Geocent scrum cmmi (without animations) 2
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Geocent scrum cmmi (without animations) 2

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  • 1. Adopting CMMI® into Your Scrum Methodology TM 1-KITE-222-AIR TM 1-KITE-222-AIR KITE SYSTEMS TAKE-OFF FAILURE TRIPPING WHILE RUNNING OPERATOR’S AND WATCH YOUR STEP OBSERVERS VIOLENT SPINNING MOTION DURING ATTEMPTED FLIGHT 1. CHECK FRAME AND FLYING LINE CIVILIAN MODEL LOSS OF POWER – NEEDFALLING 2. DOES KITE KITE A TAIL? OK-12A/D 1. CHECK WIND - RUN 2. IS LINE CUT? KITE W/OPTIONAL TAIL 3. TREES OR POWER LINES KITE STUCK IN TREE OR IN POWER LINES TM 0-KITE-222-AIR 1. CLIMB TREE – RETRIEVE KITE 2. GET LADDER HEADQUARTERS 3. CUT LINE DEPARTMENT OF THE AIRY MARCH 2012Susan K. Strain, PMP, PMI-ACP,CSP, CSM Christopher Hudson, PMP, CSMLee McKinney, MS, CSM Gary Zeller, CSM
  • 2. Contact UsLee McKinney Susan Strain• Developer and SCAMPI Team Member • Project Manager and Agile Coach• lee.mckinney@geocent.com • sstrain@sapient.com• http://www.linkedin.com/pub/lee- • http://www.linkedin.com/in/susanks mckinney/30/275/aa PMI-ACPSM Christopher Hudson, PMP, CSM christopher.hudson@geocent.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-hudson/7/905/433 Gary Zeller, CSM gary.zeller@geocent.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/gary-zeller/47/156/358 2
  • 3. What We Are (& Aren’t) Doing Here Assumptions: • Established Scrum methodology • Addressing CMMI Maturity Level 2 • There are negative stereotypes for CMMI in the world of Agile Benefits: • Consistent project management across projects • Improved processes • Additional business opportunities (government contracting & other regulated environments) 3
  • 4. Agenda• Mini-Scrum Exercise• Product Vision o Daily Standup o Release Planning o The Sprint o Backlog Grooming o Sprint Review o Sprint Planning I (overview & estimates) o Retrospective o Sprint Planning II (task creation) o Loose Ends• The artifacts from the activities above will be mapped to the Specific/Generic Practices (SPs, GPs) within each of the CMMI® level 2 process areas below: o PMC – Project Monitoring & Control o MA – Measurement & Analysis o PP – Project Planning o PPQA – Process & Product Quality o CM – Configuration Management Assurance o REQM – Requirements Management o GG2 – Institutionalize Managed Processes• Questions & Answers - 2 minutes between each activity• Wrap-up
  • 5. Introduction to the Project –Scrum Phases, CMMI Process Areas, & Filling In The Map 5
  • 6. Introduction to the Project –Overview of Mini-Scrum • We have an established Agile environment and we are incorporating CMMI in order to improve the Agile processes, not to define them. • We are using CMMI to improve our Scrum processes, not using CMMI to define how Scrum should work. • We are trying to improve on how we Scrum based on the CMMI practices. 6
  • 7. Introduction to the Project –Ground Rules for Mini-Scrum Exercise • Each table will be a Scrum team and you will work together to complete each exercise. • We will go through one release with one sprint. • All activities and associated discussion will be time-boxed. • Please, don’t over-analyze the technicalities, this is just an exercise designed to show how Geocent mapped Scrum artifacts and activities to CMMI Maturity Level 2 process areas and show how they can be beneficial to your Scrum process. We are not teaching Scrum. • At the end of each exercise you will have created artifacts that can be used as evidence for CMMI, which will enhance the Agile Scrum process, as work progresses, you can look back to understand who, when, and why decisions were made, that may impact work going forward. • Although Agile values working products over documentation, that does not mean that no documentation is necessary. End 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7
  • 8. Introduction to the Project –The Matrix 8
  • 9. Product Vision – Purpose Let’s build a kite OK 9
  • 10. Product Vision – Scrum Component Vision: To have an environment where employees are free to go outside and enjoy the lakefront location of our office by flying kites. Some team members 2:00 may enjoy creating a decorative kite to display in their work area. We need to start with simple kites that can be built from readily available materials. Eventually we would like to have other teams join us, to have a friendly kite-:15 building competition, with categories for kites that fly and kites that are decorative. 1:45 0:30 Outcomes: • A kite that flies • A decorative kite • A plan for a kite competition 1:30 :45“The minimum plan necessary to start a Scrum project consists of a vision and a Product Backlog. The vision 1:15describes why the project is being undertaken and what the desired end state is... The Product Backlog defines thefunctional and nonfunctional requirements that the system should meet to deliver the vision, prioritized and1:00estimated.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 10
  • 11. Product Vision – CMMI Mapping
  • 12. Product Vision – evidence Project Management Plan 12
  • 13. Sprint Zero - Project Kick-Off Proposal 13
  • 14. Project Kick-Off – Scrum Component• Define “done”.• Decide how your team will assign story points.• Normalize your stories, identify what is easy, what is hard and what is the largest story that your team can take on in a sprint. 14
  • 15. Project Kick-off – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 16. Sprint Zero - Project Kick-Off - evidence 16
  • 17. Release Planning – Purpose Procurement Construction Testing Competition TimeNecessary Less Optional Optionality More Optional “The Product Owner achieves initial and ongoing funding for the project by creating the project’s initial overall requirements, return on investment (ROI) objectives, and release plans.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 17
  • 18. Release Planning – Scrum Component• Prioritize the User Stories you have already created.• If necessary, write additional Epics or User Stories.• Have at lease the first two releases identified - prioritize your user stories into a release plan.• Initial release should have at least one simple kite flying, and either a decorative kite design or the outline of a competition plan. E nd 1:00 1:01 1:02 1:03 1:04 1:05 1:06 1:07 1:08 1:09 1:10 1:12 1:13 1:14 1:15 1:16 1:17 1:18 1:19 1:20 1:21 1:22 1:23 1:24 1:25 1:26 1:27 1:28 1:29 1:30 1:31 1:32 1:33 1:34 1:35 1:36 1:37 1:38 1:39 1:40 1:41 1:42 1:43 1:44 1:45 1:46 1:47 1:48 1:49 1:50 1:51 1:52 1:53 1:54 1:55 1:56 1:57 1:58 1:59 2:00 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:08 0:09 0:10 0:12 0:13 0:14 0:15 0:16 0:17 0:18 0:19 0:20 0:21 0:22 0:23 0:24 0:25 0:26 0:27 0:28 0:29 0:30 0:31 0:32 0:33 0:34 0:35 0:36 0:37 0:38 0:39 0:40 0:41 0:42 0:43 0:44 0:45 0:46 0:47 0:48 0:49 0:50 0:51 0:52 0:53 0:54 0:55 0:56 0:57 0:58 0:59 1:11 0:11 18
  • 19. Release Planning – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 20. Release Planning – evidence Configuration Management Plan 20
  • 21. Backlog Grooming - Purpose“The list of requirements is called the Product Backlog. The Product Owner is responsible for using the ProductBacklog to ensure that the most valuable functionality is produced first and built upon; this is achieved byfrequently prioritizing the Product Backlog to queue up the most valuable requirements for the next iteration.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 21
  • 22. Backlog Grooming – Scrum Component Starting with the user stories you created in Release Planning, break the highest priority epics down into workable stories. Reprioritize based on any new information you may have. INVEST • Independent • Negotiable • Valuable • Estimable • Small • Testable 22 22
  • 23. Backlog Grooming – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 24. Backlog Grooming - evidence 24
  • 25. Sprint Planning I – Overview & Estimates“The Sprint planning meeting has two parts. The first four hours are spent with the Product Owner presentingthe highest priority Product Backlog to the Team. The Team questions him or her about the content, purpose,meaning, and intentions of the Product Backlog. When the Team knows enough, but before the first four hourselapses, the Team selects as much Product Backlog as it believes it can turn into a completed increment ofpotentially shippable product functionality by the end of the Sprint. The Team commits to the Product Ownerthat it will do its best.” 25 -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber
  • 26. Sprint Planning I – Scrum Component • The Product Owner should present the backlog of stories that they want done in this sprint. • Sprint should create a potentially deliverable kite and one other story. • Team should understand WHAT is required, but not HOW to do it. • Team should assign story points to each story. 26
  • 27. Sprint Planning I – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 28. Sprint Planning I – evidence 28
  • 29. Sprint Planning II – Task Creation “During the second four hours of the Sprint planning meeting, the Team plans out the Sprint. Because the Team is responsible for managing its own work, it needs a tentative plan to start the Sprint. The tasks that compose this plan are placed in a Sprint Backlog; the tasks in the Sprint Backlog emerge as the Sprint evolves. At the start of the second four-hour period of the Sprint planning meeting, the Sprint has started…” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 29
  • 30. Sprint Planning II – Scrum Component 11 0 • Team should figure out HOW to do it. 1 • Team should write tasks for each story, on sticky notes. Don’t forget testing tasks. 10 2 • Arrange your stories on the table in a taskboard. Identify columns for, “In Progress” and “Done”. • The team should commit to only to the stories 9 3 that they believe that they can complete in a 3 minute sprint. 8 • The scribe should take minutes. 4 7 5 6 30
  • 31. Sprint Planning II – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 32. Sprint Planning II – evidence 32
  • 33. Daily Standup – Purpose“Every day, the team gets together for a 15-minute meeting called a Daily Scrum. At the Daily Scrum, each Teammember answers three questions:What have you done on this project since the last Daily Scrum meeting?What do you plan on doing on this project between now and the next Daily Scrum meeting?What impediments stand in the way of you meeting your commitments to this Sprint and this project? Thepurpose of the meeting is to synchronize the work of all Team members daily and to schedule any meetings thatthe Team needs to forward its progress.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 33
  • 34. Daily Standup – Scrum Component • What did you do yesterday? • What are you working on today? • Do you have any impediments? • Flag stories with impediments, to identify possible risks. • Is there a small task that is taking much longer than estimated” • Have requirements changed due to something discovered during the sprint?
  • 35. Daily Standup – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 36. Daily Standup – evidence 36
  • 37. The Sprint – Purpose “The purpose of the sprint to create a potentially deliverable product.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 37
  • 38. The Sprint – Scrum Component :45 :30 • You will find all of the items needed to build the kite in the envelope on your table. • You have 3 minutes to build and test your kite. • Move tasks through, “In Process” to “Done”. • If appropriate, add impediments to stories or tasks. • The scrum master should track the burndown. 2:00 1:00 1:30 2:45 2:30 2:15 1:15 1:45 :15 38
  • 39. The Sprint – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 40. The Sprint – evidence 40
  • 41. Sprint Review – Purpose User Stories Completed Burndown• Built a kite• Made a plan for a competition Incomplete User Stories • None User Stories Not Started Impediments/Support Required/Risks • None • No wind. “At the end of the Sprint, a Sprint review meeting is held. This is a four-hour, time-boxed meeting at which the Team presents what was developed during the Sprint to the Product Owner and any other stakeholders who want to attend. This informal meeting at which the functionality is presented is intended to bring people together and help them collaboratively determined what the Team should do next.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 41
  • 42. Sprint Review – Scrum Component • The team should demonstrate the work done to the Product Owner. • Stakeholders should provide feedback to team. • Product Owner should be asked if they accept each user story • The scribe should take minutes of the meeting and document Product Owner acceptance or rejection of each user story, feedback, risks, and impediments. 1:00 1:01 1:02 1:03 1:04 1:05 1:06 1:07 1:08 1:09 1:10 1:12 1:13 1:14 1:15 1:16 1:17 1:18 1:19 1:20 1:21 1:22 1:23 1:24 1:25 1:26 1:27 1:28 1:29 1:30 1:31 1:32 1:33 1:34 1:35 1:36 1:37 1:38 1:39 1:40 1:41 1:42 1:43 1:44 1:45 1:46 1:47 1:48 1:49 1:50 1:51 1:52 1:53 1:54 1:55 1:56 1:57 1:58 1:59 2:00 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:08 0:09 0:10 0:12 0:13 0:14 0:15 0:16 0:17 0:18 0:19 0:20 0:21 0:22 0:23 0:24 0:25 0:26 0:27 0:28 0:29 0:30 0:31 0:32 0:33 0:34 0:35 0:36 0:37 0:38 0:39 0:40 0:41 0:42 0:43 0:44 0:45 0:46 0:47 0:48 0:49 0:50 0:51 0:52 0:53 0:54 0:55 0:56 0:57 0:58 0:59 1:11 0:11 End 42
  • 43. Sprint Review – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 44. Sprint Review – evidence 44
  • 45. Sprint Retrospective - Purpose What did we do well? What could we do better? “After the Sprint review and prior to the next Sprint planning meeting, the ScrumMaster holds a Sprint retrospective meeting with the Team. At this three-hour, time-boxed meeting, the ScrumMaster encourages the Team to revise, within the Scrum process framework and practices, its development process to make it more effective and enjoyable for the next Sprint. Together, the Sprint planning meeting, the Daily Scrum, the Sprint review, and the Sprint retrospective constitute the empirical inspection and adaptation practices of Scrum.” -- Agile Project Management with Scrum / Ken Schwaber 45
  • 46. Sprint Retrospective – Scrum Component • The scribe should take minutes of the meeting. END 2:00 :00 :30 1:00 1:30 46
  • 47. Sprint Retrospective – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 48. Sprint Retrospective – evidence 48
  • 49. Tie-up Loose Ends - Purpose Plan for Data Management Identify Configuration Items Establish a configuration Management System Establish Records Establish an Organizational Policy Plan the Process Provide Resources Assign Responsibility Manage Configurations Objectively Evaluate Adherence Review Status with Higher Level Management 49
  • 50. Tie-up Loose Ends – Artifacts & CMMI
  • 51. Tie-up Loose Ends – evidence Configuration Management Plan 51
  • 52. Review A relevant process improvement model… • The majority of Scrum activities are relevant to the intent of CMMI ML 2 practices • Many one-to-many relationships • Scrum practitioners already produce much of what ML 2 expects; the capture is the primary gap Is Scrum more effective than the improvement CMMI offers in some way? • The two are not mutually exclusive • Complimentary approaches for answering the same question • Consistent Agile project execution and organizational maturity go hand-in-hand • The competitive perspective is rooted in personnel Our road to ML 2 included establishment of some ML 3 assets… • Geocent has organizational templates in place for PMP and CMP development • Geocent has organizational policy and plan in place for cross-project PPQA Can you adopt CMMI using Scrum? • CMMI should be adopted incrementally; a natural application of Scrum • Build a backlog (start with benchmarking existing processes, etc..) • Plan releases to be process improvement milestones • A dedicated process group is ideal for the Scrum team • Geocent adopted CMMI-DEV using a waterfall approach, given limited availability of process 52 personnel
  • 53. Questions & Answers • Are there any questions? 53
  • 54. Contact UsLee McKinney Susan Strain• Developer and SCAMPI Team Member • Project Manager and Agile Coach• lee.mckinney@geocent.com • sstrain@sapient.com• http://www.linkedin.com/pub/lee- • http://www.linkedin.com/in/susanks mckinney/30/275/aa PMI-ACPSM Christopher Hudson, PMP, CSM christopher.hudson@geocent.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-hudson/7/905/433 Gary Zeller, CSM gary.zeller@geocent.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/gary-zeller/47/156/358 54