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Rti & family engagement 03 14-13

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This is a comprehensive overview of how to get families engaged with Response to Instruction and Intervention

This is a comprehensive overview of how to get families engaged with Response to Instruction and Intervention

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  • Welcome.. Top of the Morn’n to you. Hope you all survived St Patty’s day! We will start this morning viewing a video on the importance of Family Engagement. You have video guide if you wish to jot down some notes.
  • Cloze Reading. I am going to read the slide to you and when I get to the red words, I want you to read them with me. ReadyNext Slide…
  • Turn to your table mate and share the take aways of these statements. Turn to another table mate and reflect on way that your parents or caretakers were involved with your education?Did it make a difference.Pull sticks and call on numbers.
  • What the 6 minute video clip on What role do parents play in the RTI process, including when do they become involved, are they on the decision making team, and where can they learn more about RTI? - January 2010 (06:33)Count off by three Open up to table of Content Group 1 will review School Wide Screening and then turn to 16 to share out information Group 2 Progress Monitoring page 17Group 3 Tiered Instruction page 20Group 4 High Quality Research page 28Group 5 Collaboration 27Group 6 Fidelity and Important Information for Parents page 27Group 7 Tiered Instruction Tier 3 and PDE Parent Resource
  • Defines parent involvement as:Regular, two-way and meaningful communicationAn integral role in assisting with their child’s learningFull partners in their child’s education Parental involvement always has been a centerpiece of Title I. However, for the first time in the history of the ESEA, it has a specific statutory definition. The statute defines parental involvement as the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school activities, including ensuring:that parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning; that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school; that parents are full partners in their child’s education and are included, as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child; and that other activities are carried out, such as those described in section 1118 of the ESEA (Parental Involvement). [Section 9101(32), ESEA.]
  • So although it is sometimes challenging to get family involvement, it is critical and is supported by law.
  • Francine….
  • If ESEA ever gets reauthorized the is a base level of $$ being set aside.New term is FE as oppose of Parent Involvement: more inclusive Many districts are hiring specific central office supervisor to over see FE initiatives. Districts are making this a priority as it has such a powerful impact on student learning.KTO, RtII, Sig Schools,
  • But, there are important issues that parents need to be aware of. If we, as parents, are not educated on the RTII process and what IDEA requires, our schools may fail to identify some children who do have specific learning disabilities Here is schema of how parents should be involved in the RtII process.. But how do we get them there?
  • Review the Agenda
  • Schools have recognized the importance of parent/family units for 1000s of years.Before there were formal schools parents were the educators.In 1995 Epstein identified six different types of parent involvement.In 2006 the PTA issued the National Standards for Family Partnership.With the ever changing family structure we know refer to Family Engagement.There is also a difference between Involvement and Engagement.
  • At the tables talk about the difference, share out.
  • Highlight the shifts in the next three slides.
  • Karen Mapp co author of Beyond The Bake Sale…show bookDefines FE as…..
  • Susan Woodhouse of Penn State found that when young children are secure with their parents they tend to handle their emotions better which has an impact on developing school readiness skillsKaren Mapp suggested that parental involvement is even more important for low-income and limited English proficient families and that the negative effect of poverty can be partially alleviated when parents engage in learning activities with their children. 40 yr history that says the FE has impact on student outcomes. “where’s the beef” staff will want to know the importants. Reading to students; talking to them; 3 a day read, talk and encourgage students Dubi National Campaigne. Reading with and to: Engage them in conversation about the book: What kinds of questions should the parents ask: teach parents how to engage students: model for parent, have the parents practice the skill; Story about how she tried to get out of work; Kids role is to not tell parents, It is the schools job to tell parents how to and the importance of higher level classes; When the teachers know the parents there is better chance that the students will behave. In Boston the teacher says that it is the best Behavior management: I have the phone numbers on spead dial. The kids respect me that the kids know that I know the families It is work in the beginning but it saves time throughout the year.
  • • extreme diversity of today’s schools necessitates that parent education models look at the range of family diversity – culture, education, language, poverty – including methods of communication. • use of technology can pose a big problem – not all families can receive email; information posted on websites doesn’t reach homeless families• scheduled times for parent meetings must be flexible
  • • extreme diversity of today’s schools necessitates that parent education models look at the range of family diversity – culture, education, language, poverty – including methods of communication. • use of technology can pose a big problem – not all families can receive email; information posted on websites doesn’t reach homeless families• scheduled times for parent meetings must be flexible
  • What are some reasons why families may be reluctant to become involved with the school. Watch a video from Karen Mapp. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMZqHVDiw7wDistrict hands out school climate survey. We want parents to say yes to these: start with the end in mind. What do we have to do to answer questions positively. What can we do to make parent be an active communicator in the school.Role: Active communicator; advocate ( parents can fight for what the schools needs funding for new school in Baltimore) If it is meaningful to the parent can positively advocate for the school.. Not just the one child; nuturing= educational spirit; volunteering; educator by supporting student education; modeling appropriate behavior; In Boston there is a family engagement class families take the parent university in boston 7 credit; parent university 8 points: have graduation cermony: students see the parents graduate from parent university it becomes an inspiration for the students= if they can do it Ican do it; Decision makers;Here is whatMapps came up with . Encouragers: This is the number one way that is link to student achievement. It is very important because you don’t have to speak English or graduate. This is important to validate this. It involves more than just seeing them in the building. Some of these activities don’t take place in the school. (work, psychological barrier, intimidated, ELL embarrassed to come to school because they don’t speak English) HS students: Mapps asked HS students do you want them out of your hair or do you want them engaged. HS students want parents involved. All of them say YES. We don’t want them as our friends, but to Monitor us and set the supports that we need. Family E at the HS level is more important at the HS level than any other time in their lives. Our institution have it wrong. We need to provide them with the supports and models for kids to grow. At the HS have parent support groups. Ask the parents what they need> understanding the adolescent, college plannning, (needs to start by the fifth grade: reason is because that is when taking classes is important; example Algebra is a deal breaker when it comes to getting into college; must take Algebra by 7th grade).How do families get engagedLearn from mediaProgramsTheir parents: either what they didn’t do or what they didSituation that pops up/ Tention filledSchool/teachersChurchesDoctors officeLets think about it for a second: that assumes that the parents have the opportunities to learn: this is a gap: The opportunity gap: if you are new to the country or Social Capital: represented by the number of networks you have ( church, sports, parent organization, neighborhood) A lot of information about schools get shared through these networks, Tell you about the good teachers, classes, all of these are how information gets shared through the network, So if the parents not have the networks they are limited in getting information. So if a parent is not engaged it may be because of limited networks. Noted that many times schools don’t validated FE only if they see advocates, decision maker, collaborators. Schools to validate parents if they don’t show up at school; but parents may have limited networks or embarrassed about coming to school Parents get labeled non caring parents when school don’t see them. Parents were involved of the Sat School leaders in the community. Careful don’t make assumptions about families that may not be true… If we go into the community or homes we would see that they do care.
  • HAND OUT THE SURVEY Have the participants take the survey. Keep it and we will use it as we go through out the day. Take into consideration In the book Beyond the BakesaleMapp describes school on a rubric, Are you This is a fortress school Below Basic…Not friendly: No matter what we do parents just don’t care! We promise all but they don’t attend: reason parents just don’t care is the schools thoughts about it. Not that it is the school. Teachers are not social workers. We don’t smooze parents. Parents can’t handle the standards or data; parents are too low to understand; not worth our wild to share. Hard to get into the building: people are mean and are treated poorly. Front office is critical to send the right message to the parent. Story about how people are treated in the front office: want to speak to principal: can’t see without the appointment.This is a oneCome if we Call School BasicThis is a twoWhat do you see The door is closedYou can come when we say soWe know what is best; Open house: first activity at the school designed to welcome family: how are those open houses are planned: walk into the building where do you go: who is taking to you there: talking about procedures policies: the rules and regulation : what kind of school policies: scheduling appt; Any dialogue” NOWhere do you go next: child's class:Teacher: what is talked about RULE: homework; grades, behavior: How many teachers lover open house night? Who loves it? One person A free night; get paid, cookiesWhy do we keep it? It’s the way we have always do it that way? Clue: lets change the open houses Family know that you teachers don’t want to be there: Imagine you move to neighborhood; neighbor has open house you go and do the neighbors tell you the rules of the neighborhood. Don’t call us we will call youOpen Door School (Proficient)This is a 3:Little better: open doorStudent teacher parent conference: student is part or the conversation: more of an partnership between teacher;parentAction Team: Committee at the school: to make changes; change the open house: family fun night with a theme. Parent have the front parking spaces: Price is right night: math night: got name cards: Principal as MCTable of items: estimate the items: then when they went to to classroom every classroom had a different type way to teach math. It was fun! And still learningThink about the action team: school party planners, parents; Not just feast and festivals but There is no partnership in planning.Partnership School (Advanced)This is a fourEqual parntershipNot give me your kids and go away.But have them as partners: ALL Family activities are connected to learning:Not random F activities that are not connected to learning. Linked to learning: In the book:Not all is happening just at the school but can happen in the community, and the parents want to learn how to support their childs learning: more than the list: parents have to be shown how to do the teaching:What are some of the goals that you are trying achieve in schools: Reading comprehensionFluencyMath strategiesProblem solvingOpen ended questionsWritten expression:So these are the clues about what your FA should be about.Parens should be able to say what the goals two things that they are to be able to do by the end of the year. If all families can’t answer those questions not a partnership school. So when they come to that meeting they can talk as a parntership.Turn into workshop where parent can learn
  • Watch the video of parent engagement… Where are you on this continum
  • Key Points:-Video clip, available at given link, describes family participation in RtI problem-solving process when decision to pursue special education eligibility made.-Experienced educator & parent provide information.Ideas to Consider:-Show this clip to school staff and families as the problem-solving process is initiated for a student or give out for stakeholders to view on their own, with explanation.-Discuss differences in how both families and staff might view special education referral through the RtI problem-solving vs. traditional process, based on this educator’s story.
  • multiple school-wide initiatives might diffuse the communication of all of them; avoid fragmentation of communication with families
  • important for the RTI community to know this work – National PTA has adopted it and most of the Title I schools are using it• RTI fits naturally within the framework• Comment: In Pennsylvania the guidelines for RtII say that parents should receive information about RTII at the beginning and are incorporated into each piece of it as part of the team • a critical point – when families resist or don’t want to engage, it is because we are creating something new that seems formidable to them• if parents have information and know the language being used in the school, it seems safer• to draw parents in and to make them receptive and willing to be involved with RTII, we might say something like, “We have lots of ways to make sure children are learning effectively, and I’m really fascinated by the way your child learns; we want to try some different instructional approaches to which we think he may respond better.”
  • At their tables, have them select standard one and review the component. Have them list their evidences and areas that they need to gather evidence or change practices. Look toward moving to the Partnership school.
  • Community by students, families, and schoolsParticipation of alumni in school programs for students.Inform families of community programs for students, such as mentoring, tutoring, business partnerships.
  • wide variety of definitions and vocabulary about RTI among internet sites, state departments, and individual schools extremely confusing to parents, e.g., response to intervention vs. response to instruction• a good lesson and example from the implementation of PBS: each building clearly defines appropriate behavior, hangs information on the walls, trains each person
  • wide variety of definitions and vocabulary about RTI among internet sites, state departments, and individual schools extremely confusing to parents, e.g., response to intervention vs. response to instruction• a good lesson and example from the implementation of PBS: each building clearly defines appropriate behavior, hangs information on the walls, trains each person Watch a video on APTT, a proven method to instruction parents
  • upon referral, provide support and education to create partnerships• follow special education procedures but never let the law create a barrier to communication• procedures should foster communication
  • Review the Agenda
  • Transcript

    • 1. RtII & Family Engagement It’s Everyone’s Business! LIU RtII Committee March 20, 2012
    • 2. “Involving the community and engaging parents in the education of their children is critical for the successful implementation of any intervention associated with closing the achievement gap and increasing graduation rates.”
    • 3. “However, unless parent and community involvement in education is deliberately planned and connected to a school’s and district’s academic goals for students, such efforts may not produce the desired results.” - California Action Team Plan 2009
    • 4. Intentional Parent/Family Involvement within the RTII Framework Is Critical
    • 5. The Law: No Child Left Behind (2002) (First Statutory Definition in Elementary and Secondary Education Act - ESEA) The participation of parents in regular, two-way, meaningful communication involving students’ academic learning and other school activities. The involvement includes ensuring that parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning; that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school; that parents are full partners in their child's education and are included as appropriate, in decision making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child. (NCLB, 9101(32) ESEA)
    • 6. The Law: State Performance Plan • Indicator #8: Percent of parents with a child receiving special education services who report that schools facilitated parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for children with disabilities. • Pennsylvania Sample Question – Are you an equal partner with teachers and other professionals in planning your child’s educational program?
    • 7. Communication with Parents • Communication with parents must be in the parent’s preferred language and mode of communication. Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title VI • It is the LEA’s responsibility to provide for translation (written) and/or interpretation (oral) services. In order to do this, LEAs must determine the preferred mode of communication of the parent and develop a plan for translation and interpreter services. • PDE provides translated documents necessary for communication with parents and students regarding general education and NCLB requirements via TRANSACT. • Other translated PA forms for special education can be found at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN). • Individualized LEA documents must be provided by the LEA and must be part of the regular budget planning of the LEA for core language instructional programs. Educating Students With Limited English Proficiency (LEP) and English Language Learners (ELL). Basic Education Circular
    • 8. Some Trends in the Field of Family Engagement • Proposed increase in Title One set-aside for family engagement from 1% to 2% • Central office positions for the sole purpose of Family Engagement initiatives • A priority in many grants or initiatives include Family Engagement activities/trainings.
    • 9. Family-School Partnership in RtII
    • 10. Agenda for the Session • Define parent involvement vs. Family Engagement • Explore research that shows the effects of family engagement • Examine potential practices in family Engagement • Use the PTA standards to consider activities and practices that you now have in place or may want to implement.
    • 11. A National Shift Based on the Law and Research The Six Types of Parent Involvement (Epstein, 1995) • Parenting • Communicating • Volunteering • Learning at Home • Decision-Making • Collaborating with Community National Standards for Family-School Partnerships (PTA,2009) • Welcoming All Families • Communicating Effectively • Supporting Student Success • Speaking Up for Every Child • Sharing Power • Collaborating with Community
    • 12. What is the difference? How are the words Involvement and Engagement different? Turn and talk
    • 13. What is the Shift? Traditional Parent Involvement • Parents • Schools are responsible • School initiated, set formal meetings • School to home, one- way communication Family Partnering • Family • Families and schools share responsibility • Flexible hours and meeting venues • Ongoing two-way communication
    • 14. What is the Shift? Traditional Parent Involvement • Parents give consent to educational plans • Structured volunteering • Homework is often seen solely as the child’s responsibility, with consequences for lack of completion Family Partnering • Educational plans are jointly developed and delivered • Supporting learning at home and school • Homework is seen as an important home-school link and communication tool, with continuous successful completion integral to academic achievement and behavioral learning
    • 15. What is the Shift? Traditional Parent Involvement • Often more of a compliance focus • Annual reviews tend to be primary touch points, with formal progress reports • Schools and home both working towards goals, but often separately Family Partnering • Compliance AND student outcome focus • Also, there is school and home progress monitoring, two-way communication • Coordinated learning between home and school, focused on goals and outcomes
    • 16. What is the definition of Family Engagement? Family Engagement is any way that a child’s adult caretaker (biological parents, foster parents, sibling, grandparents, etc.) effectively supports learning and healthy development. (Karen Mapp, 2013)
    • 17. What the Research Says • Faster literacy acquisition • Earn higher grades and test scores • Enroll in higher level programs • Are promoted more and earn more credits • Adapt better to school and attend more regularly • Have better social skills and behavior • Graduate and go on to higher education.
    • 18. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families What to consider Consider family diversity (including culture, education, language, and poverty) when designing your school/family methods of communication
    • 19. Cultural Differences can be perceived as obstacles…. “The world in which you were born is just one model of reality. Other cultures are not failed attempts at being you: they are unique manifestations of the human spirit.” ~ Wade Davis
    • 20. Families are Engaged as… • Supporters of their children’s learning • Encouragers of an achievement identity, a positive self image, and a “can do” spirit • Monitors of their children’s time, behavior, boundaries, and resources • Models of lifelong learning and enthusiasm for education • Advocates for improved learning opportunities for their children and their schools • Decision-makers/choosers of educational options for their children, the school, and community • Collaborators with schools staff and members of the community. (Karen Mapp, 2013)
    • 21. Take a survey • What type of school do you have?
    • 22. Activity Family-School Partnering Continuum Where are you and your school staff members, families, and community resources on the partnering continuum ? Give it a number! • Home and school are separate, very different worlds. It is the school’s responsibility to educate children, and the family’s responsibility to see that the children are dressed, fed, and prepared for school. • Schools share the responsibility for education with families. The partnership with families is flexible: on some issues the parents will be the more active partner and on others, the school will be. 1 10
    • 23. Reflections “Students will need more than just good teachers and smaller class sizes to meet the challenges of tomorrow. For students to get the most out of school, we need to promote a partnership between parents, community leaders, and teachers. . .Only through partnerships can our schools keep improving and stay on the right track.” -Susan Castillo, Oregon Superintendent of Public Instruction ~ June 2003
    • 24. What is the Role of the Family in the RtII Process?
    • 25. Start with Explaining RTII to All Families • At the beginning of the year and throughout the school year • Remember you are explaining a regular education initiative that is actually a response to instruction prior to the intervention.
    • 26. Incorporate Information • Incorporate RtII information into existing school-wide parent involvement strategies. • Have multiple resource formats such as video, brochures, short highlights, websites, signs around the school.
    • 27. Framework Many schools are using… Joyce Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Parent Involvement and/or The National Standards for Family-School Partnerships (PTA,2009)
    • 28. School, Family and Community Partnerships Your Handbook for Action Epstein et al. (2002) National Standards for Family-School Partnerships (PTA,2009) Communicating Communicating Effectively Collaborating Collaborating with Community Learning at Home Speaking Up for Every Child Volunteering Supporting Student Success Decision-making Sharing Power Parenting PLUS Welcoming All Families
    • 29. Standard 1: Welcoming all Families into the School Community • Help all families establish home environments to support children as students • Offer a welcoming environment and respect each family • Recognize the value of family and community involvement as a positive outcome for all.
    • 30. Standard 1 Strategies Help all families establish home environments to support children as students. • Info on: – home conditions that support learning at each grade level. – parenting and child rearing at each age and grade level. • Courses/training for parents (e.g., GED, college credit, ESL and family literacy.) • Family support programs - health, nutrition, and other services. • Neighborhood meetings to help families understand schools and schools to understand families. 30
    • 31. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 1 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 32. Standard 2: Communicating Effectively • Effective forms of 2-way communications about school programs and children's progress is critical. • Don’t think that just because parents don’t show up they don’t want to communicate.
    • 33. Standard 2 Strategies Effective forms of 2-way communications about school programs and children's progress. • Conferences with every parent to share: assessment results, student progress data, RtII process, and any interventions/strategies used, including their effectiveness. • Regular Home-School communications – website, newsletters, e-mail blasts, social media, robo-calls, student folders, etc. • Address communication needs/strengths of culturally and linguistically diverse families. 33
    • 34. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 2 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 35. Standard 3: Supporting Student Success • Recruit and organize parent help and support • School and Family collaboration • A two way flow of communication strengthens the depth of learning for students and enhances academic performance
    • 36. Standard 3 Strategies Recruit and organize parent help and support. • Annual survey to identify talents, times, and locations of volunteers. • School/classroom volunteers to help teachers, administrators, students, and other parents. • Parent/family center with resources and information staffed by volunteers. • Class parents or other structures to provide all families with needed information. • Mentors for families. 36
    • 37. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 3 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 38. Standard 4: Speaking Up for Every Child  Provide information and ideas to families about how to help students at home with homework and other curriculum-related activities, decisions, and planning  Family members who are advocates
    • 39. Standard 4 Strategies • Information on: –skills required for students in all subjects at each grade –homework policies and how to monitor and discuss schoolwork at home. –how to assist students to improve skills on various class and school assessments. 39
    • 40. Standard 4 Strategies • Homework that requires students to discuss and interact with families on what they are learning in class. • Calendars with activities for parents and students at home. • Family math, science, and reading activities at school. 40
    • 41. Standard 4 Strategies • Summer learning packets or activities. • Family participation in setting student goals each year and in planning for college or work. • Involve families and their children in all-important curriculum-related decisions. 41
    • 42. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 4 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 43. Standard 5: Shared Decision Making • Include family members in school decisions, developing parent leaders and representatives • Having knowledge provides the parents/family unit an equal playing field when participating in educational decision making • Recognizing that all parties share an important role in supporting positive outcomes for the student.
    • 44. Standard 5 Strategies • Networks to link all families with parent representatives. • Include parent leaders from all racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and other groups in the school. • Offer training to enable leaders to serve as representatives of other families, with input from and return of information to all parents. • Include students (along with parents) in decision-making groups. 44
    • 45. Standard 5 Strategies Include parents in school decisions, developing parent leaders and representatives. Engage as champions and critical friends: • Active PTA/PTO or other parent organizations, advisory councils, or committees. • Independent advocacy groups –To work for and support school reform and improvements. 45
    • 46. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 5 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 47. Standard 6: Collaborating with Community • Identify and integrate resources and services from the community to strengthen school programs, family practices, and student learning and development • Develop an understanding of resources and how each can contribute towards student achievement and positive outcomes
    • 48. Standard 6 Strategies • Info on: – community health, cultural, recreational, social support, and other programs or services – community activities that link to learning skills and talents, including summer programs for students. • Service integration through partnerships involving school; civic, counseling, cultural, health, recreation, and other agencies and organizations; and businesses. 48
    • 49. “Look Fors” and Evidence • Turn to Standard 6 • At your tables review the considerations and your current evidence • Add ideas that you may want to try
    • 50. SO HOW WILL WE SUPPORT FAMILIES THROUGH THE RTII MODEL? Let’s start with Tier 1…
    • 51. Multi-Tiered Family & Community Partnering Support Practices: Respecting Time and Resources Intensive Tier – FEW (includes all Universal, Targeted) Individualized school and community partnering for a few families, students and school staff. Targeted Tier - SOME (includes all Universal) Focused school/community outreach and problem- solving partnering for some families, students and school staff. Universal Tier - ALL Positive school climate with school-wide efforts to welcome, include, and support every student and family; stated beliefs that: (1) education is a shared responsibility between families and schools; (2) families are equal partners; (3) student success is always the focus; each classroom provides coordinate learning opportunities for home and school
    • 52. Tier I: Universal Tier Supports Checklist ALL Families/Staff SCHOOL _____1. Providing a shared understanding of the evidence and legal base for partnering. _____2. Creating a welcoming, culturally responsive environment with multiple visiting and volunteering opportunities (home and school). _____3. Communicating partnering beliefs: (a) Education is a shared responsibility between home and school;(b) Families are equal partners;(c) Student success is always the focus. _____4. Integrating partnering practices and language into all documents, procedures, teams. _____5. Ensuring every family uses the school technology - parent portal, email, website. _____6. Ensuring every family knows the importance of their actions in supporting learning at home: (a) Frequent and systematic discussions about school; (2) Encouraging their children regarding schoolwork; and (3) Providing or working with resources to provide supervision, support for homework and after-school time. _____7. Sharing the RtII process with all staff and families. _____8. Providing family education on learning-related topics, based on identified needs. _____9. Including families in school decision-making, such as on accountability committees. _____10. Using data systematically to improve and expand family partnering practices. _____11. Allocating time for a staff person to support personnel and families in partnering. _____12. Collaborating with community resources.
    • 53. Tier 1: Universal Tier Supports Checklist All Families/Staff CLASSROOM _____1. Contacting every family personally to create ongoing, two-way communication. _____2. Ensuring each family, including students, understands class and homework expectations, and how everyone will partner if a student struggles. _____3. Providing information on current learning content, with specific out- of-school coordination strategies and follow-up. _____4. Asking families what they need to support learning at home and following up. _____5. Sending progress data regularly to families, with opportunities for discussion. _____6. Telling students that school and home are working together for their success.
    • 54. Make Sure Families Know… The language, RtII steps and processes being used in your school
    • 55. Tell parents about any new instructional practice that will be used in the classroom and how the students’ progress will be monitored
    • 56. • Teach families the vocabulary the school will be using • Use Academic Parent Teacher Trainings
    • 57. Let ALL parents know what they can do at home to reinforce what is happening at school. A good idea to provide training
    • 58. Make sure families know how the school will communicate with them and how they can request information or talk to the teacher. Consider Home Visits?
    • 59. Considerations for Tier 2 • Many of the same types of strategies used in Tier 1 will then be carried over to Tier 2 • It may become more specific to the specific needs of the students • Standard 2 Communicating; Standard 3 Supporting Student Success; Standard 4 Speaking Up for Every Child and Standard 5 Shared Decision Making become critical at this level.
    • 60. Tier 2 Targeted Tier Supports Checklist SOME Families/Staff (includes Universal) ______1. Designating people and processes to reach out and individually encourage families and staff who may be hesitant or uncomfortable. ______2. Including families as equal partners throughout the individual RtII problem-solving process, providing information and participation in decision-making. ______3. Supporting teachers and families in mutually developing and implementing individual student plans such as IEPs, BIPs, and READ. ______4. Ensuring families understand and participate in the implementation of small group (standard protocol) interventions.
    • 61. Problem-Solving Method Define The Problem Is there a problem? What is it? Analyze Why is it happening? Develop a Plan What should be done about it? Evaluate Did it work?
    • 62. When moving a student to Tier two or three, make sure parents clearly understand why a child is getting additional instruction/ interventions, what academic areas are being included, what they can do at home, and how progress or problems will be communicated
    • 63. Considerations for Tier 3 • Many of the same types of strategies used in Tier 1 and 2 will then be carried over to Tier 3 • It may become more specific to the specific needs of the students • Standard 2 Communicating; Standard 3 Supporting Student Success; Standard 4 Speaking Up for Every Child and Standard 5 Shared Decision Making become critical at this level.
    • 64. Tier 3 Intensive Tier Supports Checklist A FEW Families/Staff (includes Universal and Targeted) _____1. Individualizing family-school partnering plans and support when needed. _____2. Providing school, family and community wraparound when needed. _____3. Providing conflict resolution support and process when needed.
    • 65. Explain How RtII Overlaps with Special Education Individualized strategies and the component of Specific Learning Disability Determination (approx. 5% of students) is required by IDEA 2004. Defining SLD (Specific Learning Disability) In Terms of RTI: Assumption: If a child does not respond to instruction that is effective for the vast majority of children, then something is different about the child causing the non- response. RTI, when implemented with high quality, eliminates poor instructional quality as a viable explanation for learning difficulty.
    • 66. Remember….. A parent may ask for an evaluation at any time throughout the process. – RTI process cannot be used to delay-deny an evaluation for eligibility under IDEA. Office of Special Education Programs to State Directors of Special Education, 01/21/11. If the child is being referred for an evaluation to determine special education eligibility, educate and support the family to understand the special education process and their child’s present level of performance.
    • 67. Explain the data, communicate and celebrate progress!
    • 68. Parent Involvement & Multi-Tiered Interventions WelcomingAllFamilies Communication SpeakingUpforEveryChild SupportingStudentSuccess SharedDecision-making
    • 69. Agenda for the Session • Define parent involvement vs. Family Engagement • Explore research that shows the effects of family engagement • Examine potential practices in family Engagement • Use the PTA standards to consider activities and practices that you now have in place or may want to implement.
    • 70. In Summary DO NOT underestimate the importance of the families in the successful implementation of RTI and evidence based instruction