LARGE
S C A L E
AGILET R A N S F O R M A T I O N
Steve Greene | Chris Fry
How Salesforce.com revolutionized their R&D
deve...
History
8
Age of Salesforce in years
from the beginning
3
Number of people in R&D
fast innovativesmart
4Number of Major Releases per year
7 years later
rapid success
35,000+
Customers
900,000
Subscribers
110 Million
transactions per day
200+
people in R&D
but
it was getting more difficult to deliver
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Features Delivered per Team
Days between Major Releases
1Number of Major Releases per year
Why?
Lack of visibility at all stages in the release
Late feedback on features at the end of our
release cycle
Long and unpredictable release
schedules
Gradual productivity decline as the
team grew
What did we do
about it?
Major enterprise-wide Agile
Transformation
in just 3 months
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Features Delivered per Team
Days between Major Releases
Transformation Results
Transformation Results
January
2007
March
2007
November
2007
August
2007
Rapid Reaction for an Agile World
60+ critical fe...
Our customers are happy…
Our teams are happier…
What is ADM?
ADM is a modified Scrum/XP style of product development
that is specific to Salesforce. It employs Scrum proj...
What is ADM?
Re-factoring
Self-organizing
Predictable releases
Transparent
Ftest - Selenium
Continuous integration
Debt fr...
How’d we do it?
Launched organizational
change program
Everyone jumped in together
Created a dedicated, cross-
functional rollout team
Positioned as a return to our
core values
Listen to your
customers
IterateKISS
Distributed Ken Schwaber’s Agile book
Developed 2-hour Agile overview
Sent 30 ScrumMasters to ScrumMaster
Certification
Sent 35 Product Managers to Product
Owner Certification
Created internal, wiki-based website as a reference for team members
What would we do differently?
Train Product Owners earlier and with
more intensity
Involve more individual contributors early
Get outside coaching earlier
Give key executives concrete deliverables
around the rollout
Be more clear about what the agile ‘rules’
are
Keys to success?
Ensure executive commitment
to the change
Focus on principles over
mechanics
Focus on automation
Code Coverage for Salesforce.com
31.1%
46.7%
64.9%
25%
35%
45%
55%
65%
75%
2005 2006 2007 2008
Year
%ofCoverage
2005
2006
...
Provide radical transparency
Advice?
Create a dedicated, cross-functional rollout
team
Get professional help
Focus on getting several teams to
excellence
Create a company sprint heartbeat
Decide early on the right tool
Scrumforce built on the Salesforce Platform
Scrumforce built on the Salesforce Platform
When the heat is on stick to your guns
Encourage radical visibility
and over-communicate
Experiment, be patient and expect to make
mistakes
Agile Roadmap
January OctoberAprilOctober
“Agile Launch”
Big Bang Rollout
“Excellence, Sustainability & Expansion”
Expandi...
Ok, sounds good but what are we
working on now?
Sustainable Velocity
Waterfalling
in sprint
Shared
teams
TDD
Dependencies
Leadership
Don’t be afraid to change the
entire company all at one
time
It’s not Process
It’s ADM
Executive Producer
Parker Harris
Screenplay
Chris Fry
Director
Steve Greene
Co-Producer
Jenny Cheng
Co-Producer
Todd McKinnon
Courtney Broadus
Executive Producers
Steve Greene
Chris Fry
Story Editors
Andrea Leszek
Catherine Courage
Starring
Steve Graykowski
Eric Babinet
Rajani Ramanathan
April Oman
Guest Starring
Matt Ho
Pete Behrens
Rob Myers
Special Guest Stars
Steve Fisher
Woodson Martin
Co-starring
Peter Morelli
Siddhartha Singh
Rasmus Mencke
Amy Farrow
With
Andrew Sandler
Scrum Master
Product Owner
Art Director
UE Producer
STEVE GREENE
CHRIS FRY
ANDREA LESZEK
CATHERINE COURAGE
Program Designer
Release Technician
Survey Designer
Assistant Producer
Adaptation Designer
STEVE GRAYKOWSKI
AMY FARROW
APR...
Art Director of Done
TDD Producer
Product Owner Designer
Phase 0 Consultant
Casting
Extras Casting
Photos
PETE MORELLI
SID...
Scrum Master
Product Owner
Art Director & Developer
Developer
Documentation Designer
ERIC BABINET
CATHERINE COURAGE
ANDREW...
Art Director
Editor
Content Designers
STEVE GREENE
ANDREA LESZEK
CHRIS FRY
ANDREA LESZEK
STEVE GRAYKOWSKI
CATHERINE COURAG...
Special Thanks to
Mike Cohn
Rolled out entirely on location in
San Francisco, California
USA
The characters and events depicted in this rollout are
real. Any similarity to fictional persons, living or dead,
is purel...
This has been a presentation of
Salesforcecom agile-transformation-agile-2007-conference2290
Salesforcecom agile-transformation-agile-2007-conference2290
Salesforcecom agile-transformation-agile-2007-conference2290
Salesforcecom agile-transformation-agile-2007-conference2290
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  • Head of the R&D technology group launched an organizational change program
  • Big Bang Rollout All teams embraced ADM Avoided dissonance between teams All teams on monthly rhythm
  • Another key to our success was a dedicated, fully empowered agile rollout team built from a cross-section of the organization. Consisted of volunteer team members from Dev, QA, Program Management, Doc, UE Used scrum methodology to run the team Met daily for 6 months Implemented Survey Responded directly to Survey Built training Defined “Done” Setup Sprint Reviews, defined best practices Coached teams, execs, functional managers Groomed Backlogs Managed external coaching
  • Positioned the rollout as a return to the Technology teams core values Leveraged the values when teams were stuck or frustrated
  • Bought Schwabers book for every Technology team member Asked everyone to read prior to rollout 2-hour ADM Overview Trained all teams within a 2 week period Helped teams understand why we were changing and why we chose agile Covered the principles of Scrum ScrumMaster, Product Owner & Team Member roles Product & Sprint Backlogs Daily Meetings Definition of Done Burndown, Retrospectives Strongest Objections during training Can’t build big features in 30 days Don’t want to meet everyday (seems like a waste of time)
  • Key to our success Trained 30 ScrumMasters through publicly available CSM training with Mike Cohn and Ken Schwaber (locally) A must for anyone who will be a ScrumMaster Nice overview but not sufficient to be a great ScrumMaster Mike Cohn delivered Product Owner certification to 35 Product Owners on-site (definitely a plus) Covered User Stories
  • Used the wiki as a centralized place to point teams for additional information or training Leveraged lots of information from the internet A primary training tool for new Technology team members today
  • Throughout our initial rollout we heard from many experts that the Product Owner role was key to the success of our agile transformation. Although we intuitively understood this we didn’t truly understand the significant changes that the Product Owners would experience in their role.
  • Initially you may not get feedback from key employees. One great way to involve everyone in your organization up front is to run an open space meeting.
  • Several of the outside coaches we brought in were able to quickly recognize ways to more quickly enable and coach our teams. They also recognized common patterns that we could correct and brought in lessons learned from other organizations transitioning to agile.
  • Executives were key to our success. Giving them small or large tasks related to the agile rollout brings them into the organizational change program and helps them stay grounded in what you are doing.
  • Self-organization can mean anything to anyone. Self-organizing as opposed to assigned tasks is critical to real commitment and engaging the passion of team members. Avoiding partial credit by properly defining done is another aspect of self-organizing.
  • Executive commitment was crucial to implementing massive change. Without executive support the transition might have failed. We had full commitment from Founder and SVP of Technology (although he didn’t understand all of the details he was committed to the principles and end result) Some executives were convinced from the beginning, some had doubts and wanted to first see results Some executives were very outspoken both pro and con
  • Focus on the principles of agile rather than the mechanics helped people understand why we’re moving to an agile process. Some teams/ScrumMasters attempted to execute the scrum methodology literally When teams were frustrated we asked teams to stay focused on principles rather than the letter of the law Teams will not get it right at first, be flexible. Better to execute imperfectly rather than lose confidence in the methodology from teams.
  • An extensive automation suite and build system existed already to support the transformation. This was extremely helpful because we had a base continuous integration system in place and a value system around automated unit and functional testing within the entire development organization.
  • An extensive automation suite and build system existed already to support the transformation. This was extremely helpful because we had a base continuous integration system in place and a value system around automated unit and functional testing within the entire development organization.
  • An extensive automation suite and build system existed already to support the transformation. This was extremely helpful because we had a base continuous integration system in place and a value system around automated unit and functional testing within the entire development organization.
  • During our rollout, transparency in everything that we did was a key to our success. We held all of our daily rollout meetings in a public place so anyone could see how the rollout was progressing. Publish information early and often (even if it is not perfect) Push daily metrics to the entire team to gain instant visibility to the good, bad and ugly When in doubt give exposure to information to whoever wants it Giveaway your knowledge as soon as you gain it
  • This team will become central to managing change and communicating within the organization. They will provide accessibility to everyone in the organization when issues arise and responsibility to address them. We suggest using your new process to run this team. Make sure you over-communicate changes.
  • External coaches have done it before and will see the roadblocks coming before you do. They can also help you learn from other organizations that have gone through similar transitions.
  • Your intuition is often to focus on the teams that are struggling the most. By focusing on creating a few super successful teams you will build momentum and create examples of what you can accomplish with the new process.
  • We developed a one-month sprint cycle early on and had all teams in the same cycle.
  • We are “dog fooding” our own platform to create an agile tool to manage development. Spreadsheets quickly became unmanageable and using our own product to build our product has great side benefits.
  • We are “dog fooding” our own platform to create an agile tool to manage development. Spreadsheets quickly became unmanageable and using our own product to build our product has great side benefits.
  • We are “dog fooding” our own platform to create an agile tool to manage development. Spreadsheets quickly became unmanageable and using our own product to build our product has great side benefits.
  • We are “dog fooding” our own platform to create an agile tool to manage development. Spreadsheets quickly became unmanageable and using our own product to build our product has great side benefits.
  • Coming up with a tag line like “radical visibility” helps people overcome the inertia and fear of sharing information widely. Change is hard and often everyone is busy and not reading their email. So having multiple channels of information and providing the same message over and over helps. When you think that your teams understand a new method or process, repeat it.
  • Encourage a culture of experimentation. You aren’t going to get everything right, so set the expectation that you are going to make a few mistakes. Reward everyone on the team for experimentation: don’t create a punitive environment around making mistakes.
  • Old is bad, new is good
  • Encourage a culture of experimentation. You aren’t going to get everything right, so set the expectation that you are going to make a few mistakes. Reward everyone on the team for experimentation: don’t create a punitive environment around making mistakes.
  • Encourage a culture of experimentation. You aren’t going to get everything right, so set the expectation that you are going to make a few mistakes. Reward everyone on the team for experimentation: don’t create a punitive environment around making mistakes.
  • Encourage a culture of experimentation. You aren’t going to get everything right, so set the expectation that you are going to make a few mistakes. Reward everyone on the team for experimentation: don’t create a punitive environment around making mistakes.
  • Encourage a culture of experimentation. You aren’t going to get everything right, so set the expectation that you are going to make a few mistakes. Reward everyone on the team for experimentation: don’t create a punitive environment around making mistakes.
  • Many people will tell you to experiment with a pilot project first then slowly rollout the process to other teams. It is possible to change the company all at once and this can lead to significant benefits.
  • Salesforcecom agile-transformation-agile-2007-conference2290

    1. 1. LARGE S C A L E AGILET R A N S F O R M A T I O N Steve Greene | Chris Fry How Salesforce.com revolutionized their R&D development methodology in a Big Bang way
    2. 2. History
    3. 3. 8 Age of Salesforce in years
    4. 4. from the beginning
    5. 5. 3 Number of people in R&D
    6. 6. fast innovativesmart
    7. 7. 4Number of Major Releases per year
    8. 8. 7 years later
    9. 9. rapid success
    10. 10. 35,000+ Customers
    11. 11. 900,000 Subscribers
    12. 12. 110 Million transactions per day
    13. 13. 200+ people in R&D
    14. 14. but
    15. 15. it was getting more difficult to deliver
    16. 16. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Features Delivered per Team Days between Major Releases
    17. 17. 1Number of Major Releases per year
    18. 18. Why?
    19. 19. Lack of visibility at all stages in the release Late feedback on features at the end of our release cycle
    20. 20. Long and unpredictable release schedules
    21. 21. Gradual productivity decline as the team grew
    22. 22. What did we do about it?
    23. 23. Major enterprise-wide Agile Transformation in just 3 months
    24. 24. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Features Delivered per Team Days between Major Releases Transformation Results
    25. 25. Transformation Results January 2007 March 2007 November 2007 August 2007 Rapid Reaction for an Agile World 60+ critical features delivered in < 9 months Average Idea to Release rate: 2.2 quarters 70% of Top 10 Ideas on track for delivery in 2007 Summer ‘08 Winter ‘09 Spring ‘08
    26. 26. Our customers are happy…
    27. 27. Our teams are happier…
    28. 28. What is ADM? ADM is a modified Scrum/XP style of product development that is specific to Salesforce. It employs Scrum project management framework and adopts certain XP practices.
    29. 29. What is ADM? Re-factoring Self-organizing Predictable releases Transparent Ftest - Selenium Continuous integration Debt free Just-in-timeIterative Always Potentially Releasable Time-boxed User stories Agile Lean Early feedback Code Reviews Collective Code Ownership Self-correcting
    30. 30. How’d we do it?
    31. 31. Launched organizational change program
    32. 32. Everyone jumped in together
    33. 33. Created a dedicated, cross- functional rollout team
    34. 34. Positioned as a return to our core values
    35. 35. Listen to your customers IterateKISS
    36. 36. Distributed Ken Schwaber’s Agile book Developed 2-hour Agile overview
    37. 37. Sent 30 ScrumMasters to ScrumMaster Certification Sent 35 Product Managers to Product Owner Certification
    38. 38. Created internal, wiki-based website as a reference for team members
    39. 39. What would we do differently?
    40. 40. Train Product Owners earlier and with more intensity
    41. 41. Involve more individual contributors early
    42. 42. Get outside coaching earlier
    43. 43. Give key executives concrete deliverables around the rollout
    44. 44. Be more clear about what the agile ‘rules’ are
    45. 45. Keys to success?
    46. 46. Ensure executive commitment to the change
    47. 47. Focus on principles over mechanics
    48. 48. Focus on automation
    49. 49. Code Coverage for Salesforce.com 31.1% 46.7% 64.9% 25% 35% 45% 55% 65% 75% 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year %ofCoverage 2005 2006 2007 16332 5752 2656
    50. 50. Provide radical transparency
    51. 51. Advice?
    52. 52. Create a dedicated, cross-functional rollout team
    53. 53. Get professional help
    54. 54. Focus on getting several teams to excellence
    55. 55. Create a company sprint heartbeat
    56. 56. Decide early on the right tool
    57. 57. Scrumforce built on the Salesforce Platform
    58. 58. Scrumforce built on the Salesforce Platform
    59. 59. When the heat is on stick to your guns
    60. 60. Encourage radical visibility and over-communicate
    61. 61. Experiment, be patient and expect to make mistakes
    62. 62. Agile Roadmap January OctoberAprilOctober “Agile Launch” Big Bang Rollout “Excellence, Sustainability & Expansion” Expanding Velocity, Expanding Intelligence, Expanding Influence Globally January 144 146 July 148 150 152 Rollout Adoption Excellence Expansion
    63. 63. Ok, sounds good but what are we working on now?
    64. 64. Sustainable Velocity
    65. 65. Waterfalling in sprint Shared teams TDD
    66. 66. Dependencies
    67. 67. Leadership
    68. 68. Don’t be afraid to change the entire company all at one time
    69. 69. It’s not Process
    70. 70. It’s ADM
    71. 71. Executive Producer Parker Harris
    72. 72. Screenplay Chris Fry
    73. 73. Director Steve Greene
    74. 74. Co-Producer Jenny Cheng
    75. 75. Co-Producer Todd McKinnon Courtney Broadus
    76. 76. Executive Producers Steve Greene Chris Fry
    77. 77. Story Editors Andrea Leszek Catherine Courage
    78. 78. Starring Steve Graykowski
    79. 79. Eric Babinet
    80. 80. Rajani Ramanathan
    81. 81. April Oman
    82. 82. Guest Starring Matt Ho
    83. 83. Pete Behrens Rob Myers
    84. 84. Special Guest Stars Steve Fisher Woodson Martin
    85. 85. Co-starring Peter Morelli Siddhartha Singh
    86. 86. Rasmus Mencke Amy Farrow
    87. 87. With Andrew Sandler
    88. 88. Scrum Master Product Owner Art Director UE Producer STEVE GREENE CHRIS FRY ANDREA LESZEK CATHERINE COURAGE
    89. 89. Program Designer Release Technician Survey Designer Assistant Producer Adaptation Designer STEVE GRAYKOWSKI AMY FARROW APRIL OMAN ERIC BABINET RAJANI RAMANATHAN
    90. 90. Art Director of Done TDD Producer Product Owner Designer Phase 0 Consultant Casting Extras Casting Photos PETE MORELLI SIDD SINGH RASMUS MENKE ANDREW SANDLER STEVE GREENE CHRIS FRY iStockPhoto Flickr Google Images
    91. 91. Scrum Master Product Owner Art Director & Developer Developer Documentation Designer ERIC BABINET CATHERINE COURAGE ANDREW WAITE FELIX SUKHENKO MYSTI BERRY Scrumforce Cast
    92. 92. Art Director Editor Content Designers STEVE GREENE ANDREA LESZEK CHRIS FRY ANDREA LESZEK STEVE GRAYKOWSKI CATHERINE COURAGE ERIC BABINET ADM Wiki Cast
    93. 93. Special Thanks to Mike Cohn
    94. 94. Rolled out entirely on location in San Francisco, California USA
    95. 95. The characters and events depicted in this rollout are real. Any similarity to fictional persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Copyright © 2007 Salesforce.com. All rights reserved. First publication of this rollout (process and overview): United States of America 2007. Salesforce.com is the owner of the copyright in this rollout This rollout is protected by the copyright laws of the United States of America and other countries. Any unauthorized duplication, copying, or use of all or part of this rollout may result in a serious dorking in accordance with applicable laws.
    96. 96. This has been a presentation of
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