English 102<br />Deanna Dixon<br />Writing the Multicultural Research Project<br />
Introduction and Thesis<br />Try to come up with an attention grabbing start to the paper. You might pose an interesting s...
Organization of the Body<br />You may choose either the block pattern or the point-by-point pattern for comparison/contras...
Conclusion<br />Do not merely restate the introduction or give a summary of the paper.<br />You should use this paragraph ...
Transitions<br />Don’t forget to include your transition words/phrases! Transitions can come in between sentences, paragra...
Incorporating Sources<br />Each paragraph (aside from the introduction and the conclusion) should include a paraphrase or ...
Use MLA Documentation Style<br />Every quote must include a parenthetical reference, or in-text citation!<br />EVERY sourc...
Don’t forget to proofread/revise!<br />Before you turn in the paper, read through it thoroughly for punctuation/spelling/g...
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Writing The Multicultural Research Project

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Writing The Multicultural Research Project

  1. 1. English 102<br />Deanna Dixon<br />Writing the Multicultural Research Project<br />
  2. 2. Introduction and Thesis<br />Try to come up with an attention grabbing start to the paper. You might pose an interesting scenario, ask a thought-provoking question (which you will answer in the paper), or give a quote from the novel that introduces your point.<br />Make sure to give some background on the setting/culture you plan to explore. Briefly introduce the audience to some of the issues you will be focusing on in the body of your paper.<br />Your thesis statement should include the WHAT (the settings/cultures you plan to compare/contrast and the novel you are writing about, the HOW (the points of comparison/contrast), and the WHY (what’s the overall point you are trying to make in the paper; what does the novel’s portrayal of the setting/culture reflect/teach us?).<br />
  3. 3. Organization of the Body<br />You may choose either the block pattern or the point-by-point pattern for comparison/contrast<br />Point-by-Point Pattern<br />Introduction<br />Point 1 of Comparison/Contrast<br />A. Novel<br />B. Real Life<br />Point 2 of Comparison/Contrast<br />A. Novel<br />B. Real Life<br />Repeat Previous Paragraphs with Points 3,4,5, etc.<br />Conclusion<br />Block Pattern<br />Introduction<br />Culture/Setting of the Novel (multiple paragraphs)<br />Culture/Setting of Real Life based on your research (multiple paragraphs)<br />Paragraph of Analysis (What do the points of comparison/contrast say? What point are you trying to emphasize with these points?)<br />Conclusion<br />Make sure to include your analysis of the points within the paragraphs.<br />
  4. 4. Conclusion<br />Do not merely restate the introduction or give a summary of the paper.<br />You should use this paragraph to further explain the overall point of your paper (the WHY in your thesis).<br />Leave your reader with a thought-provoking point or question (that you’ve already provided the information necessary to answer).<br />
  5. 5. Transitions<br />Don’t forget to include your transition words/phrases! Transitions can come in between sentences, paragraphs, or sections.<br /> Sometimes a single word or phrase will be enough to successfully transition (e.g. Similarly, In addition, For instance) between points. <br />However, at other times (especially at the end of paragraphs) it might be helpful to briefly summarize what you’ve just stated and connect it to the point you are about to make.<br />Words/Phrases that Indicate Comparison: also, in the same way, just as ... so too, likewise, similarly<br />Words/Phrases that Indicate Contrast: but, however, in spite of, on the one hand ... on the other hand, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, in contrast, on the contrary, still, yet<br />
  6. 6. Incorporating Sources<br />Each paragraph (aside from the introduction and the conclusion) should include a paraphrase or a direct quote from an outside source.<br />When you quote directly, make sure that you LCE—lead-in, cite correctly, explain!<br />It’s important to use sources that back up the points you’re a making, but don’t let them overshadow your own analysis/opinions.<br />LCE !<br />
  7. 7. Use MLA Documentation Style<br />Every quote must include a parenthetical reference, or in-text citation!<br />EVERY source used in the paper must be represented by a properly punctuated bibliographic reference on your “Works Cited” page.<br />The last page of the paper must be your “Works Cited” page where you list all of your sources, according to MLA style, in alphabetical order.<br />If you need a refresher, please see the links to the TCTC library handouts from the blog.<br />
  8. 8. Don’t forget to proofread/revise!<br />Before you turn in the paper, read through it thoroughly for punctuation/spelling/grammar mistakes.<br />Look at the revision questions I will be posting on the blog. Answer them for your own paper. Ask a family member or friend to answer them for your paper as well.<br />Make sure that you follow ALL of the requirements given in the handout and in this presentation.<br />
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