The Social Side of Project Management

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  • Hello and welcome to today’s webinar: The Social Side of Project Management. My name is Jill Skene, Marketing Campaign Specialist at IGLOO Software, and I will be your moderator for this event.
  • Today’s session has been sponsored by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Special thanks to the PMI Information Systems Specific Interest Group who generously contacted their membership base to inform them of the event. As a result of this partnership, all project managers that are registered for the call will receive professional development units (PDUs) from PMI-ISSIG.
  • So, let’s get started. The project management discipline is inherently social. It’s not just about how well you manage the work, it’s about how well you manage the people doing the work. But, traditional project management tools are not built to support this approach. Their strength lies in the what, not the how of managing projects. They’re about managing timelines, deliverables, milestones and stages & gates. During this 60-minute webinar, we’ll dive into this notion of social project management. First, we’ll discuss the current state of project management & the challenges we face Then, we’ll explore the social side & the benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance the traditional project manager’s toolkit - And, finally, we’ll delve into the risks of maintaining the status quo & what a 2.0 project information strategy could look likeWe’ll also showcase the practical application of social technologies with a quick demonstration of how it can be used to manage the software development cycle.
  • Speaking today is Sheri Burgos, the Founder and President of Vinezoom. Sheri has over 20 years of consultative experience in the IT industry. She is a seasoned project manager proficient in managing large and complex IT infrastructure projects in both the private and public sector domain.Also presenting for Vinezoom is Robert Castel, Managing Partner. Robert has extensive experience implementing high risk, complex IT related projects in Canada, the U.S. and the United Kingdom. As an independent project manager, his clients have ranged from the major Canadian financial institutions to Canadian provincial and federal government agencies.
  • Speaking from the social side is Stephanie Sawyer, Product Manager, IGLOO Software. As Product Manager, Stephanie is responsible for managing the community platform, leading the product strategy team, defining project requirements and helping plan the product roadmap. Her passion for technology and experience managing a series of social applications has equipped her well to explore the integration of social technologies into both traditional and agile project management processes.Also from IGLOO, we have Daniel Kube, Vice President. Daniel has over two decades of success and experience in alliances, business development, sales, and marketing for several leading organizations including PricewaterhouseCoopers, Performancesoft, actuate, and IONA Technologies( Now Progress Software). With a background in performance management, Daniel is well equipped to help organizations move towards implementing social business practices with an eye towards results. Once again, I am Jill Skene and I will be moderating today’s discussion.
  • Now that we’ve introduced your speakers, here’s a quick summary of who is attending this webinar. The most common title of registrants, is of no surprise, of course – and that is Project Manager – with a particular bent towards information systems. A myriad of industries are also represented, from financial services to health care, and we hope that this will help produce rich discussion during the Q&A session as we discuss socializing project management within very different work environments. With that, I’ll pass it over to Daniel to set the stage for today’s educational event.
  • Let’s start by discussing the realities of business. As we all know… managing people can be hard… sometimes extremely hard.This is because each individual in your organization is different… in their views, skills, experiences, beliefs and behaviours.And in most cases… our work habits are changing… no longer is our job a 9 to 5 activity… fuelled by unlimited access to broadband and wireless internet connectivity… this enables us to work from home, on the road… and from almost anywhere in the world… at anytime… 24/7!And finally… your employees don’t work alone… they work on teams and collaborate with others in your company to complete their daily business tasks.
  • So… if managing people is hard… managing teams is even harder.As you know… dealing with group dynamics is never easy… and it gets even more difficult when dealing with teams that are:Cross functionalWork across time zonesVary in their cultural makeup or Have huge generational gaps between team members.It gets even more challenging when team members are constantly on the road – and never in the office.I think you would be surprised at how many of your employees have actually never met... “face to face” with many of the team members they work with on a daily basis.
  • When you look at managing teams & projects, there are some fundamental truths that exist regarding project management. These four principles have guided our thought process for this webinar. 1. All “projects” are not the same… they can differ in: scope, goals and objectives, timelines, budgets & resources, importance andexpected outcomes.2. We all use some form of project management tools: from simple to sophisticated, from structured to ad hoc (ex. Excel, Email, MS Project, Zoho, Primavera)3. Project management is inherently social. Every member of a project team will differ in some way  in their views, skills, experiences,beliefs, behaviors or even in the tools they rely on at work. They can be assembled across functional areas or geography, and can even present project managers with the unenviable task of bridging cultural gaps or a generational divide.4. Projects have a history of failure. In 1996, John Kotter published Leading Change – what is considered to be the Seminalwork in the field of change management. Kotter’s research revealed that only 30 percent of change programs succeed.For Technology initiatives, CIOs and IT execs tell Forrester that the range of project success rates across firms is wide, ranging from 30% to 90% (Cardin, Lewis. Debunking IT Project Failure Myths. Forrester Research. July, 2008).
  • A new style & approach to project management has emergedImportant points: One will not replace the other; both must coexist (especially in larger organizations) Social technologies can play a role in both sets of projects, enhancing the probability of success
  • Information Transparency: tears down the walls between stakeholders and project teams (project insurance) enhanced accountability and responsibility (forensic analysis when a project fails – enables post mortem analysis of projects)Process Efficiencies: open access to project information less reliance on email (closed-off means of communication)
  • A day in the life of a project manager is filled with emails, phone calls and face-to-face meetings gathering information to keep a project on track. Coordinating activities, collecting information from disparate team members and managing information in silos can place a large administrative burden on the project manager. Easy to fall into the trap of managing tasks vs. project complexity. Project management tools came from a different era – they focus on the “what” not the “how” of managing projects. It’s about: Nailing down project process (closed-off) Focus on single project execution (it’s never about collaboration) What are we managing (timelines, deliverables, milestones, stages & gates)
  • Social technologies can play a role in both ad hoc, small-scale departmental projects as well as within very structured, large-scale projects, enhancing the probability of success. Creation of a Stakeholder Strategist/Facilitator role as part of the PMOWhat if we took a different look at the project management function? And created a bridge role – bridge communication from the various project management teams into the organization as a whole: sharing project feedback, challenges and best practices. Internal communication & collaboration: share information & facilitate collaboration across project teams Content creation & knowledge capture: central hub for project knowledge documentation Measurement & reporting: track project success metrics, conduct forensic analysis & post mortems on all projectsIt’s a hybrid role – a mix of communication, community management, knowledge management and project management skills.
  • If you are interested in learning more, please check out the white paper entitled The Social Side of Project Management available on our website at www.igloosoftware.com. A link will also be provided in the follow up email to all registrants. {mention the product roadmap, social project management features & solicit interest in the advisory council for this new premium template}
  • We now have a bit of time for questions and answers, so if anyone would like to ask a question of our panel, please feel free to do so in the chat field of the WebEx program.--Thank you everyone for attending this thought provoking presentation. And thank you especially to Sheri, Robert, Stephanie and Daniel for sharing your time, knowledge, and expertise with all of us. A recording of this webinar will be available for you to download or preview on our website at www.igloosoftware.com.
  • The Social Side of Project Management

    1. 1. The Social Side of Project Management<br />June 24th, 2010<br />Sheri Burgos<br />MBA, PMP Founder and President, Vinezoom<br />Robert Castel<br />PMP Managing Partner, Vinezoom<br />Daniel Kube<br />Vice President, IGLOO Software<br />Stephanie Sawyer<br />Product Manager, IGLOO Software<br />
    2. 2. Webinar Sponsor:<br />PMI Information Systems Specific Interest Group<br />PMI-ISSIG's Vision is to become the preferred, global, collaborative, professional project management organization for all aspects of project management required for information systems, regardless of industry. <br />http://www.pmi-issig.org<br />
    3. 3. #socialproject<br />Twitter hashtag<br />@ynanasi @IGLOOSoftware<br />
    4. 4. Webinar Agenda<br />Project Management Challenges<br />Project management practices in 2010<br />The evolution of project management<br />The Social Side of Project Management<br />Benefits of a Social PM Function<br />Case Study: Socializing the Product Management Process<br />Risk of Maintaining the Status Quo<br />A day in the life of a project manager<br />Missed opportunities?<br />Social Project Sharing & 2.0 Information Strategies<br />Managing talent, knowledge & relationships<br />Stakeholder engagement/community management in the PMO<br />Note: Please enter your questions in the chat window at any time during the session. Questions will be answered at the conclusion of the presentation. <br />
    5. 5. Our Presenters<br />Sheri Burgos<br />MBA, PMP – Founder and President, Vinezoom<br />Sheri is the Founder and President of Vinezoom based in Toronto, Canada and has over 20 years of consultative experience in the IT industry. She is a seasoned project manager proficient in managing large and complex IT infrastructure projects in the private and public sectors domains. Sheri is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and a certified ITIL Service Manager in delivering IT service management initiatives. She recently completed the Athabasca Executive MBA Program with a major in Project Management, researching IT project success, analyzing best practices and exploring leading principles.<br />Robert Castel<br />PMP – Managing Partner, Vinezoom<br />Robert has extensive experience implementing high risk, complex IT related projects in Canada, the U.S. and United Kingdom. As an independent project manager, his clients have ranged from the major Canadian financial institutions to Canadian provincial and federal government agencies that involved national and global initiatives spanning application development, voice, data and network infrastructures, as well as ITSM and privacy related initiatives. He holds the Project Management Professional (PMP) designation and is currently pursuing an MBA at Athabasca University and Advanced Leadership Series courses at the University of Toronto.<br />
    6. 6. Our Presenters<br />Stephanie Sawyer<br />Product Manager, IGLOO Software<br />As Product Manager, Stephanie is responsible for managing the community platform, leading the product strategy team, defining project requirements and helping plan the product roadmap. With a passion for technology, Stephanie has spent time working in Canada's major high-tech hotbeds, including Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver and finally, Kitchener-Waterloo. Here, she has spent the last 3 years working with a variety of startup companies managing the product strategy for a series of online applications, including a Facebook app which lets users interact with each other as they watch live television and a NanoGaming platform that was used to power interactive games.<br />Daniel Kube<br />Vice President, IGLOO Software<br />Daniel has over two decades of success and experience in alliances, business development, sales, and marketing for several leading organizations including PricewaterhouseCoopers, Performancesoft, actuate, and IONA Technologies( Now Progress Software). Most recently he was Global Vice President of Marketing and Alliances for the Performance Management division where he was also responsible for successfully creating and launching Actuate Onperformance ( SaaS) offering.<br />
    7. 7. Who’s Participating…<br />Webinar Attendee Snapshot:<br />American Express<br />AT & T<br />Bank of America<br />Bank of Canada<br />FedEx<br />Harley-Davidson<br />HP<br />T. Rowe Price<br />Consultant<br />Architect<br /><ul><li>Dept of Agriculture
    8. 8. IBM
    9. 9. Memorial Healthcare System
    10. 10. Starbucks
    11. 11. Shell</li></ul>Sales/BusinessDevelopment<br />Information Systems<br />ProjectManagement<br />KnowledgeManagement<br />E-Commerce<br />Manager<br />Director<br />Web Marketing<br />Academic/Research<br />Training<br /><ul><li>Industries Represented:
    12. 12. Financial
    13. 13. Telecommunications
    14. 14. Healthcare
    15. 15. Enterprise
    16. 16. Marketing
    17. 17. Consulting
    18. 18. Technology
    19. 19. Government</li></li></ul><li>Setting the Stage<br />
    20. 20. Managing People is Hard<br /><ul><li>Tenure
    21. 21. Culture
    22. 22. Generational Gaps
    23. 23. Knowledge
    24. 24. Skills
    25. 25. Abilities
    26. 26. Expertise
    27. 27. Expectations
    28. 28. Relationships</li></li></ul><li>Managing Teams & Projects is Even Harder<br /><ul><li>Share
    29. 29. Collaborate
    30. 30. Communicate
    31. 31. Problem Solve
    32. 32. Geographies
    33. 33. Time zones
    34. 34. Departments
    35. 35. Hierarchies</li></li></ul><li>The Facts<br />All projects in the workplace are not the same<br />Scope, size, duration & complexity<br />We all use some form of project management tool(s)<br />From simple to complex; structured to ad hoc (ex. email, Excel, Project, Primavera)<br />Project management is inherently a social activity<br />People generally drive the success or failure of any project – big or small<br />Phase/gates mean nothing if the team does not effectively collaborate & communicate<br />As Project Managers, we are all trying to find new ways to improve project success rates<br />Project success rates across firms is wide, ranging from 30-90% according to Forrester<br />Web 2.0 phenomenon is driving a new approach to project management<br />
    36. 36. Project Management Challenges<br />Project Management Circa 2010<br />Project Management Methodologies<br />
    37. 37. Project Management Circa 2010<br />Complexity of business and projects<br />The stats on projects <br />Collaborative workforce<br />Communication in project delivery<br />
    38. 38. Project Management Methodologies: Two Paths to Success<br />Agile Project Management<br />Small teams<br />Empowered people<br />Agile planning<br />Minimal scope<br />Small projects<br />Fast pace (rapid release)<br />Alpha, beta – feedback – responsiveness – iteration<br />WaterfallProject Management<br />Large teams & many stakeholders<br />Top-down<br />Gantt charts, risk registers<br />Complex dependencies<br />Large-scale projects<br />Extended time horizons<br />Highly structured – sequential stages – escalating requirements can be costly<br />
    39. 39. The Social Side of Project Management<br /><ul><li>Business Benefits</li></li></ul><li>Business Benefits<br />Information transparency<br /><ul><li>Project Charters
    40. 40. Project team trust andPMO’s strength
    41. 41. Stabilizing force</li></ul>Process efficiencies<br /><ul><li>Meetings
    42. 42. Initiation, planning, execution, controlling, closure processes</li></li></ul><li>IGLOO Software<br />We help organizations deploy successful online business communities powered by social software.<br />Audience<br /><ul><li>Employees & Teams</li></ul>Business Value<br /><ul><li>Productivity, agility & innovation through a more connected & knowledgeable workforce</li></ul>How?<br /><ul><li>Creating “team driven” corporate networks that connect employees to the people, information and processes they need in order to get their jobs done effectively and efficiently</li></ul>Audience<br /><ul><li>Prospects, Customers, Partners, Suppliers & Alumni</li></ul>Business Value<br /><ul><li>Brand loyalty and building trusted relationships</li></ul>How?<br /><ul><li>Extending social software beyond the corporate firewall to connect with your partners, customers and suppliers to create deeper, stronger & more trusted relationships</li></ul>ENTERPRISE 2.0<br />
    43. 43. Social Project Management in Action<br />Business Challenge<br />Connect the development, product & project management teams in order to improve communications and foster team collaboration.<br />Community Solution<br />Secure social intranet site with a dedicated group space.<br />Serves as “project insurance”<br /><ul><li>Nothing lost in email threads
    44. 44. Transparency for all stakeholders
    45. 45. Historical archive & audit trail </li></li></ul><li>The Business Risk – Status Quo<br />
    46. 46. The Risk of Maintaining the Status Quo<br />A day in the life of a project manager<br />Meetings, meetings and more meetings<br />Information overload<br />Multitasking<br />Managing tasks vs. project complexity<br />Narrowing the focus<br />Tools from another era<br />Downward spiral of value proposition<br />Communication gaps<br />Internal & external stakeholders<br />Outdated policies & procedures<br />Communication vehicles<br />
    47. 47. Social Project Strategies<br />Talent<br />Knowledge<br />Relationships<br />
    48. 48. Social Project Strategies<br />Knowledge management as a strategic asset<br />Communities and leadership<br />Real-time communication<br />MarketingDepartment<br />External KeyStakeholders<br />Services Department<br />Project Manager<br />R & D Department<br />Operations Department<br />
    49. 49. Project Knowledge Strategies<br />Learning based culture<br />Leveraging talent in a community<br />Relationships and trust<br />Talent<br />Knowledge<br />Relationships<br />
    50. 50. A Socialized PMO<br />“Employees”<br />My View<br /><ul><li>Information
    51. 51. Conversations
    52. 52. Relationships
    53. 53. Bookmarks
    54. 54. Teams
    55. 55. Connections</li></ul>A Stakeholder Strategist in the PMO<br />“Teams”<br />“Enterprise”<br />Group View<br /><ul><li>Project teams
    56. 56. Departments
    57. 57. Business Units
    58. 58. Committees
    59. 59. SIGs</li></ul>Corporate View<br /><ul><li>Knowledge
    60. 60. People
    61. 61. Talent
    62. 62. Expertise
    63. 63. IP
    64. 64. Projects
    65. 65. Relationships
    66. 66. Processes</li></li></ul><li>Still Interested in the Social Side of Project Management? <br />Download the White Paper: The Social Side of Project Management.<br />We are looking for 3 more organizations to join the IGLOO advisory council – help shape our social project management template. Email the CEO of IGLOO at: dlatendre@igloosoftware.com. <br />Contact Vinezoom for a Social Project Management Assessment and Pilot. Email the CEO of Vinezoom at: sheri.burgos@vinezoom.com. <br />
    67. 67. Thank You!<br />Email: sheri.burgos@vinezoom.com<br />Website: www.vinezoom.com<br />Tel: 647.966.5653<br />Email: dkube@igloosoftware.com<br />Website: www.igloosoftware.com<br />Tel: 519.489.4120 <br />1.877.ON IGLOO<br />www.igloosoftware.com<br />

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