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Campbell high school podcast 3 theme

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Theme is worth 20 points for the Summer Reading assignment. This podcast will help you set up your response for a top score.

Theme is worth 20 points for the Summer Reading assignment. This podcast will help you set up your response for a top score.

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  • 1. Campbell High School Summer Reading Podcast #3- Theme
  • 2. Theme Question #1- Theme • What is a theme? • A theme is more than the main idea. It is a common thread or universal notion presented throughout the text. Creative Commons Photo by Jennerly http://www.flickr.com/photos/96976831@N00/10215167
  • 3. Theme Common Themes in Literature  Sacrifices bring reward  All human beings have the same needs.  Friendship makes life more meaningful.  Loneliness leads people to seek companionship.  The strong often prey on the weak.  Love is the worthiest of pursuits.  Death is a part of the life cycle.  The pressures of society may not align with what makes you happy.  Adversity can lead to triumph.
  • 4. Theme How to read for theme- • Notice that themes are detailed, not one word like “love.” • The author intends for the reader to take away a big idea from the reading of the book. • Themes are often complex life lessons.
  • 5. Theme How to read for theme- • Ask yourself … “What does the author want me to think about after I finish the book?” • The theme isn’t overtly stated, you have to infer what the author wants you to know from the whole reading experience.
  • 6. Theme How to read for theme- • Brainstorm a list of themes as they appear in the book. • If you see a pattern, for example, the same theme reoccurring throughout the book, then this is an important theme.
  • 7. Theme How to read for theme- • You can complete question #1 two ways. – Select one theme and find three specific examples of the theme demonstrated in your book. – Select three themes and find one example of each theme demonstrated in your book.
  • 8. Theme How to read for theme- • Your answer should look like this: – Theme – Specific example from the book that shows the theme. Cite the page number or chapter. – Write a detailed analysis of how this example supports the theme.
  • 9. Theme How to read for theme- • Your answer should look like this: – One or two paragraphs per example. – At least three paragraphs or more for a complete, appropriate response to earn all the points on this section of the rubric.
  • 10. Theme Common Themes in Literature and Non Fiction  Sacrifices bring reward  All human beings have the same needs.  Friendship makes life more meaningful.  Loneliness leads people to seek companionship.  The strong often prey on the weak.  Love is the worthiest of pursuits.  Death is a part of the life cycle.  The pressures of society may not align with what makes you happy.  Adversity can lead to triumph.
  • 11. Theme How to read for theme-  The strong often prey on the weak.  Adversity can lead to triumph.  Talking to strangers is dangerous. Creative Commons Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/annethelibrarian/
  • 12. Theme Example: One theme of “Little Red Riding Hood” is that talking to strangers is dangerous. Little Red Riding Hood spoke to the wolf, who was in disguise. She gave out personal information like where her grandmother lived and what treats her grandmother was preparing for her to eat (Chapter 1). Small children are often naïve when it comes to dangerous situations. The author wants readers to understand the fear and terror that Little Red Riding Hood experienced so children reading the story will learn the lesson of caution and awareness.
  • 13. Theme Example: One theme of “Little Red Riding Hood” is that talking to strangers is dangerous. Little Red Riding Hood spoke to the wolf, who was in disguise. She gave out personal information like where her grandmother lived and what treats her mother sent in the basket for her grandmother to eat (Chapter 1). Small children are often naïve when it comes to dangerous situations. The author wants readers to understand the fear and terror that Little Red Riding Hood experienced so children reading the story will learn the lesson of caution and awareness.
  • 14. Theme Example: One theme of “Little Red Riding Hood” is that talking to strangers is dangerous. Little Red Riding Hood spoke to the wolf, who was in disguise. She gave out personal information like where her grandmother lived and what treats her grandmother was preparing for her to eat (Chapter 1). Small children are often naïve when it comes to dangerous situations. The author wants readers to understand the fear and terror that Little Red Riding Hood experienced so children reading the story will learn the lesson of caution and awareness.
  • 15. Rubric Task Points 1. Theme 20 2. For fiction, analyze two characters. For nonfiction, analyze two events or situations. 10 3. Quotations 10 4. In-class Essay- Will be administered the week of August 26-29, 2013 for Fall and the week of January 27-31, 2014 for Spring. * 40 Points Total (A separate grade will be given for the in-class essay)

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