digital Commerce Buying and selling of goods online
  • 21. What Makes a Website Safe?
    • Padlock
    • HTTPS
    • Physical Address and Contact Phone
    • Privacy and Return Policies
    • Being cautious when buying overseas
    • http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html
  • 22. Melissa
    • Melissa, who recently celebrated her 19 th birthday, received an $1000 check from her rich grandmother. She deposited the check in her bank account for which she has a debit card.
    • Melissa’s home internet connection is temporarily down, so she rode with her older sister to the local public library to use the computer there.
    • While on the eBay site, she saw that they have just what she wants – a brand new Wii for only $10.00!
  • 23. What happened…
    • Excitedly, Melissa took our her debit card and bid on the item. She had watched her father do this before and knows just what to do.
    • She wanted to make sure she is the highest bidder so she quickly entered her debit card information and selected $300 as her maximum bid.
    • She didn’t log off as she left the library computer.
  • 24. What Do You Think About That?
  • 25. What She SHOULD Have Done
    • Melissa realized that a new Wii could not possibly sell for $10.00. She looked at other Wii’s that were listed on eBay and saw that the winning bids have averaged around $275.
    • She really wants the Wii but is uncomfortable putting her debit card information online to purchase something for which she is unsure of the final price.
    • She logs off the library computer and goes home.
  • 26. What could make a difference
    • Melissa would do well to go to a store that sells retail Nintendo products such as the Wii. She will know the exact price of the new product she is purchasing plus she will have a receipt in order to return it if it does not work properly.
    • Her parents and teachers would do well to advise her to be careful where she uses her debit card as that card is the “key” to her checking account funds.
  • 27. An Online Auction
  • 28. Don’t Forget What Makes a Website Safe
    • Padlock
    • HTTPS
    • Physical Address and Contact Phone
    • Privacy and Return Policies
    • Being cautious when buying overseas
    • http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html
  • 29. Digital Communication the electronic exchange of information Texting Handout
  • 30. Digital Communication the electronic exchange of information
    • How many ways can we share information?
      • Cell phones
      • Text messaging (IM’ing)
      • Video conferencing
      • Email video
      • Chat rooms
      • Fax
      • Blog
      • Wiki
      • -Social Networks
    How can you use some of the tools listed in your classroom? What positive outcomes do they enable?
  • 31. Digital Communication the electronic exchange of information
    • The Couch Potato Generation (8-18)
      • Watch TV – 270 min
      • Text messaging – 90 min
      • Video games – 73 min
      • Nonschool computer use – 89 min
      • Listen to music – 151 min
      • Talk on cell phone – 33 min
      • Using phones, computers, TVs and video game systems 7.5 hrs/day!
      • Source: Kaiser Family Foundation (Time article February 1, 2010)
  • 32. Scenario
    • Adult learners at a local school were terrified earlier in the school year when they learned there was an armed intruder on their campus.
    • Since that incident, almost all of the students at the school now bring cell phones to school in order to be able to contact family in case of any future emergency.
  • 33. What Happened…
    • The students set their “interesting” ring tones on loud rather than setting the phone to vibrate or turning it off. Whenever possible, they took the phones out and used them to text messages to their classmates in and out of class.
    • One student also took unflattering photos of their Adult Ed teacher behind her back and sent them to classmates as well.
  • 34.
    • The Adult Ed Teacher should have discussed with the students the cell phone issue. She should explain that while she understands their wishes to have their phones with them, they should only to be used for classroom exercises or emergency purposes.
    What She Should Have Done
  • 35. What could make a difference
    • All of these students actually have a mini-computer in their possession. How could you use the cell phones as technology tools?
    • Students could text grammar exercises to her.
    • Students could use the video options to record each other rehearsing presentations and then review the videos to critique themselves.
    • Students could use the calculator functions while studying math
    • Students could take photos for lessons and projects.
  • 36. Digital Literacy the capability to use digital technology and knowing when and how to use it.
    • Technology-fused learning has become more commonplace
    • Learning WITH doesn’t always include Learning HOW
    • Technology seen as a CLASS as opposed as part of curriculum.
    • Teachers need to know how to use technology to stimulate learning .
    While the copyright for these cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On, readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org.
  • 37. Digital Literacy the capability to use digital technology and knowing when and how to use it.
    • Generational Differences in
    • Online Activities ( Report )
    • Teens and Gen Y: Play games, watch videos, Download Music, Social Networking
    • Gen X: Buy something, get health info
    • All groups (less differences): use email, use search engines, make travel reservations, research products
    http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/Generations-Online-in-2009.aspx
  • 38. Being Digitally Literate Means
    • Learning the Basics
      • Browsers, search engines, email
    • Evaluating Online Resources
      • How to determine the accuracy of information
      • How to determine the trustworthiness and security of online vendors
      • Martin Luther King, Jr. A True Historical Examination
  • 39. Remember
    • Not everything on the Internet is true.
    • Consult various sources to determine the validity of information on the Internet.
    • Use a checklist with things to look for to prove the authenticity of a site’s information.
  • 40. Let’s Try It!
    • Evaluating Online Resources Handout
    • The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/sightings.html
    • Save the Mountain Walrus http://www.hmssurprise.org/Miscellany/walrus.php
    • Genochoice http://www.genochoice.com/
    • Sellafield Zoo http://www.brookview.karoo.net/Sellafield_Zoo/
  • 41. Remember
    • Being Digitally Literate Means
    • Learning the Basics
      • Browsers, search engines, email
    • Evaluating Online Resources
      • How to determine the accuracy of information
      • How to determine the trustworthiness and security of online vendors
  • 42. Digital Etiquette standards of conduct expected by other digital technology users
    • Few rules
    • Inappropriate use seems OK
    • Employers WILL check Facebook, MySpace
    Used with permission, 2009
  • 43. Digital Etiquette standards of conduct expected by other digital technology users
    • Issues to consider
      • Minimize negative effects on others
        • Cell phone/PDA etiquette
      • Use technology when contextually appropriate
        • Netiquette
      • Respecting others online
        • Cyberbullying, flaming, etc.
  • 44. The Megan Meier Story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MxxqcH_Mkc
  • 45. Digital Etiquette standards of conduct expected by other digital technology users
    • Good digital citizens respect others and learn ways to use technologies courteously and effectively
    How’s YOUR moral compass? http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/uploads/ISTECompass.pdf
  • 46. Just Curious
    • You’re walking down the street and listening to your iPod when you run into someone you know.
    Do you need to remove both earbuds to talk to them?
  • 47.
    • Ms. Shannon, the Principal for Valley Adult Ed is expecting an important call from her sister out west.
    • However, she needs to attend the Opening General Session of a conference she is attending.
    Ms. Shannon
  • 48.
    • She entered the ballroom and began to talk to several friends and colleagues. She forgot about the impending phone call.
    • During the keynote presentation, her cell phone rang, loudly. Everyone began looking in her direction as she struggled to find her phone. Because she was flustered, she began the conversation before she exited the room .
    What Happened…
  • 49.
    • She put her phone on vibrate and entered the ballroom. During the keynote presentation, her cell phone vibrated and she quietly got up and left the room to answer the call.
    • That’s being a Good Digital Citizen!
    What She Should Have Done
  • 50. Digital Etiquette Handou t
  • 51. Digital Etiquette standards of conduct expected by other digital technology users
    • Remember
    • Issues to consider
      • Minimize negative effects on others
        • Cell phone/PDA etiquette
      • Use technology when contextually appropriate
        • Netiquette
      • Respecting others online
        • Cyberbullying, flaming, etc.
  • 52. Digital Law the legal rights and restrictions governing technology use You overhear Jack, one of your students talking to Sarah, another student, about the new Dave Matthews CD that he picked up over the weekend. Sarah replies, “Boy, I wanted to get that one too, but my paycheck was just enough to cover bills this week.” Jack says to her, “Don’t worry, I’ll just burn you a copy tonight, free!” While the copyright for these cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On, readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org.
  • 53. Digital Law the legal rights and restrictions governing technology use
    • Pirating software/music
    • File-sharing sites
    • Hacking
    • Identity theft
    • Copyright
  • 54.
    • Identity Theft
    • Pirating Software
    • Copyright
    Google This Baby… 2 Things Everyone Should Know about…
  • 55. Digital Law the legal rights and restrictions governing technology use http://tinyurl.com/idfaceoff
  • 56. Digital Law the legal rights and restrictions governing technology use
    • Remember
    • Pirating software/music
    • File-sharing sites
    • Hacking
    • Identity theft
    • Copyright
  • 57. Digital Rights and Responsibilities the privileges and freedoms extended to all digital technology users, and the behavioral expectations that come with them
    • Rules exist!
      • Any golfers?
        • Water
        • Hazard
        • Mulligans
  • 58. Digital Rights and Responsibilities the privileges and freedoms extended to all digital technology users, and the behavioral expectations that come with them
    • Issues to consider
      • Posting online
        • Poems, songs, photos
        • Is my stuff safe from someone passing it off as their own?
        • Purchasing Rights to a Copyrighted Song http://www.harryfox.com/public/songfile.jsp
        • http://www.halldavidson.net/copyright_chart.pdf
      • Use online material ethically (cite sources)
      • Reporting Cyberbullying,
      • Using Technology to cheat
        • www.turnitin.com
      • Creative Commons www.creativecommons.org (from “All rights reserved” to “Some rights reserved”)
  • 59. How Much Do You Know About Plagiarism? Handout
  • 60. It’s up to you!
    • How will your school handle inappropriate behavior?
    • Do students have a clear understanding of what behaviors are expected?
    • Do you have a Technology Ethics guide?
    While the copyright for these cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On, readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org.
  • 61. Betty’s Story
    • Betty loves to play games on her computer. She’s constantly downloading games and found a solitaire card game on the Internet that is “shareware.”
    • It can be legally used for 30 days and then Betty must either delete it from her computer or send its author a fee. Betty has been using the game for 30 days.
  • 62. What Happened
    • After the 30 day trial period, Betty decided that she really liked the game and believed that she’ll just see how much longer the software will run without timing out.
  • 63. What She Should Have Done
    • Betty realized that her 30 days were up and decided to purchase the game. She sent a PayPal payment to the creator.
    • Two weeks later the creator of the game sent her a link to the newest, upgraded version, with more bells and whistles. Whoo hoo!
  • 64. Digital Health and Wellness the elements of physical well-being related to digital technology use
      • Ergonomics
        • How is your computer situated on your desk? Do you share a computer?
        • Have you experienced pain in your wrists, neck?
        • Do you have eye strain?
    Ergo Checklist and Rulers
    • Online Affairs
    • Online Gambling
    • Online Gaming
    • Compulsive Surfing
    • eBay Addiction
    Addictions
  • 65. Digital Health and Wellness the elements of physical well-being related to digital technology use http://tinyurl.com/internetaddictiontest
  • 66. Digital Security the precautions that all technology users must take to guarantee their personal safety and the security of their network Get Safe Online http://www.getsafeonline.org/ Quiz
  • 67. Digital Security the precautions that all technology users must take to guarantee their personal safety and the security of their network Ms. Perlman gets an e-mail message from someone she does not know. She opens the e-mail message which has an attachment with it. The attachment is entitled “dancing pigs.” She has had a stressful day and feels that she could use a good laugh. The attachment “dancing pigs” might be funny. Ms. Perlman
  • 68. What Happened…
      • Ms. Perlman opened the e-mail. When she did, her computer started doing crazy things and within a period of five minutes, the computer crashed.
      • Ms. Perlman immediately ran to the school technology coordinator to tell her that something was wrong with her computer.
  • 69. What She Should Have Done
    • Ms. Perlman should have opened the e-mail and realized that she didn’t know the sender. She remembered that she had been advised to not open e-mail attachments from strangers. Even though the attachment title sounded interesting, she deleted the message without opening the attachment. She continued checking e-mail.
    Use common sense and good judgment .
  • 70. How do your students protect their data?
      • Breaches occur not because of bad equipment, but because of the way students are using it.
      • Virus protection
      • Spyware
      • Backing up
    http://tinyurl.com/spywaregame
  • 71. At the very LEAST
    • Protect electronic data
    • Virus protection
      • http://www.avast.com/eng/avast_4_home.html
      • http://free.avg.com/us-en/homepage
      • http://vil.nai.com/vil/hoaxes.aspx
      • http://vil.nai.com/vil/default.aspx
      • http://www.symantec.com/norton/ security_response/threatmeter.jsp
    • Backup
        • http://www.skydrive.live.com/
        • https://www.sugarsync.com/signup?startsub=2
  • 72. Bringing it all together Where do we begin? Core Goals Improving learning and outcomes and preparing Students to become 21’st century citizens Student Life Outside the School Environment Digital Commerce | Digital Health & Wellness | Digital Law Student Life Outside the School Environment Digital Commerce | Digital Health & Wellness | Digital Law Student Life Outside the School Environment Digital Commerce | Digital Health & Wellness | Digital Law Core Goals Improving learning and outcomes and preparing Students to become 21’st century citizens Core Goals Improving learning and outcomes and preparing Students to become 21’st century citizens Core Goals Improving learning and outcomes and preparing Students to become 21’st century citizens Core Goals Improving learning and outcomes and preparing Students to become 21’st century citizens School Environment and Student Behavior Digital Etiquette | Digital Rights and Responsibilities | Digital Security Student Life Outside the School Environment Digital Commerce | Digital Health & Wellness | Digital Law Student Learning and Academic Performance (Digital Access | Digital Communication | Digital Literacy)
  • 73. What’s Next ?
    • YOU are in the position to set a tone for appropriate technology use
      • Let’s find out where you’re at right now
      • Digital Citizenship Audit
  • 74. What’s Next ?
        • SCORES
        • 40-50 Use of technology is high/inappropriate use could also be high
        • 30-39 Use of technology is moderate to high. Increased use there is above average technology misuse too
        • 20-29 Middle of the Road
          • School/District not using technology a lot
          • OR educators unaware of issues related to DC
        • 10-19 Low Amount of Inappropriate Use
          • School/District not using technology
          • OR Digital Citizenship problems are minimal
  • 75. Go Forth!
      • Educate your staff, teachers and students about the Nine Elements
      • Consider putting together a Technology Leadership Team (include community members, adult students, support staff)
      • Make use of resources in your packet
  • 76. Are YOU a Digital Citizen? Florida TechNet Debra L Hargrove, Ed.D.,Director Kimberly Gates Fayne Johnson Joan Luebbe Jana Whitehead Copyright for the cartoons by Jerry King belong to From Now On , readers may distribute freely provided they reproduce the credit with a link to Jerry's Web site http://www.jerryking.com/ and to From Now On http://fno.org. An Introduction to the Nine Elements Most of the scenarios were adapted from http://www.slideshare.net/katisearcy as well as Digital Citizenship in Schools , by Mike Ribble and Gerald Bailey. Used with permission BrainPop Videos and Handouts used with permission.